Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Home gardens (139)

Seedy Saturday 2021: Call for seed donations

Brockville Public Library / 5 February 2021

We need seeds! If you have seeds to share, please put them in the Library drop box on George Street by Friday, February 12. Please label the seeds with seed name and date harvested.

Once we’ve collected all the donated seeds, you can check out our listing of seeds and submit your request on the library website (www.brockvillelibrary.ca) or in person starting Monday, February 22. We will package the seeds and call you to make an appointment to pick up your seeds at the Library on Saturday, March 6, between 10:00 am and 2:00 pm. Seeds will be distributed while supplies last.

Check out our selection of growing and gardening books and e-books here. (We are closed Mondays due to Covid-19 restrictions.) Questions? Contact Brandy Smith, brandy@brockvillelibrary.ca, 613-342-3936 ext. 6432.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Bill 216, Food Literacy for Students Act

Daryl Kramp, MPP / 18 December 2020

More than half Canadians grew their own food at home this year

National Post / Laura Brehaut / 7 October 2020

The spring rush on garden centres and seed sellers wasn’t a false alarm. COVID-19 has driven Canadians to get their hands in the dirt in a major way. Just over half (51 per cent) grow at least one type of fruit or vegetable, according to a new report from Dalhousie University’s Agri-Food Analytics Lab (AAL) examining home food gardening in response to the pandemic. And of those, nearly one in five (17.4 per cent) started growing their own food for the first time during COVID-19.

“Pandemic gardening is definitely a thing,” says AAL research associate Lisa Mullins, laughing. “(Lockdown) led a lot of people to look at their physical surroundings and say, ‘OK. What can I do to add a little joy to my life — to broaden my interests?’”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Cheap, simple DIY water catchment and irrigation

resilience.org / Kara Stiff / 8 July 2020

Last year in foothills North Carolina, we had a hundred-year flood in June. Then we went three months without any rain at all. Some things produced well in spite of drought, but tomatoes really suffered and I hardly got any pumpkins. I was not able to keep things adequately watered by hand even before my catchment tank ran dry.

I know that the carbon footprint of tap water is pretty small compared to, say, tropical vacations. But I still have a philosophical problem with paying to have water cleaned so thoroughly that it’s drinkable, and then pumped for miles and miles, only to pour it on the ground. I like the idea of living within the rain budget of my area, which isn’t too hard because we usually get too much. I like the idea of having irrigation water even if I lost access to my local water utility for some reason (power outage, income outage, anything).

Most of all, I like the idea of my garden looking all big and lush like my mom’s. She waters constantly.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Gardens sprouting up as pandemic keeps us closer to home

CBC News / Hallie Cotnam / 16 May 2020

They’re sprouting up all over Ottawa this spring: raised gardens in the backyard and converted flower beds in the front, re-tooled to grow fresh produce close to home.

Urban gardening may be the new sourdough and seeds the new toilet paper as families seek to grow fresh food in the safe confines of their own property.

Social media feeds are full of garden boxes for sale. Giant cubes of soil squat in driveways, waiting for this weekend, or perhaps warmer weather.

Interest in the Edible Ottawa Gardens Group has exploded since the arrival of COVID-19, with membership blossoming from 3,000 to 4,600 in just two months, Valerie Sharp, one of the group’s administrators. She said most of them are new to gardening, many using the opportunity to spend more quality time outside with their families.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

UCDSB: Student gardening motion denied

Recorder & Times / Sabrina Bedford / 15 May 2020

A motion encouraging students to grow their own food while learning from home was denied at the public school board this week.

Upper Canada District School Board trustee John McCrea put forward a motion at this week’s board meeting to inspire students to get outside and plant vegetable gardens, citing a variety of benefits associated with gardening.

“There is a deep and profound feeling that people get when they’re outside,” McCrea said at the meeting.

“Growing something really makes you feel better.”

The motion explained that “gardening, be it in a container on a window sill or on a hectare of good land, is therapeutic, productive, measurable and available to all students.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
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