Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Waste reduction (16)

To cure affluenza, let’s be satisfied with stuff we already own

The Guardian / Richard Denniss / 29 October 2017

Our embrace of “convenience” and our acceptance of our inability to plan ahead is an entirely new way of thinking, and over the past seventy years we have built a new and different economic system to accommodate it.

There is nothing inevitable about this current way of thinking, consuming and producing. On the contrary, the vast majority of humans who have ever lived (and the majority of humans alive today) would find the idea of using our scarce resources to produce things that are designed to be thrown away absolutely mad.

But the fact that our consumer culture is a recent innovation does not mean it will be easy to change. Indeed, the last few decades have shown how contagious affluenza can be. But we have not always lived this way, which proves that we don’t have to persist with it. We can change – if we want to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Trailblazing with an awesome, zero-waste grocery store

National Observer / Elizabeth McSheffrey / 08 March 2017

Nu Grocery hasn’t opened yet, but once Leloup finalizes lease negotiations, she expects to launch sometime this summer. She’s keeping the location a secret until then, but said the one-stop shop will sell everything in bulk from dry goods to beauty products. Customers are invited to bring their own containers, borrow them from the store using a deposit, or buy containers when they get there.

It’s still in the “implementation phase,” said Leloup, and she wasn’t immediately able to say when she expected to break even or make a profit. But already, the concept has received high praise from the Ottawa community. On Tuesday, she was awarded a Bootstrap Award for Community Impact, which celebrates entrepreneurs who are “working their tails off, self-financing and doing it the hard way.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ontario taking next step to go waste-free

Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change / 01 March 2017

Today, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change Glen Murray announced Ontario’s Strategy for a Waste-Free Ontario: Building the Circular Economy. This new strategy outlines the province’s plan to fight climate change by reducing landfilled materials that could otherwise be reused, recycled, composted and reintegrated into the economy.

The strategy includes 15 concrete actions to build up the province’s circular economy and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from landfills, such as:

  • Requiring producers to take full responsibility for the environmental and financial management of their products and packaging, including small appliances, electrical tools, batteries, fluorescent bulbs, mattresses, carpets, clothing and furniture
  • Implementing a framework to reduce the volume of food and organic waste going to landfill
  • Requiring industrial, commercial and institutional sectors to divert more of the waste they produce from landfills
  • Banning certain materials, such as food waste, beverage containers, corrugated cardboard and fluorescent bulbs and tubes, from disposal and driving creative strategies to reuse and recycle these items
  • Improving oversight and accountability in the waste management sector, including by requiring producers to register and report on their waste management activities

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

Synthetic clothing, tires polluting the oceans in a big way

CNBC / Anmar Frangoul / 22 February 2017

A new report from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has found that as much as 31 percent of the estimated 9.5 million tonnes of plastic that enters the ocean annually could be from sources such as tires and synthetic clothing.

These products can release “primary microplastics”, which are plastics that directly enter the environment as “small particulates”.

According to the IUCN, which released the report on Wednesday, they come from a range of sources.

These include synthetic textiles, which deposit them due to abrasion when washed, and tires, which release them as a result of erosion when driving.

The report identified seven “major sources” of primary microplastics: Tires, synthetic textiles, marine coatings, road markings, personal care products, plastic pellets and city dust.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ontario recognizes Waste Reduction Week

Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change / 17 October 2016

Here’s how you can help:

  • Compost your food waste. A compost bin is an easy way to reduce organic waste, like fruit and vegetable peelings, stale bread and even paper products like napkins or paper towels.
  • If re-useable products aren’t available, choose easily recyclable items, like aluminum cans and glass bottles.
  • Purchase products that are returnable, reusable or refillable.
  • Learn to love your tap water.
  • Make wise packaging selections – buy in bulk and avoid individually wrapped items or single-serve containers whenever possible.
  • Bring a reusable bag with you to the store instead of using plastic bags.
  • Reduce your paper footprint by printing less at work, having your bills and bank statements sent to you electronically, and reading newspapers and magazines online instead of having them delivered to your home.
  • Skip the paper towels and use washable towels and rags to dry your hands or clean up spills.
  • If you have clothing or household items you don’t use anymore, give them to a friend or donate to a charity.
  • Share your own ideas and post them on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Be sure to tag @ONenvironment and use hashtag #WasteReductionWeek.

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

Ontario passes new Waste-Free Ontario Act

Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change / 01 June 2016

ontario_logoTo help divert more waste from landfill, the province has passed the Waste-Free Ontario Act that will:

  • encourage innovation in recycling processes and require producers to take full responsibility for their products and packaging
  • lower recycling costs and give consumers access to more convenient recycling options
  • help fight climate change by reducing greenhouse gas pollution that results from the landfilling of products that could otherwise be recycled or composted
  • overhaul Waste Diversion Ontario into the Resource Productivity and Recovery Authority, a strong oversight body with new compliance and enforcement powers that will oversee the new approach and existing waste diversion programs until transition is complete.

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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