Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Industrial agriculture (29)

Beef, lamb, lobster or fish?

University of Tasmania / 04 April 2018

A new study by a team of Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and Canadian scientists has found that catching most types of fish produces far less carbon per kilo of protein than land-based alternatives such as beef or lamb.

The researchers undertaking the study found that fisheries for small pelagic species such as anchovies and sardines emit a fraction of the carbon generated by red meat production.

On average, global fisheries have a low-carbon footprint similar to that of poultry.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Peasants, not industrial agriculture, are the way to feed world

New Internationalist / Pat Mooney, Nnimmo Bassey / 14 December 2017

In our report delivered to policymakers in both Rome and Bonn, Who Will Feed Us?, ETC Group (the Action Group on Erosion, Technology and Concentration) provides original data about the importance of peasant food systems and the real economic, environmental and social cost of industrial agriculture.

The industrial food chain is using at least 75 per cent of the world’s agricultural land and most of agriculture’s fossil fuel and freshwater resources to feed barely 30 per cent of the world’s population. Conversely, more than 500 million peasant farms around the world are using less than 25 per cent of the land – and almost no fossil fuels or chemicals – to feed 70 per cent of humanity.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The approaching crisis: Is the world running out of water?

news.com.au / Nick Whigham / 17 June 2017

Water is absolutely fundamental to life, which makes the increasingly loud warnings about water scarcity and an impending global water crisis so concerning for world leaders.

If current patterns of consumption continue unabated, two-thirds of the world’s population will be facing water shortages as a daily reality by 2025 and global policy makers are scrambling to avoid catastrophe.

“What’s happening bit by bit is that water scarcity is becoming increasingly common all around the world, no matter where you look as country after country hits the limit of what it can use,” says Professor Mike Young.

“Whether that’s in Australia, California, China, India, Pakistan, or right throughout Africa.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Surviving a hostile climate on local food: Michael Brownlee

Conversation Earth / Dave Gardner / 06 June 2017

A scaled-up local food system may be the only way we can feed ourselves as we weather the storm of climate change. Until now, CSAs, urban gardens and farmer’s markets have been the face of the local food movement. But Michael Brownlee, author of The Local Food Revolution: How Humanity Will Feed Itself in Uncertain Times, tells us this is not nearly enough. In this episode, the first of a two-part conversation, Brownlee shares how global industrial agriculture is failing us, and can’t adapt to the coming climate changes. He advocates relocalizing our food supply chain in order to adapt and survive.

7 ways dropping meat from your diet can help

MarketWatch / Brian Kateman / 18 April 2017

People cut meat from their diets for many reasons — health, animal welfare, the environment, among others. There is a growing number of individuals who are reducing their intake of animal products to better themselves and the planet. According to a recent survey, 35% of Brits are eating less meat than they did a year ago. This holds true for Americans, too.

The term “reducetarian” celebrates this trend in people choosing to eat fewer animal products. It unites vegans and vegetarians (people who eat less meat, just to such a degree that they eat none at all) with everyone who eats less meat than a typical omnivore. And it replaces static and self-defeating identifiers like “lazy vegan” and “cheating vegetarian” with more positive ones. Reducetarians work to cut down their carnivorous consumption by gradually reducing their meat, egg, and dairy intakes. They play around with Meatless Monday, Vegan Before Six, and Weekday Vegetarianism to see what works best for them.

Here are 7 reasons this flexible and easy approach to eating will help you become a happier, healthier, and richer person.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Experts: ‘Myth’ that pesticides are necessary to feed the world

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 07 March 2017

The idea that pesticides are essential to feed a fast-growing global population is a myth, according to UN food and pollution experts.

A new report, being presented to the UN human rights council on Wednesday, is severely critical of the global corporations that manufacture pesticides, accusing them of the “systematic denial of harms”, “aggressive, unethical marketing tactics” and heavy lobbying of governments which has “obstructed reforms and paralysed global pesticide restrictions”.

The report says pesticides have “catastrophic impacts on the environment, human health and society as a whole”, including an estimated 200,000 deaths a year from acute poisoning. Its authors said: “It is time to create a global process to transition toward safer and healthier food and agricultural production.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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