Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Home gardens (136)

Cheap, simple DIY water catchment and irrigation

resilience.org / Kara Stiff / 8 July 2020

Last year in foothills North Carolina, we had a hundred-year flood in June. Then we went three months without any rain at all. Some things produced well in spite of drought, but tomatoes really suffered and I hardly got any pumpkins. I was not able to keep things adequately watered by hand even before my catchment tank ran dry.

I know that the carbon footprint of tap water is pretty small compared to, say, tropical vacations. But I still have a philosophical problem with paying to have water cleaned so thoroughly that it’s drinkable, and then pumped for miles and miles, only to pour it on the ground. I like the idea of living within the rain budget of my area, which isn’t too hard because we usually get too much. I like the idea of having irrigation water even if I lost access to my local water utility for some reason (power outage, income outage, anything).

Most of all, I like the idea of my garden looking all big and lush like my mom’s. She waters constantly.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Gardens sprouting up as pandemic keeps us closer to home

CBC News / Hallie Cotnam / 16 May 2020

They’re sprouting up all over Ottawa this spring: raised gardens in the backyard and converted flower beds in the front, re-tooled to grow fresh produce close to home.

Urban gardening may be the new sourdough and seeds the new toilet paper as families seek to grow fresh food in the safe confines of their own property.

Social media feeds are full of garden boxes for sale. Giant cubes of soil squat in driveways, waiting for this weekend, or perhaps warmer weather.

Interest in the Edible Ottawa Gardens Group has exploded since the arrival of COVID-19, with membership blossoming from 3,000 to 4,600 in just two months, Valerie Sharp, one of the group’s administrators. She said most of them are new to gardening, many using the opportunity to spend more quality time outside with their families.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

UCDSB: Student gardening motion denied

Recorder & Times / Sabrina Bedford / 15 May 2020

A motion encouraging students to grow their own food while learning from home was denied at the public school board this week.

Upper Canada District School Board trustee John McCrea put forward a motion at this week’s board meeting to inspire students to get outside and plant vegetable gardens, citing a variety of benefits associated with gardening.

“There is a deep and profound feeling that people get when they’re outside,” McCrea said at the meeting.

“Growing something really makes you feel better.”

The motion explained that “gardening, be it in a container on a window sill or on a hectare of good land, is therapeutic, productive, measurable and available to all students.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

7 ways to build resilience at home

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 30 April 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has made people realize how dependent they are on the outside world for services, resources, and entertainment. Weeks of self-isolation have left many feeling vulnerable, scared, and bored. In the months and years that follow this pandemic, I suspect that more people will be wanting to build up their resilience at home. They won’t become outright preppers, who anticipate worst-case scenarios at every turn (and do have some worthwhile takeaway points for the rest of us), but they won’t want to feel so blindsided and exposed to disaster ever again.

I came across an article by Trent Hamm for The Simple Dollar blog, where he lists “12 frugal ways to become more self-sufficient.” This is exactly what I’m talking about, and I’d like to highlight a few of his points, and share some of mine. Self-sufficiency, or resilience, is always a smart goal to pursue, and it doesn’t have to be all or nothing; even a partial achievement can make a big difference. If you’re not already doing some or all of these things, you can start today.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seed sellers see business bloom as pandemic pushes demand

CBC News / Christine Maki / 20 April 2020

After three decades producing organic vegetable and flower seeds, [Greta] Kryger was hoping to retire after this year. But instead of winding things down, she’s dealing with three to four times the usual demand, all thanks to the coronavirus pandemic.

“I could close today and have enough for my whole year of living,” she said. “People say they’re scared they won’t have enough food. And because they’re home now they have nothing else to do. It’s an activity to do together with the kids.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Gardening guru explains how to regrow veggies from scraps

CBC News / Madeleine Cummings / 26 April 2020

Q: What are the easiest vegetables to regrow?

A: Green onions are pretty easy to regrow. You can also do bulb onions, of course, but there’s lettuce, like romaine lettuce, beets, carrots, parsnips, potatoes, and even to a certain extent, cabbage. I think we kind of forget that when we buy many of these plants in the grocery store, they’re still alive. They’re not dead! They’ve been harvested from a field or from maybe a greenhouse and, given the right conditions, they can start to grow again.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 23

The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly newsletter for local, provincial and national news highlights along with Big Picture articles, tips on what you can do, and an area events calendar.

Biodiversity of the 1000 Islands
Follow Us on Facebook