Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Home gardens (140)

Cut and come again edibles

The Edible Garden / Edythe Falconer / July 2017

If we want to get the best out of our plants harvesting them a bit at a time is a good idea and doesn’t leave gaps in rows of healthy homegrown goodies. There are several plants that lend themselves readily to this procedure.

Even those of us who don’t grow rhubarb will know that this plant will keep on regenerating throughout the growing season. You in turn as the prospective cook will always have fresh stems near at hand. Top dressing around the plant once or twice per year will ensure good production over time.

There are other plants that are similarly obliging and at least two of them belong to the cabbage family. These are broccoli and broccolini. In the case of broccoli once the main stem has been harvested the plant will keep on producing smaller heads that are just as tasty as the larger first one.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

6 methods for harvesting rainwater

Mother Earth News / Kelly Coyne, Erik Knutzen / 30 April 2014

After conservation, the second step toward water independence is harvesting rainwater. The number of ways you can go about this might surprise you.

Rainwater harvesting is an easy and positive course of action for people in nearly every climate in the world. Living in a dry place such as the desert southwest may make it seem more urgent, but no matter where we live, rainwater harvesting is a positive step toward changing our attitude toward the water that falls for free from the sky. Rainwater can be sent to where nature intended it to go — to the soil.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Teaching gardening skills to schoolchildren

Transition Brockville / 17 May 2017

A local nurserywoman’s dedication to teaching schoolchildren how to make gardens and grow food and flowers will be featured at the next Transition Brockville presentation on Sunday, May 28, 2 p.m., at the Brockville Public Library.

In addition, Transition Brockville will officially launch its collection of books on sustainability, now housed in the public library.

Donna White, co-owner of Green Things nursery on County Road 2, just east of Brockville, has been running her school program, Green Heart, for the past nine years, teaching children of all ages at St. Mary High School in Brockville, St. Mark elementary and South Grenville District High School in Prescott, and a Gananoque school.

Sometimes the project is a vegetable garden, a kitchen garden, or an edible flowers garden; other times kids plant trees, shrubs and perennials. Supplies from the nursery are donated by the schools, and White volunteers her time, for example, coming one week to teach seed starting, another to teach how to transplant what the kids have grown.

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5 container gardening tips

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Poindexter / 28 April 2017

I look forward to spring every year. I start planning my small raised bed vegetable and herb garden about a month before I can actually put anything on the ground. I learned the hard way that I need to be patient lest I lose everything to an unexpected frost.

My yard is not very big so, I have always filled clay pots with brightly colored flowers to place around the outside of my home. Over the past couple of years, I have expanded my container gardening to include fruits, vegetables, and herbs, not just flowers. I have discovered that I can grow almost anything in a container. Here is what I have learned from my container gardening adventures.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Supercharge your soil for spring!

Mother Earth News / Benedict Vanheems / 28 March 2017

Now’s the ideal time to enrich your soil for the coming growing season. The best way to do that is to add organic matter to improve soil structure, increase fertility, and feed the essential microbial life that lives in the soil.

A thick layer of organic matter — for instance, compost, animal manure or leafmold — can be spread on the soil surface then forked or tilled in to the top 6-12 inches of soil.

Alternatively, spread organic matter as a 2- 3-inch thick mulch. Earthworms and other beneficial soil organisms will work the mulch into the soil for you. This is the best way to improve soil around perennial plants such as fruit trees and bushes, or around overwintering vegetable crops. Mulching with organic matter also helps to lock in soil moisture by reducing evaporation, which means less watering is needed.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Unconventional gardening methods: Pros and cons

Mother Earth News / Shelley Stonebrook / February/March 2017

Novel gardening methods go through phases of prominence on the gardening scene. Perhaps made popular by a new book or a reinvigoration of an old method, there’s always some “hot” technique, product, or way to garden. But what’s just hype, and what really works? Which gardening methods have noted advantages? And which methods make sense for small-scale backyard gardeners versus serious homesteaders or market gardeners? Let’s dig into the benefits and potential hang-ups of six gardening styles you’ve likely heard about lately.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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