Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Resource depletion (47)

2021 Southam Lecture: “Energy Dead-Ends: Green Lies, Climate Change and Chaotic Transitions”

University of Victoria, Dept. of Writing / Andrew Nikiforuk / 17 November 2021

This is an insightful summary of the human predicament by Andrew Nikiforuk coincidentally presented at the time of BC’s initial flooding two weeks ago.

An award-winning author, journalist and contributing editor for The Tyee, Nikiforuk has written about the use — and abuse — of natural resources and wild landscapes in Canada for more than 30 years. His work — which has appeared in the nation’s leading publications — has earned numerous awards, including a Governor General’s Award for Nonfiction, the Rachel Carson Environment Book Award, and seven National Magazine Awards.

Although we hear almost nothing about it, the City of Brockville is currently updating its latest Official Plan, the one approved in 2012. The provincial government has mandated that municipal updates focus primarily on growth through the next 25 years.

Exploring timelapse in Google Earth

Google / 15 April 2021

See humanity’s impact on the Earth through a global time-lapse video of the planet since 1984.

UN report urges end to ‘suicidal’ war on nature

The Energy Mix / 22 February 2021

A landmark UN report has delivered a shattering synopsis of the three intertwined emergencies facing humanity—the climate crisis, a devastated natural world, and catastrophic air and water pollution—along with an authoritative and detailed blueprint for how to fix a “broken planet.”

At the launch of his organization’s “Making Peace with Nature” report, UN Secretary-General António Guterres declared that “humanity is waging war on nature” — a war he called “senseless and suicidal,” writes The Guardian. “Making peace with nature, securing its health, and building on the critical and undervalued benefits that it provides are key to a prosperous and sustainable future for all,” he said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Nature should be at the heart of economic planning: U.K. report

CBC News / The Associated Press / 2 February 2021

A report commissioned by the British government is urging a radical transformation in the way that countries around the world assess the state of their economies by elevating the natural world as a key element in their economic planning.

The review of the economics of biodiversity by Professor Partha Dasgupta concludes that nature needs to become as valued as traditional gauges of economic wealth such as profits in the future.

In the 600-page review that was commissioned in 2019 by Britain’s Treasury, the University of Cambridge economist warned that current economic growth and prosperity have “come at a devastating cost to nature.” He said declines in biodiversity and the environment’s ability to provide food, clean water and air are “fuelling extreme risk and uncertainty for our economies and well-being.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The ongoing collapse of the world’s aquifers

National Observer / Matt Simon / 21 January 2021

As California’s economy skyrocketed during the 20th century, its land headed in the opposite direction. A booming agricultural industry in the state’s San Joaquin Valley, combined with punishing droughts, led to the over-extraction of water from aquifers. Like huge, empty water bottles, the aquifers crumpled, a phenomenon geologists call subsidence. By 1970, the land had sunk as much as 28 feet in the valley, with less-than-ideal consequences for the humans and infrastructure above the aquifers.

The San Joaquin Valley was geologically primed for collapse, but its plight is not unique. All over the world — from the Netherlands to Indonesia to Mexico City — geology is conspiring with climate change to sink the ground under humanity’s feet. More punishing droughts mean the increased draining of aquifers, and rising seas make sinking land all the more vulnerable to flooding. According to a recent study published in the journal Science, in the next two decades, 1.6 billion people could be affected by subsidence, with potential loses in the trillions of dollars.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Telling others about peak oil and limits to growth

Energy Skeptic / 14 November 2020

Obviously the planet is finite. We’re using many times more oil than we’re discovering, and therefore at some point global oil production will peak and decline. Yet even in 2019 this reality is denied by most, so much so that low prices after the last financial crash caused by high oil prices, has led to the public buying gas guzzling light trucks and SUVs.

What follows are the experiences of members of several peak oil groups (energyresources, runningonempty, sfbayoil, and so on, most of them from 2000 to 2005) about their experiences of trying to tell friends and family about peak oil and limits to growth.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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