Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Regional (240)

Seedy Saturday a growing concern

Recorder & Times / Nick Gardiner / 10 March 2020

Organizers hope for great things to grow from Seedy Saturday’s free exchange of seeds and gardening tips at the Brockville Memorial Centre.

Plant seeds and gardening advice went hand-in-hand at the annual event and the growth of youth engagement was an encouraging sign for organizers with the Brockville Public Library and Transition Brockville.

“It’s great to see how many young people are here,” said library chief executive officer Emily Farrell, who exchanged seeds with people of all ages nurturing their green thumbs as sure signs of spring – a warm sun and bright skies – ruled the day.

Farrell said she is encouraged by a continuing community interest in all elements of gardening from composting to harvesting and how it bodes for a better future.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Minister’s statement on St. Lawrence flooding

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 12 March 2020

The statement from [federal Public Safety Minister Bill] Blair’s office, sent Thursday evening, tied the flooding to climate change, which “is making natural disasters more severe, more frequent, more damaging and more expensive.”

“We need to find innovative and sustainable ways to mitigate the impact of these natural disasters, and to strike a better balance of responsibility for the incurred costs,” it added.

The government is working with other levels of government, academia, indigenous partners, non-governmental organizations and industry leaders to boost flood resilience “and empower everyone to mitigate flood risk,” the statement continued.

“We are also working toward creating a new low-cost national flood insurance program to protect homeowners who are at high risk of flooding and lack adequate insurance protection. We’re also developing a national action plan to assist homeowners at high repeat flood risk, as well as completing flood maps for all of Canada.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Along the Great Lakes, it’s time to prepare for extremes

New York Times / Peter Annin / 13 February 2020

The relentless high water is bound to bring more strife this year even as officials along the Great Lakes continue to promote climate adaptation strategies and resiliency. Armoring the shoreline is one form of adaptation. Property buyouts are another. History will show which strategy is most effective over time. What’s clear is that some people have built too close to the water’s edge. Their property was fine during low water, and they managed to hang on during the record high water of the 1980s, but today’s weather patterns have brought panic.

The devastation has been remarkably widespread, with properties sliding into the lakes from one end of the expansive watershed to the other. In this new era of extremes, property owners, taxpayers — and the officials they elect — will need to take a serious look at their lakefronts and decide whether armoring up is a wise investment, or a Sisyphean venture.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Managing Climate Change and Variability Risks in the Great Lakes Region

GLISA / 2016

GLISA supports the region, as it charts its future, facing multiple and simultaneous changes and uncertainties. The Great Lakes region represents a unique socio-ecological system. Bound by the Lakes that shape both its culture and natural resources, Great Lakes communities have experienced dramatic changes in the past five decades, including deep economic downturn, population shifts, and negative environmental impacts. While climate change impacts are projected to exacerbate some of these challenges, leaders in the region are increasingly committed to a sustainable future by leveraging opportunities to mitigate climate impacts and adaptively respond to them.

As a boundary organization, GLISA produces and integrates information from a wide array of scientific fields, helps develop collaborations among stakeholders and organizations with similar goals, and provides climate information to support decision makers throughout the eight Great Lakes states and the province of Ontario.

[ FULL REPORT ]

Mark your calendar: 6th Annual Seedy Saturday, March 7

Transition Brockville / 31 January 2020

Counties adopt paved-shoulders policy

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 24 January 2020

The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville will begin paving the shoulders of major counties roads when they are rebuilt.

The paved-shoulders policy, long advocated by cyclists and safety experts, was approved unanimously by counties council this week.

Adding a 1.5-metre paved strip on each side of a new road would add about $35,000 per kilometre to construction costs, Arup Mukherjee, public works director, told council in a report.

And although the paved shoulders would be widely used by cyclists, Mukherjee cautioned that they wouldn’t be called bike lanes.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
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