Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Voluntary simplicity (19)

65 tips to save money through self-reliance

Mother Earth News / Kale Roberts / February/March 2014

Throughout the years, MOTHER EARTH NEWS readers have proved to be a clever lot. You’ve shown time and again that you can save a bundle when you apply resourcefulness and a little elbow grease to home economics. Frankly, our consumer culture pressures many of us to live above our means. The good news is that making a personal and household commitment to a more frugal lifestyle can be a fulfilling, healthy choice — and the following tips to save money can start you on that journey. Imagine what your life will be like when you slash your grocery or utility bills in half, or when you’re able to pay down your mortgage.

We’ve assembled the following tips to save money from you, our readers, and from our Amazin’ Archive — 44 years’ worth of articles about living on less and loving it.

After you read our selections, find more details for how to implement the tips that interest you by clicking on the links that follow each tip.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Sustainable city living on 1/10th of an acre

Happen Films / 20 October 2018

This film tells the story of one small family practicing urban sufficiency. They live on 1/10th of an acre in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. By living more simply and utilizing alternative technologies this household draws 75-80% less electricity from the grid than the Australian average (per capita). At the same time they’re exporting five times that amount in solar energy back into the grid.

The inconvenient truth about convenience

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 22 February 2018

Do you throw clothes in the dryer instead of hanging them out? Do you buy takeout coffee on the run because you haven’t got the time to make your own? Do you put your kids in the car and drive them to school because you’re running late? Even when we know what is best, the vast majority of people still do what is easiest.

Ever since I read Wu’s thought-provoking article earlier this week, I’ve been mulling it over. It felt particularly relevant, since I just finished reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s classic Farmer Boy to my kids, which recounts a hard mid-19th-century farming life in upstate New York that is the antithesis of convenience. Everything takes an immense amount of work, and all tasks are interconnected and necessary for survival. I’ve realized that there are a number of ways in which convenience undermines humanity.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Greening your holiday

Green Communities Canada / GCNews / December 2017

Our member organizations have oodles of suggestions for greening your holiday.

If you are hosting a party, GreenUP, Peterborough, ON, suggests ways to decorate with nature, reduce food waste, save energy, and otherwise green your event.

EcoSuperior, Thunder Bay, ON, shares the top five ways to reduce holiday waste.

Green Calgary has great gift ideas that are unique and practical – like a clothes drying rack. Stainless steel straws, soap nuts, and the Green Calgary Recipe Book are other possibilities.

The December newsletter of Rideau Environmental Action League, Smiths Falls, ON, offers helpful advice on regifting, including advice on when it’s acceptable to regift a used item.

To cure affluenza, let’s be satisfied with stuff we already own

The Guardian / Richard Denniss / 29 October 2017

Our embrace of “convenience” and our acceptance of our inability to plan ahead is an entirely new way of thinking, and over the past seventy years we have built a new and different economic system to accommodate it.

There is nothing inevitable about this current way of thinking, consuming and producing. On the contrary, the vast majority of humans who have ever lived (and the majority of humans alive today) would find the idea of using our scarce resources to produce things that are designed to be thrown away absolutely mad.

But the fact that our consumer culture is a recent innovation does not mean it will be easy to change. Indeed, the last few decades have shown how contagious affluenza can be. But we have not always lived this way, which proves that we don’t have to persist with it. We can change – if we want to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

For some millennials, minimalism is the path to happiness

Globe & Mail / Brenda Bouw / 06 July 2017

Minimalism is striking a chord among millennials, many of who have grown up watching their parents work hard to buy stuff that isn’t making them happy, says Ryan Nicodemus, 35, the author, speaker, podcaster and filmmaker – along with childhood friend Joshua Fields Millburn – behind The Minimalists.

While millennials are sometimes stereotyped as being lazy and self-absorbed, many are simply rejecting societal norms around work and consumerism. Mr. Nicodemus says consumers have been sold “the American dream,” through advertising – that they’ll be happier with the right car, clothes and gadgets.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

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