Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Wellness (69)

How to be eco-friendly in a pandemic

The Guardian / Emine Saner / 29 July 2020

With planes grounded, roads clear, emissions slashed and less noise and light pollution, at first it seemed the coronavirus pandemic might have an environmental benefit. But now the temporary respite is over and, as we venture back outside, it is clear that in other ways, things have got worse. Online shopping (with its excess packaging), disposable masks and gloves, the manufacture of visors and screens and an increase in takeaway food and drink have meant a boom in plastic just as people were starting to wake up to its environmental impact. The International Solid Waste Association estimates that single-use plastic has grown by up to 300% in the US. Some of it is necessary for now – the disposable personal protective equipment (PPE) that health and care workers use, for instance – but for the rest of us, if we are to live with this pandemic for the foreseeable future, it’s probably time to get into better habits. Here is some advice from experts.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Coronavirus, climate change: Dealing with converging crises

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists / Dawn Stover / 8 July 2020

Like climate change, the pandemic seemed distant and unreal until it was already upon us. Now both urgently require a society-wide response. Scientists have offered clear recommendations about how to solve these problems. However, the coronavirus won’t subside without broad social cooperation on behaviors such as physical distancing, mask wearing, and hand washing—an expanded version of the neighborly help that solved my electrical problem.

Similarly, the climate won’t heal without a new “healthcare system” for the planet that has strong support from the general public. It shouldn’t take another year of killer heat waves, mega-fires, and other disasters to convince Americans that we’ll never get back to “normal” by ignoring what’s happening around us.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

World health leaders urge green recovery from coronavirus

The Guardian / Fiona Harvey / 26 May 2020

Doctors and medical professionals from around the globe have called on world leaders to ensure a green recovery from the coronavirus crisis that takes account of air pollution and climate breakdown.

More than 200 organisations representing at least 40 million health workers – making up about half of the global medical workforce – have signed an open letter to the G20 leaders and their chief medical advisers, pointing to the 7 million premature deaths to which air pollution contributes each year around the world.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Feds unveil new COVID-19 stream for provincial infrastructure

National Post / Mia Rabson / 12 May 2020

“We have adapted our infrastructure program to the new reality of COVID,” said [Infrastructure Minister Catherine] McKenna.

It will include things like retrofitting health-care facilities and schools, particularly with a view to allowing for more physical distancing and making it easier to practise good hygiene like handwashing. Projects to help people find ways to get outside safely will also be a priority, such as new or better paths, bike lanes, and nature trails.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Gardens sprouting up as pandemic keeps us closer to home

CBC News / Hallie Cotnam / 16 May 2020

They’re sprouting up all over Ottawa this spring: raised gardens in the backyard and converted flower beds in the front, re-tooled to grow fresh produce close to home.

Urban gardening may be the new sourdough and seeds the new toilet paper as families seek to grow fresh food in the safe confines of their own property.

Social media feeds are full of garden boxes for sale. Giant cubes of soil squat in driveways, waiting for this weekend, or perhaps warmer weather.

Interest in the Edible Ottawa Gardens Group has exploded since the arrival of COVID-19, with membership blossoming from 3,000 to 4,600 in just two months, Valerie Sharp, one of the group’s administrators. She said most of them are new to gardening, many using the opportunity to spend more quality time outside with their families.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Health Unit and farmers’ markets are working together

LGL District Health Unit / 7 May 2020

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark [District Health Unit] strongly supports local Farmers’ Markets. They encourage people to buy healthy local food, and are a way for farmers to sell their produce. They have also been a social gathering place which supports individual and community well-being. Unfortunately at this time, with COVID-19, where social gatherings used to be a strength, they now pose a risk to both the vendors and the people who come to the market.

The provincial government has allowed Farmers’ Markets to open under the agricultural exemption to the provincial emergency directives. The provincial directive about avoiding gatherings of more than 5 people still applies.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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