Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Biodiversity (163)

Maitland Tower: History, nature, community, social enterprise

River Institute / 21 March 2021

The Maitland Tower is an iconic landmark east of Brockville on the St. Lawrence River with a storied past that dates back to the 1750’s. In 2016 Philip Ling bought the Maitland Tower site, and started the restoration of the historic buildings. The site will become a hub for the community, connecting people with the history, nature, and the St. Lawrence River, and hosting and mentoring the next generation of social enterprises that want to have a positive impact on the community and our planet.

Sustainable North Grenville: Where We Started

North Grenville Times / 14 April 2021

In honour of Earth Day, and in lieu of the cancelled Sustainability Fair (we miss it too!), Sustainable North Grenville is releasing a series of articles, beginning today with ‘Where We Started’, a pocket history introduction. Next week look for ‘Where We Are Now?’, complete with our ‘State of NG’ community report card. The following week we finish with ‘Where to Next?’, mapping next steps to ensure a more sustainable future for North Grenville.

Sustainable North Grenville (or ‘SNG’) is your local citizen action group whose goals are to promote all things ‘Sustainable’ in the context of three values:

Our Community: To strengthen the resilience of our community at large – culturally and socially – by a number of measures, including better communication (‘knowing our neighbours’) and, of course, by having fun together!

The Environment: To raise awareness of environmental issues in our community with a mix of education and action.

Local Economy: To support and promote the principles of sustainable community economic development – living and breathing the ‘buy local’ philosophy.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Exploring timelapse in Google Earth

Google / 15 April 2021

See humanity’s impact on the Earth through a global time-lapse video of the planet since 1984.

UN report urges end to ‘suicidal’ war on nature

The Energy Mix / 22 February 2021

A landmark UN report has delivered a shattering synopsis of the three intertwined emergencies facing humanity—the climate crisis, a devastated natural world, and catastrophic air and water pollution—along with an authoritative and detailed blueprint for how to fix a “broken planet.”

At the launch of his organization’s “Making Peace with Nature” report, UN Secretary-General António Guterres declared that “humanity is waging war on nature” — a war he called “senseless and suicidal,” writes The Guardian. “Making peace with nature, securing its health, and building on the critical and undervalued benefits that it provides are key to a prosperous and sustainable future for all,” he said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

OECD chief bows out with climate rally cry

The Guardian / 17 February 2021 / Fiona Harvey

“The single most urgent, emergent, immediate risk is to combat Covid-19, and its health, economic and social consequences,” [OECD secretary general Ángel Gurría] told the Guardian. “But the single most important intergenerational responsibility is to protect the planet … We are on a collision course with nature and we have to change course for future generations.”

[He] listed the ways in which the world needed to act: “To protect biodiversity, to stop it from being degraded; to protect soil; to protected lands and water; to protect the oceans from the worst overfishing; to protect coral reefs, which are in danger of disappearing at 2C [of global heating]; to protect mangroves, which are extraordinary carbon sinks; glaciers and so on.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

500+ scientists demand stop to tree burning as climate solution

Common Dreams / Andrea Germanos / 12 February 2021

Referring to forest “preservation and restoration” as key in meeting the nations’ declared goals of carbon neutrality by 2050, the letter frames the slashing of trees for bioenergy as “misguided.”

“We urge you not to undermine both climate goals and the world’s biodiversity by shifting from burning fossil fuels to burning trees to generate energy,” the group wrote.

The destruction of forests, which are a carbon sink, creates a “carbon debt.” And though regrowing “trees and displacement of fossil fuels may eventually pay off this carbon debt,” the signatories say that “regrowth takes time the world does not have to solve climate change.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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