Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Local resilience (83)

Think Resilience: Preparing Communities for the Rest of the 21st Century

resilience.org

We live in a time of tremendous political, environmental, and economic upheaval, which begs a profoundly important question: What should we do? We at Post Carbon Institute believe that, among other things, two areas of engagement are absolutely critical:

  1. Understand the true nature of the challenges we as a society face. What are the underlying, systemic forces at play? What brought us to this place? Acting without this understanding is like putting a band-aid on a life-threatening injury.
  2. Build community resilience. While we must also act in our individual lives and as national/global citizens, building community resilience is our greatest means of mitigating and adapting to the 21st century’s sustainability crises.

We’re offering this course — Think Resilience: Preparing Communities for the Rest of the 21st Century — to help you get started. You can either take it (consisting of 22 video lectures by Post Carbon Institute Senior Fellow Richard Heinberg, totaling about 4 hours) at your own leisure or participate in a six week long guided course, facilitated by Richard himself.

[ COURSE WEBSITE ]

How people can truly take back control: from the bottom up

The Guardian / George Monbiot / 08 February 2017

There are hundreds of examples of how this might begin, such as community shops, development trusts, food assemblies (communities buying fresh food directly from local producers), community choirs and free universities (in which people exchange knowledge and skills in social spaces). Also time banking (where neighbours give their time to give practical help and support to others), transition towns (where residents try to create more sustainable economies), potluck lunch clubs (in which everyone brings a homemade dish to share), local currencies, Men’s Sheds (in which older men swap skills and escape from loneliness), turning streets into temporary playgrounds (like the Playing Out project), secular services (such as Sunday Assembly), lantern festivals, fun palaces and technology hubs.

Turning such initiatives into a wider social revival means creating what practitioners call “thick networks”: projects that proliferate, spawning further ventures and ideas that weren’t envisaged when they started. They then begin to develop a dense, participatory culture that becomes attractive and relevant to everyone rather than mostly to socially active people with time on their hands.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2017 – A sea of exponentials

Peak Prosperity / Chris Martenson / 31 December 2016

“The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function.” ~ Al Bartlett

Perhaps the most vexing challenge remains how to more effectively communicate the various predicaments and problems we face.

It’s not having more numbers, or more data, that’s for sure. If numbers and data worked then we’d have taken a very different path sometime back in the 1950’s.

As Admiral Hyman Rickover said in a speech to a group of doctors in 1957:

“I think no further elaboration is needed to demonstrate the significance of energy resources for our own future. Our civilization rests upon a technological base which requires enormous quantities of fossil fuels. What assurance do we then have that our energy needs will continue to be supplied by fossil fuels: The answer is – in the long run – none.

The earth is finite. Fossil fuels are not renewable. In this respect our energy base differs from that of all earlier civilizations. They could have maintained their energy supply by careful cultivation. We cannot.

Fuel that has been burned is gone forever. Fuel is even more evanescent than metals. Metals, too, are non-renewable resources threatened with ultimate extinction, but something can be salvaged from scrap. Fuel leaves no scrap and there is nothing man can do to rebuild exhausted fossil fuel reserves. They were created by solar energy 500 million years ago and took eons to grow to their present volume.

In the face of the basic fact that fossil fuel reserves are finite, the exact length of time these reserves will last is important in only one respect: the longer they last, the more time do we have, to invent ways of living off renewable or substitute energy sources and to adjust our economy to the vast changes which we can expect from such a shift. Fossil fuels resemble capital in the bank.

A prudent and responsible parent will use his capital sparingly in order to pass on to his children as much as possible of his inheritance. A selfish and irresponsible parent will squander it in riotous living and care not one whit how his offspring will fare.

(Source)

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2016 Annual General Meeting Report

Transition Brockville / 30 November 2016

Butler's Creek gardenersTransition Brockville’s well-attended Annual General Meeting on November 27 at the Brockville Public Library was lively, positive and productive.

After everyone had enjoyed a lunch of homemade soup and chili, MC Izabela Waglay summarized Transition presentations in 2016. Other members of the steering committee briefly described Transition’s partnerships with the library for Seedy Saturday, with the city’s solid waste officer for Talking Trash, with Butler’s Creek Community Garden for Tasty Tours, and with Ontario Culture Days for a Transition display on Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

Next came an open discussion on what Transition Brockville’s goals for 2017 should be. Top of the list – seek partnerships with other groups and individuals in the community that share many of Transition’s goals for building community resilience. Thanks to Karen and Bill Carriere, of Transition Cornwall+, and Alan Medcalf, former chair of the Brockville Cycling Advisory Committee, for their ideas on how to go about finding partners.

[ more… ]

Downtown recognized as a Bicycle Friendly Business Area

DBIA/Ontario by Bike / 21 November 2016

dbialogoDowntown Brockville is now one of four certified Bicycle Friendly Business Areas in Ontario! The Ontario By Bike Network is a province-wide network of certified bicycle friendly businesses and business areas that collectively enhance Ontario’s cycle tourism sector and growing cycling market. This designation positions downtown Brockville as a hub for the excellent on road cycling and trail riding throughout the city and into the surrounding region.

The Downtown Brockville Business Improvement Area (DBIA), an association of businesses operating within a specific district approved by the City of Brockville, has been working over the past months with Ontario By Bike to meet the minimum criteria for the desigination, including dedicated cycling page on the BIA’s website (www.downtownbrockville.com/cycle-downtown-brockville.php). Meg Plooy, Executive Director of the Downtown Brockville Business Improvement Area states, “With the expansion of the Brock Trail and continued improvements to active transportation infrastructure within our City and Region, DBIA was eager to take the steps to be awarded our Bike Friendly designation and continue to promote Downtown Brockville as an alive and vibrant destination.”

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

Transition Network Newsletter – November 2016

Transition Network / 03 November 2016

transicio-coverWe open this month with review of an irony free film about Climate Change by the owner of a $200m yacht, an award for a film, a new inspiring French film and two pieces on Brexit, it really isn’t time for everybody to get stoned (as might now Dylan agree). Insights into community Funders and communities having fun doing stuff. Plus reports from Italy, Mallorca, Barcelona and a course in Slovenia.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 2 of 14»

The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and works collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.