Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Recycle (18)

How to make your home-based business greener

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Tuohy / 25 June 2018

Taking steps to make your business “greener” is a win/win. It can help your bottom line, improve your company’s image and promote a healthier planet. As the owner of a home-based business, you have an advantage over most companies: Your carbon footprint is already smaller thanks to cutting out a daily commute and the expense of heating, cooling and lighting an extra space. Use this head-start wisely and be sure to implement a “Green Policy,” even if you’re your only employee.

A Green Policy is a simple list of the things you do or plan to do in your office to achieve a more sustainable environment. Write it down and promote it on your website and in your company brochure to demonstrate to your clients and vendors the efforts you’re making. Here are some steps you can take and policies you can implement to make your home-based business a green one.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Impacts of China’s decision not to be global dumping ground

Transition Brockville / 16 April 2018

How might residential blue box recycling change following China’s decision to limit its intake of the world’s unwanted paper and plastic? What added costs might Brockville residents have to pay?

For the answers to these questions, Transition Brockville has invited Erik Lefebvre, district operations manager at Waste Management in Brockville, to give a talk at our next presentation, Sunday, April 22, at 2 p.m. in the Brockville Public Library. “Brockville is at the dead centre of what’s going on,” Lefebvre said in a conversation with Transition Brockville. In his talk, he’ll explain why.

As outlined in a recent CBC series on recycling, China was taking in about half the world’s unwanted paper and plastic for recycling when it decided last summer it would no longer be the global dump for some 20,000 tons of that material daily.

Sending recyclables to China was a cheap and easy solution for the developed world — including Canada — but a growing environmental nightmare for China. So last July, Beijing issued a list of 24 kinds of solid waste that it would no longer accept from the beginning of 2018. That includes textiles, mixed paper shipments and the low-grade polyethylene terephthalate used in plastic bottles, known as PET. It also imposed strict standards to avoid contaminated waste. China complained that too much of it came uncleaned and unsorted.

“[China’s new policy] is causing giant troubles for our industry,” Lefebvre said.

[ more… ]

Many Canadians are recycling wrong, and it’s costing us millions

CBC News / Emily Chung / 06 April 2018

Canadians are throwing too much garbage into their blue bins, sometimes out of laziness or ignorance, but sometimes with the best of intentions. And it’s costing recycling programs millions of dollars a year.

Even a few spoonfuls of peanut butter left in a jar can contaminate a tonne of paper and make it unmarketable — destined for the dump. Same for that glob of yogurt left in the bottom of the container.

“It’s shameful, it’s awful. In some instances almost one in three pounds of what goes in a blue box shouldn’t be there,” says Mark Badger, executive vice-president of Canada Fibers, which runs 12 plants that sort about 60 per cent of the curbside recycling collected in Ontario.

Contamination is the technical name for non-recyclable material or garbage in the recycling system, from leftover food in containers to non-recyclable plastic packaging to more obvious garbage such as clothing and propane tanks.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Your lifestyle is making blue box recycling unsustainable

CBC News / Emily Chung / 27 March 2018

Our changing lifestyles over the past few decades have dramatically altered the types of materials we put in blue bins.

And that’s led to flatlining recycling rates and ballooning costs for municipalities across Canada that are struggling to cope with the changes.

“It’s a really a perfect storm of crazy stuff going on that means that the blue box has huge challenges that it did not have 10 years ago,” says Maria Kelleher, principal of Toronto-based Kelleher Environmental, a consulting firm specializing in waste reduction and recycling research, strategy and program design.

The problem is that we’re now throwing out a huge variety of new types of packaging — mostly plastics, sometimes glued to other materials like metals — that recycling programs were never meant to deal with. Meanwhile, the materials that they were designed to collect, sort and resell make up a shrinking proportion of what comes in.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Changes coming to recycling

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 19 June 2017

Changes are coming to Brockville’s recycling programs, but city officials are waiting for the province to provide details.

City council’s finance, administration and operations committee on Tuesday will get an update from staff on the provincial government’s new legislative framework for managing waste, the Waste Free Ontario Act.

That act, notes the staff report, “aims for full producer responsibility for designated waste materials, meaning the producers of these materials would need to manage the recycling or end-of-life processes, or cover 100 per cent of the costs associated with managing the waste.”

The province’s aim, the city report notes, is to create a “circular economy.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Some surprises at Talking Trash

Transition Brockville / 08 August 2016

Talking Trash 2016 IMG_0383There were some surprises at the Talking Trash event, held in partnership with the City of Brockville on July 24. Did you know that take-out coffee cups are not recyclable? Lyndsay Price, the City’s solid waste officer, clarified the best handling for a number of items questioned by our visitors.

  • Waxed Paper: GARBAGE, as it cannot break down properly for the recycling. May be used for compost instead.
  • Plastic Bags: GARBAGE. Try to reduce plastic bag waste or reuse them if possible. Some stores also have special drop-offs for recycling plastic bags, so save them to drop-off next time you go in. Check out this website for further reference: http://www.plasticfilmrecycling.org/s01/s01_search.html.
  • Tin Foil: RECYCLE, if reasonably clean.
  • [ more… ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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