Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Wellness (72)

How a famous tree scientist seeks well-being in nature during the pandemic

The Tyee / Andrew Nikiforuk / 31 December 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic will not end tomorrow. Vaccines, which will also put pressure on the virus to mutate further, will not reach the majority of the population until late summer or fall — if we are lucky. Which means we are in for more anxious months as we wait to know our collective fate.

Having had the privilege to spend time last year with the brilliant botanist Diana Beresford-Kroeger, I checked in with her and found her, as well, asking, “How do we keep well in a time of extra worry during a pandemic?”

The answer, she says, is simple: recalibrate your life, slow down and take advantage of nature’s bountiful remedies during a time of disquiet and unease. Among Beresford-Kroeger’s books are To Speak for the Trees and The Sweetness of the Simple Life. Given her intimate knowledge of trees, not surprisingly, the author and scientist seeks in their presence calm and, she says, physiological benefits.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Could COVID lockdown have helped save the planet?

The Guardian / Jonathan Watts / 29 December 2020

When lockdown began, climate scientists were horrified at the unfolding tragedy, but also intrigued to observe what they called an “inadvertent experiment” on a global scale. To what extent, they asked, would the Earth system respond to the steepest slowdown in human activity since the second world war?

Environmental activists put the question more succinctly: how much would it help to save the planet?

Almost one year on from the first reported Covid case, the short answer is: not enough. In fact, experts say the pandemic may have made some environmental problems worse, though there is still a narrow window of opportunity for something good to come from something bad if governments use their economic stimulus packages to promote a green recovery.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Bill 216, Food Literacy for Students Act

Daryl Kramp, MPP / 18 December 2020

How to be eco-friendly in a pandemic

The Guardian / Emine Saner / 29 July 2020

With planes grounded, roads clear, emissions slashed and less noise and light pollution, at first it seemed the coronavirus pandemic might have an environmental benefit. But now the temporary respite is over and, as we venture back outside, it is clear that in other ways, things have got worse. Online shopping (with its excess packaging), disposable masks and gloves, the manufacture of visors and screens and an increase in takeaway food and drink have meant a boom in plastic just as people were starting to wake up to its environmental impact. The International Solid Waste Association estimates that single-use plastic has grown by up to 300% in the US. Some of it is necessary for now – the disposable personal protective equipment (PPE) that health and care workers use, for instance – but for the rest of us, if we are to live with this pandemic for the foreseeable future, it’s probably time to get into better habits. Here is some advice from experts.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Coronavirus, climate change: Dealing with converging crises

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists / Dawn Stover / 8 July 2020

Like climate change, the pandemic seemed distant and unreal until it was already upon us. Now both urgently require a society-wide response. Scientists have offered clear recommendations about how to solve these problems. However, the coronavirus won’t subside without broad social cooperation on behaviors such as physical distancing, mask wearing, and hand washing—an expanded version of the neighborly help that solved my electrical problem.

Similarly, the climate won’t heal without a new “healthcare system” for the planet that has strong support from the general public. It shouldn’t take another year of killer heat waves, mega-fires, and other disasters to convince Americans that we’ll never get back to “normal” by ignoring what’s happening around us.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

World health leaders urge green recovery from coronavirus

The Guardian / Fiona Harvey / 26 May 2020

Doctors and medical professionals from around the globe have called on world leaders to ensure a green recovery from the coronavirus crisis that takes account of air pollution and climate breakdown.

More than 200 organisations representing at least 40 million health workers – making up about half of the global medical workforce – have signed an open letter to the G20 leaders and their chief medical advisers, pointing to the 7 million premature deaths to which air pollution contributes each year around the world.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
TB Projects

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