Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Home gardens (130)

Think the world is ending? Grab a shovel, not a shopping cart

The Guardian / Adam Liaw / 15 March 2020

My late grandmother lived through poverty, wars and military occupation – if you had asked her how to prepare for hard times, she’d grab a spade and start digging a vegetable garden.

If things really get bad, the garden growers will be better prepared for the future than the bunker stockers.

If you planted the likes of spinach, Asian greens, snow peas or cabbages this weekend you’d be knee deep in homegrown fresh produce within a month or two, and it could last you all through winter.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seedy Saturday a growing concern

Recorder & Times / Nick Gardiner / 10 March 2020

Organizers hope for great things to grow from Seedy Saturday’s free exchange of seeds and gardening tips at the Brockville Memorial Centre.

Plant seeds and gardening advice went hand-in-hand at the annual event and the growth of youth engagement was an encouraging sign for organizers with the Brockville Public Library and Transition Brockville.

“It’s great to see how many young people are here,” said library chief executive officer Emily Farrell, who exchanged seeds with people of all ages nurturing their green thumbs as sure signs of spring – a warm sun and bright skies – ruled the day.

Farrell said she is encouraged by a continuing community interest in all elements of gardening from composting to harvesting and how it bodes for a better future.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mark your calendar: 6th Annual Seedy Saturday, March 7

Transition Brockville / 31 January 2020

The Organic Backyard

Canadian Organic Growers

A guide to applying organic farming practices to your home or community garden.

Growing organic food enables you to eat and share the most authentic form of local food possible while actively contributing to the health of our ecosystems. In this guide, we have taken the key elements of organic farming principles and practices as contained in the Canadian Organic Standards, and have made them more user-friendly for you, the gardener.

Although coined The Organic Backyard, the content is intended to reach all growers of food on a small-scale – either at home, in community gardens, across urban backyards, at schools or in parks and reclaimed urban land.

[ MORE INFO ]

Choosing the right fruit trees for your home

Mother Earth News / Mary Lou Shaw / 16 January 2017

Whether you have just moved into a new home or have lived there for decades, it’s always the right time to plant fruit trees. A small investment of time and money will reap delicious, chemical-free fruit in only two to five years. Most fruit trees cost between $30 and $40, but can contribute to a life-time of health and enjoyment. Begin now by deciding what fruit trees you will plant.

Before heading to a local nursery or perusing a catalog, do a bit of daydreaming to figure out what fruit trees you will enjoy long-term. First of all, what fruits do you relish–apples, cherries, peaches, pears, nectarines? Living where there’s frost may mean we have to forego banana and citrus trees, but we still have lots of fruit trees to choose from.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Grow cover crops for the best garden soil

Mother Earth News / Harvey Ussery / October/November 2011

Consider cover crops your most important crops, because the requirements for abundant food crops — building soil fertility, improving soil texture, suppressing weeds, and inhibiting disease and crop-damaging insects — can be best met by the abundant use of cover crops, season after season […]

The most important strategy of all is: Do it now! When I complete a food crop harvest in fall, that same day I plant an overwinter cover crop. If I harvest a spring crop such as lettuce from a bed that I won’t be planting again until fall, I sow a fast-growing interim cover crop that does well in summer heat, such as buckwheat or cowpeas. The best time to plant a cover crop is anytime a bed is not covered by a food crop or mulch.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 22

The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly newsletter for local, provincial and national news highlights along with Big Picture articles, tips on what you can do, and an area events calendar

Biodiversity of the 1000 Islands