Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Home gardens (113)

Sustainable city living on 1/10th of an acre

Happen Films / 20 October 2018

This film tells the story of one small family practicing urban sufficiency. They live on 1/10th of an acre in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. By living more simply and utilizing alternative technologies this household draws 75-80% less electricity from the grid than the Australian average (per capita). At the same time they’re exporting five times that amount in solar energy back into the grid.

Older generations can teach us about plastic-free living

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 27 September 2018

At first glance, the future looks high-tech and cutting-edge. There’s a sense that we need to move beyond single-use plastics to solutions that only science can give us. But what if we’re heading in the wrong direction? What if the most straightforward answers to our problem lie in the past?

We didn’t always have a plastic pollution problem. Before the mid-20th century, people made do without it and, presumably, as Mark Blackburn put it descriptively in an article for One Brown Planet, they were not lying “in the streets, malnourished and dehydrated, like a scene from some apocalyptic war,” for lack of plastic water bottles. They managed just fine because their lifestyle habits were different.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mulch: Multitude of benefits

Mother Earth News / Charlyn Ellis / 05 August 2015

The Willamette Valley, usually known for it’s darn near perfect summers—dry, breezy, in the eighties with cool nights—has seen two serious heat waves this summer. One came at the end of June, the second at the end of July. Both were problematic for crops, as they came right when many young transplants were settling into the fields. My own small scale fall and winter garden went in about four days before the second heat wave. How could I keep them alive in the blazing afternoon sun when their roots were not reaching deep into the soil? I mulched. First, I worked all of the residual mulch from the early potato crop into the bed. Then I nested each start in a base of straw mulch laid over the ground and soaker hoses. They all came through. Mulch. Straw, leaves, winter cover crops, cardboard or woodshavings … it’s useful stuff. Placed neatly around the base of young plants and later worked into the soil, it has a multitude of benefits.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

World Food Day celebration

Transition Cornwall+ Food Action Group / 29 August 2018

Come celebrate World Food Day at the South Stormont homestead of Bill and Karen Carriere, on Sunday, October 14, 11 am – 3 pm.

The free day is packed with activities for the whole family in this beautiful setting, focusing on sustainable food production, both locally and globally. People can take guided and self-guided tours of the property’s fruit and nut groves, winter greenhouse, young food forest as well as enjoy woodland ‘mirror’ walks. There will be demo stations on different methods of food preservation and cider pressing, hands-on harvesting of root vegetables, children’s nature and food activities, and much more. A highlight will be an illustrated talk by a specialist on world food issues from USC Canada along with displays of projects worldwide. There will also be refreshments using local ingredients (a fundraiser for the USC Canada).

[ MORE INFO ]

Tips for success in germinating seeds in hot weather

Mother Earth News / Pam Dawling / 27 July 2018

In an earlier post I wrote general themes for starting seeds in hot weather. Here are some specific tricks.

Seed Storage

Viability and vigor of seeds deteriorates when they are stored in warm places, especially if containers are not airtight, and the air is humid. If you have crops you grow in spring and again for the fall, store those seeds in a cool place over the summer.

Chilling lettuce seed can help germination in hot weather. We make a practice of putting our spinach seed in double ziplock bags and putting it in the freezer for two weeks before we attempt late summer sowings. This can trick the seed into germinating better.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Homemade fertilizer from vegetable scraps

Mother Earth News / Kathleen Cabeceiras / April/May 2016

We’re big fruit and vegetable eaters, so we have lots of rinds and peelings to dispose of. Those, along with coffee grounds, tea leaves and egg shells, really add up to a lot of potential compost.

I bought an inexpensive food blender, which I keep under the kitchen sink when not in use. Every day, I grind up all the peelings, grounds and shells with some water, and then I pour the mixture around my rhododendrons, azaleas and other shrubs. If we have any banana peels, I grind those up with some water and pour the mixture around my roses. Roses seem to love bananas! These “produce smoothies” really are good fertilizer; you should see my rhododendrons in bloom!

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

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