Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Home gardens (112)

5 container gardening tips

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Poindexter / 28 April 2017

I look forward to spring every year. I start planning my small raised bed vegetable and herb garden about a month before I can actually put anything on the ground. I learned the hard way that I need to be patient lest I lose everything to an unexpected frost.

My yard is not very big so, I have always filled clay pots with brightly colored flowers to place around the outside of my home. Over the past couple of years, I have expanded my container gardening to include fruits, vegetables, and herbs, not just flowers. I have discovered that I can grow almost anything in a container. Here is what I have learned from my container gardening adventures.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Supercharge your soil for spring!

Mother Earth News / Benedict Vanheems / 28 March 2017

Now’s the ideal time to enrich your soil for the coming growing season. The best way to do that is to add organic matter to improve soil structure, increase fertility, and feed the essential microbial life that lives in the soil.

A thick layer of organic matter — for instance, compost, animal manure or leafmold — can be spread on the soil surface then forked or tilled in to the top 6-12 inches of soil.

Alternatively, spread organic matter as a 2- 3-inch thick mulch. Earthworms and other beneficial soil organisms will work the mulch into the soil for you. This is the best way to improve soil around perennial plants such as fruit trees and bushes, or around overwintering vegetable crops. Mulching with organic matter also helps to lock in soil moisture by reducing evaporation, which means less watering is needed.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Unconventional gardening methods: Pros and cons

Mother Earth News / Shelley Stonebrook / February/March 2017

Novel gardening methods go through phases of prominence on the gardening scene. Perhaps made popular by a new book or a reinvigoration of an old method, there’s always some “hot” technique, product, or way to garden. But what’s just hype, and what really works? Which gardening methods have noted advantages? And which methods make sense for small-scale backyard gardeners versus serious homesteaders or market gardeners? Let’s dig into the benefits and potential hang-ups of six gardening styles you’ve likely heard about lately.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seedy Saturday growing bigger and bigger

Recorder & Times / Jonathon Brodie / 13 March 2017

The Seedy Saturday Free Seed Exchange is finding its roots in Brockville.

The third edition of the event took place Saturday and already it has shown considerable growth, moving from its former home at the city library and into the Memorial Centre hall this year.

On top of the garden clubs that have always been involved in the event, organizers chose to listen to last year’s feedback and expand by bringing in vendors as well.

Five local vendors, ranging from honeymakers to a business that makes dog treats, set up for the event and helped fill the larger space.

The addition appears to have worked out as it was estimated a couple hundred people checked out Seedy Saturday, to give the event its highest attendance.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How to share a vegetable garden

Shareable / Janelle Orsi / 19 October 2009

Question:I would like to start a vegetable garden, but I live in an apartment and don’t have yard space. My neighbor a few blocks down has a huge front yard and she offered to let me grow vegetables there. Are there any legal or other issues we should think about?” – Dania M.

It is wonderful that you and your neighbor have joined the movement of people sharing yard space to grow food. Yard-sharing has many benefits, from access to fresh food to stronger neighborhood connections to environmental sustainability. But there are also potential pitfalls to sharing a garden, which you can avoid by discussing them early on with your neighbor.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ Hat tip to Transition Cornwall+! ]

Seedy Saturday is bigger and better than ever this year

Transition Brockville, Brockville Public Library

The Brockville Public Library and Transition Brockville will be hosting the 3rd annual Seedy Saturday free seed swap on Saturday, March 11, from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Brockville Memorial Centre, 100 Magedoma Blvd.

Seed savers and garden lovers are invited to swap and share seeds, and meet and share experiences with local gardeners. Our Seedy Saturday will also feature free planting activities for kids, as well as a seed sprouting demonstration. This year Seedy Saturday is expanding to include special guest speakers on improving your soil (Dave Alguire, 10:30) and starting your own seeds indoors (Jeremy Dutton, 11:00), as well as displays by local food and garden vendors.

Everyone is welcome to attend and pick up free seeds.

If you would like to register and bring your own labeled vegetable and flower seeds to swap, or for more information about Seedy Saturday, please contact Brandy at the library, 613-342-3936 or brandy@brockvillelibrary.ca, or Chris Stesky with Transition Brockville, cstesky@xplornet.com.

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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