Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Sea levels (17)

Flooding of coast, caused by global warming, has already begun

New York Times / Justin Gillis / 03 September 2016

OldTownAlexandriaFor decades, as the global warming created by human emissions caused land ice to melt and ocean water to expand, scientists warned that the accelerating rise of the sea would eventually imperil the United States’ coastline.

Now, those warnings are no longer theoretical: The inundation of the coast has begun. The sea has crept up to the point that a high tide and a brisk wind are all it takes to send water pouring into streets and homes.

Federal scientists have documented a sharp jump in this nuisance flooding — often called “sunny-day flooding” — along both the East Coast and the Gulf Coast in recent years. The sea is now so near the brim in many places that they believe the problem is likely to worsen quickly. Shifts in the Pacific Ocean mean that the West Coast, partly spared over the past two decades, may be hit hard, too.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ice melt, sea level rise and superstorms video abstract

Earth Institute Columbia University / James Hansen et al / 21 March 2016

Continued high fossil fuel emissions this century are predicted to yield: (1) cooling of the Southern Ocean, especially in the Western Hemisphere, (2) slowing of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation, warming of the ice shelves, and growing ice sheet mass loss, (3) slowdown and eventual shutdown of the Atlantic overturning circulation with cooling of the North Atlantic region, (4) increasingly powerful storms, and (5) nonlinearly growing sea level rise, reaching several meters over a time scale of 50-150 years. These predictions, especially the cooling in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic with markedly reduced warming or even cooling in Europe, differ fundamentally from existing climate change assessments.

Atlas for a Changing Planet

ESRI

Atlas for a Changing PlanetUnderstanding natural and human systems is an essential first step toward reducing the severity of climate change and adapting to a warmer future.

Maps and geographic information systems are the primary tools by which scientists, policymakers, planners, and activists visualize and understand our rapidly changing world. Spatial information informs decisions about how to build a better future.

[ WEBSITE ]

Warming seas and melting ice sheets

NASA Global Climate Change / Maria-Jose Viñas, Carol Rasmussen / 26 August 2015

2328_warming-seas-featureMAIN-768px-97Sea level rise is a natural consequence of the warming of our planet.

We know this from basic physics. When water heats up, it expands. So when the ocean warms, sea level rises. When ice is exposed to heat, it melts. And when ice on land melts and water runs into the ocean, sea level rises.

For thousands of years, sea level has remained relatively stable and human communities have settled along the planet’s coastlines. But now Earth’s seas are rising. Globally, sea level has risen about eight inches (20 centimeters) since the beginning of the 20th century and more than two inches (5 centimeters) in the last 20 years alone.

All signs suggest that this rise is accelerating.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The point of no return: Climate change nightmares already here

Rolling Stone / Eric Holthaus / 05 August 2015

NoReturn_SHistorians may look to 2015 as the year when shit really started hitting the fan. Some snapshots: In just the past few months, record-setting heat waves in Pakistan and India each killed more than 1,000 people. In Washington state’s Olympic National Park, the rainforest caught fire for the first time in living memory. London reached 98 degrees Fahrenheit during the hottest July day ever recorded in the U.K.; The Guardian briefly had to pause its live blog of the heat wave because its computer servers overheated. In California, suffering from its worst drought in a millennium, a 50-acre brush fire swelled seventyfold in a matter of hours, jumping across the I-15 freeway during rush-hour traffic. Then, a few days later, the region was pounded by intense, virtually unheard-of summer rains. Puerto Rico is under its strictest water rationing in history as a monster El Niño forms in the tropical Pacific Ocean, shifting weather patterns worldwide.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

U.S. electricity facilities less than 4′ above local high tide

Union of Concerned Scientists / 2014

Map-US-Electricity-Facilities-Less-Than-Four-Feet-Above-Local-High-Tide_Full-Size

Nearly 100 electricity facilities in the contiguous United States, including power plants and substations, are within four feet of high tide — and are therefore vulnerable to rising sea levels.

[ SOURCE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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