Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Flooding (51)

Managing Climate Change and Variability Risks in the Great Lakes Region

GLISA / 2016

GLISA supports the region, as it charts its future, facing multiple and simultaneous changes and uncertainties. The Great Lakes region represents a unique socio-ecological system. Bound by the Lakes that shape both its culture and natural resources, Great Lakes communities have experienced dramatic changes in the past five decades, including deep economic downturn, population shifts, and negative environmental impacts. While climate change impacts are projected to exacerbate some of these challenges, leaders in the region are increasingly committed to a sustainable future by leveraging opportunities to mitigate climate impacts and adaptively respond to them.

As a boundary organization, GLISA produces and integrates information from a wide array of scientific fields, helps develop collaborations among stakeholders and organizations with similar goals, and provides climate information to support decision makers throughout the eight Great Lakes states and the province of Ontario.

[ FULL REPORT ]

No disaster aid for new homes in flood plains

The Energy Mix / Mitchell Beer / 07 February 2020

Canadians building or buying new homes in areas at high risk for flooding will no longer have access to federal disaster relief under a new insurance plan set to take effect in the next three years, The Energy Mix has learned.

The new high-risk insurance system, now under development by federal, provincial, and territorial governments, will “replace government assistance and ensure that those who are at high risk pay for their own risk,” said Craig Stewart, vice-president, federal affairs at the Insurance Bureau of Canada, in an interview on the sidelines of Nature Canada’s Nature-Based Climate Solutions Summit in Ottawa.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Background paper answers key questions on 2019 flooding

IJC - ILOSLRB / 23 January 2020

In an easy-to-read background paper on High Water in 2019, the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board responds to the call for more accessible information.

The paper uses question and answer format to explain why it flooded in 2019, why Lake Ontario outflows were not higher in 2018 and 2019, how the Board’s actions affected water levels, and what actions are being taken to reduce the risk of flooding in 2020 and beyond.

[ FULL ARTICLE ] [ BACKGROUND PAPER ]

IJC urges ‘more reliable’ solutions to high water

Recorder & Times / Sabrina Bedford / 12 December 2109

The International Joint Commission (IJC) is urging shoreline residents to find alternative ways to protect themselves from rising water since it has little influence over water levels throughout the system.

The binational organization said in an online seminar this week that water levels in the Great Lakes have been so high in the last few years, virtually nothing it can do will outmaneuver what Mother Nature has in store.

Jane Corwin, chairwoman of the United States section of the IJC, said the organization is “very concerned” about current water levels and the possibility of flooding next year, but the water management body has limited control over what can be done.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ WATER LEVELS WEBINAR ]

Lake Erie residents reckoning with worsening shoreline erosion

CBC News / Ellen Mauro / 06 December 2019

O’Brien lives on Erie Shore Drive, a stretch of road near Chatham-Kent in southwestern Ontario that was originally built as a dyke.

It’s prone to flooding, but O’Brien and her neighbours aren’t alone in their struggle. Many communities along Lake Erie have faced a challenging combination over the past year: record-high water levels and significant erosion of the shoreline.

This double whammy has caused property sizes to shrink as the lake swallows land, and has forced some homeowners to make the painful decision to either continue to try save and their lots or abandon them.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mental health expertise meets sandbags in building resilience

The Energy Mix / 04 December 2019

It was judicious use of mental health expertise, along with many, many sandbags, that enabled Fargo, North Dakota to weather the challenges of the epic 2009 Red River flood.

That was one of the experiences that pointed to a basic precondition for building communities’ ability to face the climate emergency: Recognizing climate change as a profound threat to mental health, responding with messages of “hopeful realism” and ongoing compassion, particularly for older adults and children, and helping communities acquire the psychological and social resilience to cope.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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