Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Wellness (49)

Special items to borrow at the BPL

Transition Brockville / 08 July 2017

Our community partner, the Brockville Public Library, doesn’t just lend books. Over recent years, it has expanded its work with a variety of innovative programs, a few of which are described below.

Discounted Aquatarium Passes

Take your family to discover the Aquatarium! The pass gives access to a family of five (5) at $5.00 + tax per person. Please note the pass does not include the Ropes Course or the Aqua Drop.

Community Tackle Box

Fishing rods and tackle boxes are available to sign out for free. Equipment is available for a one week loan period. Customers are responsible for their own licenses. For resources on fishing licenses and regulations, click here.

A special thank you to Canadian Tire Brockville and the Friends of the Brockville Public Library for sponsoring the fishing rod and tackle borrowing program!

MAPsacks!

Look for our three (3) bright orange MAPsacks, check one out and go outside! A MAPsack is a backpack containing stories, nature guides, activity sheets, a logbook and a free family pass to enjoy the Rideau Valley Conservation Areas and Parks Ontario family pass. MAPsacks is a joint library project created by the Leeds-Grenville Stewardship Council and Rideau Lakes Public Library as part of the Lanark, Leeds and Grenville Healthy Communities Partnership. The MAPsacks are a rotating collection among the Libraries of Leeds & Grenville so watch for other sacks!

The loan period for MAPsacks is one week. When you return your MAPsack check the inventory list to ensure all of the items are returned.

Pedometers

The Library has pedometers for you to borrow for one (1) week. The pedometer kits, located at our lower level customer service desk, includes one (1) digital pedometer, a log/info sheet and a local trail map.

[ BPL WEBSITE ]

Can living with less make you happier?

The Guardian / Fumio Sasaki / 12 April 2017

Minimalism is a lifestyle in which you reduce your possessions to the least possible. Living with only the bare essentials has not only provided superficial benefits such as the pleasure of a tidy room or the simple ease of cleaning, it has also led to a more fundamental shift. It’s given me a chance to think about what it really means to be happy.

We think that the more we have, the happier we will be. We never know what tomorrow might bring, so we collect and save as much as we can. This means we need a lot of money, so we gradually start judging people by how much money they have. You convince yourself that you need to make a lot of money so you don’t miss out on success. And for you to make money, you need everyone else to spend their money. And so it goes.

So I said goodbye to a lot of things, many of which I’d had for years. And yet now I live each day with a happier spirit. I feel more content now than I ever did in the past.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Despair is not a strategy: 15 principles of hope

medium.com / Abby Brockman / 06 March 2017

If you’re out there trying to change your neighborhood, community, city, country, or the world then this is for you. In moments when everything seems hopeless, read this to get your hope on.

1. Hope can co-exist with other feelings. Grief and hope can co-exist. Fear and hope can co-exist. Disappointment and hope can co-exist. Sadness and hope can co-exist. As poet Yehuda Amichai writes, “A man doesn’t have time in his life to have time for everything. He doesn’t have seasons enough to have a season for every purpose. Ecclesiastes was wrong about that. A man needs to love and to hate at the same moment, to laugh and cry with the same eyes, with the same hands to throw stones and to gather them, to make love in war and war in love.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Latest research uncovers new risks of GMOs, glyphosate

The Organic & Non-GMO Report / Ken Roseboro / 26 January 2017

Within just a few weeks, two studies were published in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that cast new doubts on the safety of genetically modified foods and glyphosate herbicide. The first found that a genetically modified corn, NK 603, was not substantially equivalent to a non-GMO counterpart, which is contrary to claims of GMO proponents. The second study found that glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, can cause a serious liver disease at doses thousands of times lower than that allowed by law.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Processed foods drive surge in obesity rates

United Nations News Centre / 19 January 2017

The FAO/PAHO report points out that one of the main factors contributing to the rise of obesity and overweight has been the change in dietary patterns. Economic growth, increased urbanization, higher average incomes and the integration of the region into international markets have reduced the consumption of traditional preparations and increased consumption of ultra-processed products, a problem that has had greater impact on areas and countries that are net food importers.

To address this situation, FAO and PAHO call for the promotion of healthy and sustainable food systems that link agriculture, food, nutrition and health.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Glyphosate: Unsafe on any plate

Peak Prosperity / Dave Murphy / 01 January 2017

Dave Murphy, executive director of Food Democracy Now!, joins us this week to explain the finding of this new report on the world’s most-used herbicide (more commonly known by its retail brand: Roundup). As happened in past decades with the alcohol and tobacco industries, there’s compelling evidence that profits have taken a priority over consumer safety — and as public health concerns are being raised, Big Ag is circling its wagons and attacking the questioners rather than embracing open scrutiny.

«page 1 of 9

The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.