Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Flooding (51)

Conservation authorities group has too many developers, no local reps: mayor

CBC News / Bobby Hristova / 1 February 2021

Hamilton city councillors and the executive director of Environment Hamilton think recent changes by the province to conservation authorities will “decapitate” them and erode years of work to curb global warming and other environmental issues.

The most recent issue raised was how no one from Hamilton or Niagara are included in a provincial working group made following controversial legislation that governs conservation authorities.

Conservation authorities oversee regional environmental and watershed protection.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Warmer winters causing more ice-free lakes in N. Hemisphere

CBC News / Nicole Mortillaro / 23 December 2020

Climate change is having a widespread effect on lakes across the Northern Hemisphere, a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined 122 lakes from 1939 to 2016 in North America, Europe and Asia, and found that ice-free years have become more than three times more frequent since 1978.

These ice-free years not only threaten the livelihoods of people who depend on them, but they also have the potential to cause deep ecological impacts.

“Ecologically, ice acts as a reset button,” said Sapna Sharma, co-author of the study and an associate professor in the biology department at York University in Toronto.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Time to retreat from living on the riskiest waterfront land?

CBC News / Janet Davison / 18 July 2020

Across Canada, flooding has become the most expensive natural disaster, costing $1 billion annually in damage to homes, property and infrastructure, according to the federal Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

Insurers and many policy experts expect that number will go up. Sea levels are rising. A recent study by researchers at Environment and Climate Change Canada found that climate change has made rainfall more extreme and storms with extreme rainfall more frequent.

While experts see a variety of strategies to help deal with the situation, there is one potential solution people may not want to talk about: When might it be time to retreat from living on the riskiest waterfront properties altogether?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Regions brace to fight rising floodwaters and COVID-19

Toronto Star / Laura Osman / 28 March 2020

The last couple of years have taken on a biblical tone in the rural Pontiac region of Quebec.

The small community of about 6,000 has recovered from five natural disasters in just two years. Floods and microbursts have wiped out homes, roads and culverts. Last year’s tornado was the cherry on the cake.

“Our little municipality has become experts at managing crises,” said Mayor Joanne Labadie.

But nothing could prepare them for the possibility of fighting another flood with a global pandemic on their doorstep, she said.

Still, they’re getting ready as best they can.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Minister’s statement on St. Lawrence flooding

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 12 March 2020

The statement from [federal Public Safety Minister Bill] Blair’s office, sent Thursday evening, tied the flooding to climate change, which “is making natural disasters more severe, more frequent, more damaging and more expensive.”

“We need to find innovative and sustainable ways to mitigate the impact of these natural disasters, and to strike a better balance of responsibility for the incurred costs,” it added.

The government is working with other levels of government, academia, indigenous partners, non-governmental organizations and industry leaders to boost flood resilience “and empower everyone to mitigate flood risk,” the statement continued.

“We are also working toward creating a new low-cost national flood insurance program to protect homeowners who are at high risk of flooding and lack adequate insurance protection. We’re also developing a national action plan to assist homeowners at high repeat flood risk, as well as completing flood maps for all of Canada.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Along the Great Lakes, it’s time to prepare for extremes

New York Times / Peter Annin / 13 February 2020

The relentless high water is bound to bring more strife this year even as officials along the Great Lakes continue to promote climate adaptation strategies and resiliency. Armoring the shoreline is one form of adaptation. Property buyouts are another. History will show which strategy is most effective over time. What’s clear is that some people have built too close to the water’s edge. Their property was fine during low water, and they managed to hang on during the record high water of the 1980s, but today’s weather patterns have brought panic.

The devastation has been remarkably widespread, with properties sliding into the lakes from one end of the expansive watershed to the other. In this new era of extremes, property owners, taxpayers — and the officials they elect — will need to take a serious look at their lakefronts and decide whether armoring up is a wise investment, or a Sisyphean venture.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
TB Projects

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