Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Reduce (62)

Bulk Barn embraces the Zero Waste movement

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 26 January 2017

In glorious news for zero wasters, Canada’s largest bulk food chain will accept reusable containers and bags in all stores, starting the end of February.

In one fell swoop, Bulk Barn has revolutionized grocery shopping in Canada. The largest bulk food retailer in the country has just announced that it will accept reusable containers in all stores, starting February 24, 2017. This is a monumental victory for the Zero Waste movement in Canada, since Bulk Barn has 260 locations across the nation, many of which are in small communities without access to other zero waste-friendly stores.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

What is OLED lighting? And how is it different from LEDs?

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Tuohy (Home Depot) / 23 January 2017

In just a few years, LED lighting went from niche uses to mainstream. Helped in part by a significant drop in price, total installations of LED bulbs in American homes more than doubled from 77 million to 202 million in just one year. That figure is even more impressive when compared to the fewer than 400,000 installations in 2009.

But will this dramatic shift from one technology to another repeat itself? Will our 25-year life span LED lightbulbs be obsolete in 10 years when another hot new green technology comes along? We won’t have to wait another decade to find out. That new technology is already here: organic light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

15 ways to help reduce global carbon emissions

The Guardian / Chris Goodall / 19 January 2017

From cutting down on meat, to contacting your local representatives and investing in clean energy, here are 15 ways to help reduce global carbon emissions.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Lack of tiny home legislation prompts big fights

Globe and Mail / Sharon Crowther / 02 December 2016

taylor-tiny-homeThe Tiny Home Alliance of Canada was formed in 2014 to meet the growing demand for information and resources among tiny-home owners and prospective tiny-home owners. Their mission statement is “research, education and effective change.”

And change could be imminent as amendments which acknowledge and accommodate micro-dwellings in the States look set to be accepted by the International Residential Building Code (IRC) before the year’s out.

“America is way ahead of us right now,” says Canadian Tiny Home Alliance member and owner of Canada’s largest tiny-homes listing site, Natalie Brake from Victoria. “We’re watching what they’re achieving very closely and hoping to replicate that success here in Canada within the next six to 12 months.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ See also: TINY HOMES ]

The sad slippery slope of bar soap

Treehugger / Melissa Breyer / 29 August 2016

soapAre bar soaps more of a hassle than liquid soaps? For a culture that covets convenience, sure. Liquid soaps are not messy, they don’t slip out of our hands, they don’t require a soap dish. But to my eyes this is a myopic take on things. If we consider that $2.7 billion was spent on liquid body wash alone in 2015 – even if we randomly (and generously) assign a cost of $10 per bottle – that’s 270,000,000 plastic bottles with pump parts that end up in the waste cycle. And remember that’s just body wash. While some people refill their dispensers and create less waste, it’s still decidedly more plastic than the paper wrapper of a soap bar.

Moreover, Huffington Post reports that the carbon footprint in general is 25 percent more for liquid soap over bar soap.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Is recycling worth it?

Mother Earth News / Joanna Poncavage / February/March 2015

recycling-centerSo, is recycling worth it? In short, yes. But, to keep it effective, the way we think about waste must shift away from mindless consumption. Even as we’re recycling more, we’re creating more garbage — 4.38 pounds per person per day in 2012, up 63 percent from 2.68 pounds in 1960. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the total amount of garbage for the same period increased by 183 percent, from 88.1 million tons in 1960 to 251 million tons in 2012.

To cut back on most materials, adopt a BYOC mentality: Bring Your Own Containers, such as cloth sacks or glass jars, to grocery stores for transporting produce, bulk foods, and meats and cheeses from the deli counter. Take containers to restaurants for carting home leftovers. Purchase reusable drink canisters. Try your hand at making your own condiments, body care concoctions and cleaning products. Read on to find extra reduction tips for when you can’t cut consumption.

When you do recycle, keep in mind that some substances are more worthwhile to recycle than others, depending on the energy required to extract the raw material, and the environmental footprint the substance leaves behind. Following is a list of materials, information about the worth of recycling each one, and tips for how to follow the Three R’s in the right order: reduce, reuse, and, finally, recycle.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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