Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Voluntary simplicity (17)

The inconvenient truth about convenience

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 22 February 2018

Do you throw clothes in the dryer instead of hanging them out? Do you buy takeout coffee on the run because you haven’t got the time to make your own? Do you put your kids in the car and drive them to school because you’re running late? Even when we know what is best, the vast majority of people still do what is easiest.

Ever since I read Wu’s thought-provoking article earlier this week, I’ve been mulling it over. It felt particularly relevant, since I just finished reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s classic Farmer Boy to my kids, which recounts a hard mid-19th-century farming life in upstate New York that is the antithesis of convenience. Everything takes an immense amount of work, and all tasks are interconnected and necessary for survival. I’ve realized that there are a number of ways in which convenience undermines humanity.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Greening your holiday

Green Communities Canada / GCNews / December 2017

Our member organizations have oodles of suggestions for greening your holiday.

If you are hosting a party, GreenUP, Peterborough, ON, suggests ways to decorate with nature, reduce food waste, save energy, and otherwise green your event.

EcoSuperior, Thunder Bay, ON, shares the top five ways to reduce holiday waste.

Green Calgary has great gift ideas that are unique and practical – like a clothes drying rack. Stainless steel straws, soap nuts, and the Green Calgary Recipe Book are other possibilities.

The December newsletter of Rideau Environmental Action League, Smiths Falls, ON, offers helpful advice on regifting, including advice on when it’s acceptable to regift a used item.

To cure affluenza, let’s be satisfied with stuff we already own

The Guardian / Richard Denniss / 29 October 2017

Our embrace of “convenience” and our acceptance of our inability to plan ahead is an entirely new way of thinking, and over the past seventy years we have built a new and different economic system to accommodate it.

There is nothing inevitable about this current way of thinking, consuming and producing. On the contrary, the vast majority of humans who have ever lived (and the majority of humans alive today) would find the idea of using our scarce resources to produce things that are designed to be thrown away absolutely mad.

But the fact that our consumer culture is a recent innovation does not mean it will be easy to change. Indeed, the last few decades have shown how contagious affluenza can be. But we have not always lived this way, which proves that we don’t have to persist with it. We can change – if we want to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

For some millennials, minimalism is the path to happiness

Globe & Mail / Brenda Bouw / 06 July 2017

Minimalism is striking a chord among millennials, many of who have grown up watching their parents work hard to buy stuff that isn’t making them happy, says Ryan Nicodemus, 35, the author, speaker, podcaster and filmmaker – along with childhood friend Joshua Fields Millburn – behind The Minimalists.

While millennials are sometimes stereotyped as being lazy and self-absorbed, many are simply rejecting societal norms around work and consumerism. Mr. Nicodemus says consumers have been sold “the American dream,” through advertising – that they’ll be happier with the right car, clothes and gadgets.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Voluntary simplicity: Resources

Transition Brockville / 05 May 2017

Here are resources — websites, books and videos — mentioned by TB Steering Committee member Christine Stesky in her presentation and discussion on voluntary simplicity on Sunday, April 23.

  • The Simplicity Collective

    Voluntary simplicity, or simple living, is a way of life that rejects the high-consumption, materialistic lifestyles of consumer cultures and affirms what is often just called ‘the simple life’ or ‘downshifting.’ The rejection of consumerism arises from the recognition that ordinary Western-style consumption habits are degrading the planet; that lives of high consumption are unethical in a world of great human need; and that the meaning of life does not and cannot consist in the consumption or accumulation of material things.

  • [ more… ]

Voluntary Simplicity, followed by a party

Transition Brockville / 11 April 2017

A vacation from our high-tech, high-pressure lives is always welcome. But what if we could make that freedom and contentment with life permanent, instead of returning to the rat race after a one- or two-week escape?

An alternative way of living, called Voluntary Simplicity – or sometimes the Simpler Way – will be discussed at the next Transition Brockville presentation on Sunday, April 23, 2 p.m., at the Brockville Public Library.

Chris Stesky, a member of the Transition Brockville steering committee, will introduce the concept, offer some insights from her experience, and invite the audience to share stories from their own journey toward a simpler life.

Following the discussion, everyone is invited to a celebrate Transition Brockville’s 10th anniversary. There will be a look back at the group’s history, appreciation of those who have contributed over the years, and a delicious cake and treats.

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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