Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Reduce (83)

Single-use plastic ban coming in 2021

CBC News / Mia Rabson / 30 January 2020

A national ban on many single-use plastics is on track for next year after a government report concluded Thursday that there is more than enough evidence proving plastic pollution is harmful, Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson said.

“We will be moving towards a ban on harmful single-use plastics and we will be doing that in 2021,” said Wilkinson.

The federal Liberals promised last June they’d seek to ban plastic versions of a number of products, such as straws, take-out containers and grocery bags. The ban would happen under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, which requires a scientific assessment of the problem first.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Cities can’t be left holding bag for recycling crisis

Montreal Gazette / Allison Hanes / 20 January 2020

For more than 25 years now, the vast majority of the recycling collected by municipalities in Canada, the United States and Europe was shipped to China. As programs adopted a “single-stream” so citizens could toss everything together without having to sort plastic, glass and paper themselves, the different materials started to contaminate each other. As our reliance on disposable containers like coffee cups and water bottles grew, we essentially off-loaded the consequences of mass consumerism on China.

But China got fed up and announced a sweeping ban on recycling imports, sending the markets for milk cartons and yogurt tubs into a nosedive, and leaving cities with mounting piles of rubbish.

That, in a nutshell, is how we got to the point where municipal programs are collapsing, companies are folding, and the stuff citizens toss in the recycling bin in good faith is ending up in the landfill.

There’s no doubt it’s a crisis. But as [Montreal mayor Valérie] Plante said, it’s also an “incredible opportunity” to remake how we deal with waste from the ground up.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Sustainable Shift: Ignite Printing

Transition Brockville / 20 January 2020

Owners Tim and Jennifer Winter started their printing business in 2015 from their home, then moved to Perth Street, and a year and a half ago moved to the Towne Centre Plaza on Ormond Street, in the former UPS store. They asked that anything not taken by the former occupant be left so they could re-use as much as possible.

They kept the UPS countertops. Tim, “a huge recycler,” according to Jenn, used wood from UPS shelving to build a large work table, and repaired a paper folder. To furnish the office (desks, cabinets, chairs) they went to Habitat for Humanity and other used furnishing places, and found sources of used office supplies.

[ more… ]

McDonald’s still rejects reusable mugs — but promises change

CBC News / Sophia Harris / 15 January 2020

McDonald’s Canada plans to change its general policy of rejecting reusable mugs, a practice that has angered customers for years.

On Tuesday, the restaurant chain told CBC News that it hopes to have a new national policy in place by the end of February, which will allow customers to be served coffee or tea in their personal mug instead of a disposable cup.

“We listen to our guests, and we know this is an area of growing importance to Canadians,” said spokesperson Ryma Boussoufa in an email.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Make Your Own Laundry Soap redux

Transition Brockville / 10 January 2020

It bears repeating: renewables alone won’t end climate crisis

The Tyee / Andrew Nikiforuk / 19 November 2019

To [esteemed Canadian energy analyst David] Hughes, the implications are clear: “What this means is that we have to look at downsizing, degrowth, using less. The math doesn’t work to keep the party going with renewables.” Ecologist [William] Rees delivered the same message a week ago in The Tyee.

Note that Hughes is not saying we shouldn’t build lots of renewables. What he is saying is that we need to radically reduce energy consumption and use renewables to actually retire fossil fuel infrastructure. (To date, the evidence shows that we have largely used renewables to consume more energy.)

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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