Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Peak oil (72)

2021 Southam Lecture: “Energy Dead-Ends: Green Lies, Climate Change and Chaotic Transitions”

University of Victoria, Dept. of Writing / Andrew Nikiforuk / 17 November 2021

This is an insightful summary of the human predicament by Andrew Nikiforuk coincidentally presented at the time of BC’s initial flooding two weeks ago.

An award-winning author, journalist and contributing editor for The Tyee, Nikiforuk has written about the use — and abuse — of natural resources and wild landscapes in Canada for more than 30 years. His work — which has appeared in the nation’s leading publications — has earned numerous awards, including a Governor General’s Award for Nonfiction, the Rachel Carson Environment Book Award, and seven National Magazine Awards.

Although we hear almost nothing about it, the City of Brockville is currently updating its latest Official Plan, the one approved in 2012. The provincial government has mandated that municipal updates focus primarily on growth through the next 25 years.

Telling others about peak oil and limits to growth

Energy Skeptic / 14 November 2020

Obviously the planet is finite. We’re using many times more oil than we’re discovering, and therefore at some point global oil production will peak and decline. Yet even in 2019 this reality is denied by most, so much so that low prices after the last financial crash caused by high oil prices, has led to the public buying gas guzzling light trucks and SUVs.

What follows are the experiences of members of several peak oil groups (energyresources, runningonempty, sfbayoil, and so on, most of them from 2000 to 2005) about their experiences of trying to tell friends and family about peak oil and limits to growth.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Solar is now ‘cheapest electricity in history’, confirms IEA

Carbon Brief / Josh Gabbatiss, Simon Evans / 13 October 2020

The world’s best solar power schemes now offer the “cheapest…electricity in history” with the technology cheaper than coal and gas in most major countries.

That is according to the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2020. The 464-page outlook, published today by the IEA, also outlines the “extraordinarily turbulent” impact of coronavirus and the “highly uncertain” future of global energy use over the next two decades.

Reflecting this uncertainty, this year’s version of the highly influential annual outlook offers four “pathways” to 2040, all of which see a major rise in renewables.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Nate Hagens on the coronavirus and the economy

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PCI Executive Director Asher Miller speaks with Nate Hagens on the near- and long-term implications of COVID-19 on the financial system, energy, and the overall economy. This was recorded on March 16, 2020.

The surplus energy that powers the world is declining

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Every once in while, when we have an exceptionally timely conversation, we’ll make it available to the public. And we’re doing that this week.

Chris caught petroleum geologist Art Berman right before he went on stage to deliver a presentation on the limitations of shale oil (his excellent slides can be found here). The world is finally starting to realize that the profit-making potential of this space was drastically over-hyped.

But more important, warns Art, is that the souring sentiment on shale oil is a reflection on the bigger challenge ahead of us: How we will power the world in a future of declining net energy?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Orphan wells: Alberta’s $47 billion problem

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“It’s been my concern for many years, as an advocate for landowners and farmers, that diligence by government and the oil industry was required to ensure that farmers and ranchers don’t get left with the legacy problems of old oil and gas wells,” said Keith Wilson, a lawyer known for his work on property rights.

He quoted a report by the C.D. Howe Institute that estimates more than 155,000 Alberta energy wells have no economic potential and will eventually require reclamation.

He also quoted Orphan Well Association figures that it costs an average of $304,448 to reclaim a well.

That math leads to a big number: $47.19 billion in future reclamation costs.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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