Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Wellness (48)

Exercise is the best anti-aging therapy

CBC Radio / Bob McDonald / 09 March 2018

The multi-billion dollar anti-aging industry provides a cornucopia of products that promise to fight off the ravages of time with special food supplements, diets, creams, oxygenated water and a host of gadgets that supposedly remove toxins from the body. It makes it sound like all we need to do is pop a pill and our lives will be extended.

And when our bodies do begin to slow down and diseases creep in, another huge industry of pharmaceuticals and therapies take over to fight it off. Our aging society is spending a lot of money trying to fight off old age. But the cheapest and oldest therapy for an aging body is good old exercise. Sadly it’s the one prescription many people are not taking.


Are pickles fermented? Pickled vs. fermented foods

Mother Earth News / Chelsea Clark / 11 May 2015

Since I discovered the various health benefits of fermented foods, I have become a complete fan of these sour, delicious treats. I have learned to make my own fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, sourdough bread, and more. But when it comes to grabbing a fermented snack from the grocery store, choosing the right product can be confusing. So what are fermented foods, exactly? And are pickles fermented, or are pickled foods different from fermented foods? These types of questions shouldn’t be ignored; there is a crucial difference between pickled and fermented foods that impacts their nutritive value.


All you need to know to eat good, grass-fed meat

Mother Earth News / June/July 2012 / Deborah Krasner

Beef and other ruminants are generally called “grass-fed,” while pork and poultry are referred to as “pastured” or “free-range.” The essential point is that these animals spend their whole lives eating what they were designed by nature to eat and getting exercise, fresh air and sunlight. They tend to be healthy, with no need for antibiotics or other drugs. Because they range through rotating pastures, they aren’t stressed or crowded. When grass-fed animals are allowed to grow slowly and naturally to the appropriate processing weight, they don’t need growth hormones.

Pastured animals produce manure that enriches the fields they roam on and nourishes birds, promoting a diverse ecosystem. Grass-fed meat and milk are increasingly recognized as healthier and consistently lower in bad fat than industrial products.


Is climate change making you sick?

CBC News / 02 November 2017

Dr. Courtney Howard discusses her new report on how climate change is affecting Canadians’ physical and mental health.

Township buys Kemptville College for sustainability hub

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 08 November 2017

North Grenville has reached a deal to buy the former Kemptville College campus from the provincial government. The agreement in principle announced Wednesday would see the municipality assume ownership of most of the 633-acre campus with more than 50 buildings to transform it into an “education and community hub.”

“The is great news,” said North Grenville Mayor Dave Gordon. “For starters it brings back North Grenville College to the residents of North Grenville. It gives us the opportunity to create an economic hub for the North Grenville area.”

Brian Carre, chief executive officer of North Grenville, said the municipality will own the land and the buildings but a not-for-profit group will run the hub.

Carre said the hub will focus on such green initiatives as climate-change adaptation, low carbon studies and agriculture resiliency. […] As an example, Carre cited an agency that works with post-traumatic stress disorder patients through gardening therapy. The gardening program would dovetail well with the hub’s environmental focus.


Fermented oat porridge recipe

Mother Earth News / Sandor Ellix Katz / August 2016

Fermentation can add new dimensions to grain porridges. A 12- to 24-hour soak will increase digestibility and creaminess without altering flavor.

Sally Fallon, author of the pro-fermentation cookbook Nourishing Traditions, is emphatic about soaking grains to make them digestible. “The well-meaning advice of many nutritionists, to consume whole grains as our ancestors did and not refined flours and polished rice, is misleading and often harmful in its consequences; for while our ancestors ate whole grains, they did not consume them as presented in our modern cookbooks in the form of quick-rise breads, granolas, and other hastily prepared casseroles and concoctions. Our ancestors, and virtually all preindustrialized peoples, soaked or fermented their grains before making them into porridge, breads, cakes, and casseroles.”


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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

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