Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Waste reduction (13)

Where do you keep your compost bin?

treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 01 December 2017

The location of a compost bin could be affecting your willingness to use it. A group of researchers from the University of British Columbia found that the closer a main collection bin is to one’s door, the more likely one is to use it. While this is a logical and unsurprising conclusion, it’s interesting to see how small the changes have to be in order to make a big difference.

The 10-week study took place in several high-density residential buildings in Vancouver. Compost and recycling bins were placed in three locations — the garbage disposal area (least convenient), at the bottom of the elevator (somewhat convenient), and just outside the doors of individual suites (most convenient).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

6 tips for a green Christmas

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Tuohy / 31 October 2017

Have a green Christmas this holiday season with decorations and celebrations designed to reduce waste while still conveying the spirit of the season.

Skip the Wrapping Paper

Don’t wrap gifts in single-use paper — it’s one of the largest contributors to waste during the holidays. Turn old maps, magazines, and book pages into creative gift wrap. Make reusable wrapping bags out of fabric in a few different sizes or purchase sturdy gift bags that can be used several times before recycling. For gifts that need traditional wrapping paper, opt for gift wrap made with recycled content.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Organics first step to zero waste

Green Communities Canada / GCNews / November 2017

The first step in achieving Ontario’s ambitious goal of zero waste is to get food waste and organics out of landfill. So says a new report from the the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario.

“It’s true,” says Laurie Westaway, former of the Green Communities Foundation. “Recycling alone will not answer or solve waste issues,” says Westaway, who works as a waste management consultant.

“What I find fascinating is that we require so much packaging to ‘protect’ our health,” she says. “Then we create health and environmental concerns with disposing of the packaging.”

“We are killing ourselves by attempting to protect ourselves.”

[ FULL ECO REPORT ]

To cure affluenza, let’s be satisfied with stuff we already own

The Guardian / Richard Denniss / 29 October 2017

Our embrace of “convenience” and our acceptance of our inability to plan ahead is an entirely new way of thinking, and over the past seventy years we have built a new and different economic system to accommodate it.

There is nothing inevitable about this current way of thinking, consuming and producing. On the contrary, the vast majority of humans who have ever lived (and the majority of humans alive today) would find the idea of using our scarce resources to produce things that are designed to be thrown away absolutely mad.

But the fact that our consumer culture is a recent innovation does not mean it will be easy to change. Indeed, the last few decades have shown how contagious affluenza can be. But we have not always lived this way, which proves that we don’t have to persist with it. We can change – if we want to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Trailblazing with an awesome, zero-waste grocery store

National Observer / Elizabeth McSheffrey / 08 March 2017

Nu Grocery hasn’t opened yet, but once Leloup finalizes lease negotiations, she expects to launch sometime this summer. She’s keeping the location a secret until then, but said the one-stop shop will sell everything in bulk from dry goods to beauty products. Customers are invited to bring their own containers, borrow them from the store using a deposit, or buy containers when they get there.

It’s still in the “implementation phase,” said Leloup, and she wasn’t immediately able to say when she expected to break even or make a profit. But already, the concept has received high praise from the Ottawa community. On Tuesday, she was awarded a Bootstrap Award for Community Impact, which celebrates entrepreneurs who are “working their tails off, self-financing and doing it the hard way.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ontario taking next step to go waste-free

Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change / 01 March 2017

Today, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change Glen Murray announced Ontario’s Strategy for a Waste-Free Ontario: Building the Circular Economy. This new strategy outlines the province’s plan to fight climate change by reducing landfilled materials that could otherwise be reused, recycled, composted and reintegrated into the economy.

The strategy includes 15 concrete actions to build up the province’s circular economy and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from landfills, such as:

  • Requiring producers to take full responsibility for the environmental and financial management of their products and packaging, including small appliances, electrical tools, batteries, fluorescent bulbs, mattresses, carpets, clothing and furniture
  • Implementing a framework to reduce the volume of food and organic waste going to landfill
  • Requiring industrial, commercial and institutional sectors to divert more of the waste they produce from landfills
  • Banning certain materials, such as food waste, beverage containers, corrugated cardboard and fluorescent bulbs and tubes, from disposal and driving creative strategies to reuse and recycle these items
  • Improving oversight and accountability in the waste management sector, including by requiring producers to register and report on their waste management activities

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

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