Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Urban agriculture (6)

Reopening the penitentiary farms

Save Our Prison Farms committee / Dianne Dowling / 27 February 2018

Yahoooo! Today’s budget included a paragraph about the prison farms:

Reopening the Penitentiary Farms at Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions

To provide federal inmates with training opportunities to acquire new skills, while preparing for employment and successful reintegration and rehabilitation into the community, the Government proposes to invest $4.3 million over five years, beginning and 2018–19, to support the reopening of the Penitentiary Farms at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions in Kingston, Ontario. The farms would be run by CORCAN, a key rehabilitation programming agency of the Correctional Service of Canada.

from page 210 of the budget at https://www.scribd.com/document/372565383/Federal-Budget-2018#from_embed

The CSC prison farm advisory panel has a meeting next week, and I am hoping we will have more details from the Minister of Public Safety and CSC about what the farms will include.

Suggested action:

Please consider writing a letter or making a phone call of support and appreciation to any of the following: the Minister of Public Safety, the Prime Minister, other Cabinet ministers, any MP of your choice, a media outlet, etc. Supporting the decision to fund the restoration of the farms will assist in maintaining the government’s endorsement of the program, and, we hope, lead to additional funding in the future.

For humans, bugs and beauty: an urban food forest demo

Peak Moment TV / 16 September 2017

“This place is famous. People loving coming by here because at any time of year you can get something to eat.” Architect Mark Lakeman, co-founder of the City Repair project, gives a tour of the corner sidewalk outside his Portland office building, where a food forest is bursting with life.

Farming the neighborhood

Mother Earth News / Kristi Quillen, K.C. Compton / December 2016/January 2017

Sarah, her husband, Jeremiah, and their four daughters turned their lawn into garden and began growing their own food as a solution to the family’s health concerns and the cost of organic vegetables — and they achieved a lot at their 1⁄5-acre backyard homestead in Loveland, Colorado. In fact, they were among MOTHER’s 2014 Homesteaders of the Year. Eventually, though, they began to run out of space and dreamed of expanding, but couldn’t afford to buy a big piece of land.

“I was looking longingly at farms because of the space, but we love living in our neighborhood that’s so close to downtown,” Sarah says.

Then she had an idea: Why not farm the neighborhood?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Urban backyard farming for profit

Mother Earth News / Curtis Stone / October/November 2016

urban_farm-2In this excerpt from The Urban Farmer, courtesy of New Society Publishers, Curtis Stone offers an innovative approach to urban backyard farming for profit — one that doesn’t require starting with acres of land in the country. In these urban farming business plans, which are based on his own experience and which have been refined over years, Stone outlines how you can start a gardening business while still working a 9-to-5 job, and increase your commitment and profits over time.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Growing fresh veggies for the neighborhood

Peak Moment TV / 23 February 2015

Farm coordinator Scott Behmer gives us a tour of a derelict lot transformed into a small urban farm. In an area with widely diverse demographics, work trade volunteers help in the garden and take vegetables home with them. The children’s garden has “See, Touch, Taste, and Mint” beds with plants highlighting these themes.

How to Make a Fruit Picker

picker6Mother Earth News / A Dreyer / 13 November 2012

Are you tormented by ripe fruit that’s out of reach on high branches? Would you love to put that fruit to use, but just can’t get to it? Follow these easy instructions on how to make a fruit picker and you won’t have to watch fruit rot on a tree again.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

page 1 of 1

The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Area Community Gardens