Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Global warming (516)

Atlantic Ocean circulation at weakest in a millennium: scientists

The Guardian / Fiona Harvey / 25 February 2021

The Atlantic Ocean circulation that underpins the Gulf Stream, the weather system that brings warm and mild weather to Europe, is at its weakest in more than a millennium, and climate breakdown is the probable cause, according to new data.

Further weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) could result in more storms battering the UK, and more intense winters and an increase in damaging heatwaves and droughts across Europe.

Scientists predict that the AMOC will weaken further if global heating continues, and could reduce by about 34% to 45% by the end of this century, which could bring us close to a “tipping point” at which the system could become irrevocably unstable. A weakened Gulf Stream would also raise sea levels on the Atlantic coast of the US, with potentially disastrous consequences.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

UN report urges end to ‘suicidal’ war on nature

The Energy Mix / 22 February 2021

A landmark UN report has delivered a shattering synopsis of the three intertwined emergencies facing humanity—the climate crisis, a devastated natural world, and catastrophic air and water pollution—along with an authoritative and detailed blueprint for how to fix a “broken planet.”

At the launch of his organization’s “Making Peace with Nature” report, UN Secretary-General António Guterres declared that “humanity is waging war on nature” — a war he called “senseless and suicidal,” writes The Guardian. “Making peace with nature, securing its health, and building on the critical and undervalued benefits that it provides are key to a prosperous and sustainable future for all,” he said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Blackouts show US deeply unprepared for the climate crisis

The Guardian / Maanvi Singh / 19 February 2021

The crises in California and Texas are different, in scale and severity. One faced fire, the other an ice storm. But experts say the power outages in both states make one thing clear: neither is prepared for the chaos of the climate crisis.

“There’s a lot of similarities, between what has happened in Texas and California,” said Roshi Nateghi, a researcher at Purdue University who studies infrastructure sustainability and resilience. “In both cases, you had an extreme climate or weather event. And in both cases, the states were not prepared.”

Over the past two decades, across the United States, severe weather has been the main cause of sustained power outages, Nateghi said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Climate change, water quality, indigenous collaboration priorities for IJC Watersheds Initiative

International Joint Commission / Kevin Bunch / 16 February 2021

Ensuring that all boards are aware of how climate change may impact their responsibilities and work in the decades to come is another priority for the IJC. A Climate Change Guidance Framework developed as part of the IWI program is being used to help all IJC boards determine what climate-related risks may impact their mandates in coming years and how they can be addressed. As of January 2021, the St. Croix River Watershed Board has completed its assessment. Other assessments are in process for the Souris River Board, Osoyoos Lake Board of Control, Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board of Control and Lake Champlain-Richelieu River Study Board.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

OECD chief bows out with climate rally cry

The Guardian / 17 February 2021 / Fiona Harvey

“The single most urgent, emergent, immediate risk is to combat Covid-19, and its health, economic and social consequences,” [OECD secretary general Ángel Gurría] told the Guardian. “But the single most important intergenerational responsibility is to protect the planet … We are on a collision course with nature and we have to change course for future generations.”

[He] listed the ways in which the world needed to act: “To protect biodiversity, to stop it from being degraded; to protect soil; to protected lands and water; to protect the oceans from the worst overfishing; to protect coral reefs, which are in danger of disappearing at 2C [of global heating]; to protect mangroves, which are extraordinary carbon sinks; glaciers and so on.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

‘Hockey stick’ scientist talks about the ‘New Climate War’

CBC News / Bob McDonald / 29 January 2021

Climate scientist Michael Mann is possibly best known for the iconic “hockey stick” graph published in 1998 that showed the steep rise in planetary temperatures.

He was also one of the targets of a massive email hack dubbed “Climategate” aimed at discrediting climate scientists.

As a result of all this he gained an intimate knowledge of the strategies of those who are attempting to resist climate action — climate change deniers, and those trying to derail the political and social changes necessary to fight climate change.

Recently he’s started seeing those strategies shift. In his new book, The New Climate War, he lays out what he’s seeing, and what he thinks we need to do to preserve our planet. He spoke with Bob McDonald about his new book.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
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