Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Reduce (60)

Lack of tiny home legislation prompts big fights

Globe and Mail / Sharon Crowther / 02 December 2016

taylor-tiny-homeThe Tiny Home Alliance of Canada was formed in 2014 to meet the growing demand for information and resources among tiny-home owners and prospective tiny-home owners. Their mission statement is “research, education and effective change.”

And change could be imminent as amendments which acknowledge and accommodate micro-dwellings in the States look set to be accepted by the International Residential Building Code (IRC) before the year’s out.

“America is way ahead of us right now,” says Canadian Tiny Home Alliance member and owner of Canada’s largest tiny-homes listing site, Natalie Brake from Victoria. “We’re watching what they’re achieving very closely and hoping to replicate that success here in Canada within the next six to 12 months.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ See also: TINY HOMES ]

The sad slippery slope of bar soap

Treehugger / Melissa Breyer / 29 August 2016

soapAre bar soaps more of a hassle than liquid soaps? For a culture that covets convenience, sure. Liquid soaps are not messy, they don’t slip out of our hands, they don’t require a soap dish. But to my eyes this is a myopic take on things. If we consider that $2.7 billion was spent on liquid body wash alone in 2015 – even if we randomly (and generously) assign a cost of $10 per bottle – that’s 270,000,000 plastic bottles with pump parts that end up in the waste cycle. And remember that’s just body wash. While some people refill their dispensers and create less waste, it’s still decidedly more plastic than the paper wrapper of a soap bar.

Moreover, Huffington Post reports that the carbon footprint in general is 25 percent more for liquid soap over bar soap.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Is recycling worth it?

Mother Earth News / Joanna Poncavage / February/March 2015

recycling-centerSo, is recycling worth it? In short, yes. But, to keep it effective, the way we think about waste must shift away from mindless consumption. Even as we’re recycling more, we’re creating more garbage — 4.38 pounds per person per day in 2012, up 63 percent from 2.68 pounds in 1960. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the total amount of garbage for the same period increased by 183 percent, from 88.1 million tons in 1960 to 251 million tons in 2012.

To cut back on most materials, adopt a BYOC mentality: Bring Your Own Containers, such as cloth sacks or glass jars, to grocery stores for transporting produce, bulk foods, and meats and cheeses from the deli counter. Take containers to restaurants for carting home leftovers. Purchase reusable drink canisters. Try your hand at making your own condiments, body care concoctions and cleaning products. Read on to find extra reduction tips for when you can’t cut consumption.

When you do recycle, keep in mind that some substances are more worthwhile to recycle than others, depending on the energy required to extract the raw material, and the environmental footprint the substance leaves behind. Following is a list of materials, information about the worth of recycling each one, and tips for how to follow the Three R’s in the right order: reduce, reuse, and, finally, recycle.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Let’s Talk Trash!

Transition Brockville / 15 July 2016

SteamPunked Tea Pot Lamp_sOn a sunny summer Sunday afternoon, what could be more fun than taking the family cycling down the new Brock Trail extension to St. Lawrence Park for a swim, an ice cream cone and a good hands-on education in what’s trash and what’s recyclable among the stuff that clutters our homes and garages?

“Talking Trash,” a free public event being held the afternoon of July 24 in the West Pavilion at St. Lawrence Park will help everyone figure out where they can dispose of items from batteries to cell phones, old clothes to old paint. Come with photos or electronic images of the items you need to recycle or dispose of and show them to the city’s solid waste coordinator, Lyndsay Price.

Price is only one of the people who’ll be on hand that day to inspire citizens to reduce, re-use, recycle and properly dispose of stuff. Sponsored by Transition Brockville, Talking Trash also features a display of Tasha Thorpe’s “Steampunk” art from recycled items; Habitat for Humanity, which recycles household items and construction materials; and Butler’s Creek Community Garden, showing kids how to make seedling pots from recycled newsprint.

[ more… ]

Open house – Zero carbon build

Ecogen Energy

ecogenbuild open house 2012 06

[ MORE INFO ]

Ecotech myths and lessons from the past

LIFT Conference / Kris de Decker / 10 February 2016

The present-day approach towards a sustainable society is doomed to fail. The focus on sophisticated technology – electric and hybrid cars, energy-efficient devices, solar panels and wind turbines, for instance – has little or no effect because these green technologies require large amounts of energy and resources for their manufacture, which makes their development highly dependent on a continuous supply of fossil fuels. What we need to solve our problems is exactly the opposite: less sophisticated technology. There is a lot to learn from the past. While they often worked surprisingly good, most of low-tech solutions have been completely forgotten. In his speech, Kris de Decker explains that reverting to past technologies does not mean that we should go back to the Middle Ages. Rather, it means combining old tech with new knowledge and new materials, or applying old concepts and lost knowledge to modern technology.

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

 

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