Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Global warming (498)

Methane gas delay a ‘real blow’ to Canada’s targets

The Star / Alex Ballingall / 21 April 2017

The Liberal government’s decision to delay its new methane gas regulations by three years is being attacked by environmental activists as a blow to Canada’s climate commitments and a possible capitulation to the oil industry.

Dale Marshall, national program manager with Environmental Defence, told the Star that curbing methane gas is one of the easiest ways to reduce emissions that cause climate change. The fact that the government is putting off action on this low-hanging fruit in the climate fight demonstrates a “total” lack of leadership, Marshall said.

“This is really discouraging, because this is the easy stuff. It’s the only thing that’s targeting the oil and gas industry, and they’re backing off on it,” he said, arguing that the move suggests Ottawa was swayed by industry stakeholders to put off the regulations.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

To the Ends of the Earth

TVO / 23 January 2017

Narrated by Emma Thompson, this documentary examines the rise of extreme energy extraction in Canada and its impact on the environment, economy and local communities. The fossil fuel industry’s intensive hunt for unconventional non-renewables, including Arctic drilling and shale gas fracking, also gives rise to a formidable array of scientists, authors and activists who envision a post-growth economic future premised on co-operation, social justice and ecological stewardship.

Experiencing ‘eco-anxiety’?

CBC The Current / 06 April 2017

“Eco-anxiety” has become a short-hand description for symptoms that psychologists are starting to see from Nunavut to Australia and beyond.

That feeling of distress is detailed in a new report by the American Psychological Association that suggests worrying about climate change is having a serious impact on our mental health, and it’s something they say we need to pay a lot more attention to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

New study links carbon pollution to extreme weather

The Guardian / John Abraham / 07 April 2017

It was only a few weeks ago that I wrote about changes to extreme weather in a warming world. That prior article dealt with the increase of extreme precipitation events as the Earth warms. I termed the relationship a thermodynamic one; it was driven by local thermodynamic processes. But extreme weather can also occur because of large-scale changes to the atmosphere and oceans. This issue is the topic of another just-published paper that makes a convincing case for a whole new type of influence of humans on extreme weather. In a certain sense, this study confirms what was previously reported here and here. With the march of science, the tools, methods, and evidence get better each year.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ TB: This emerging discussion was mentioned by TB in its presentation to the Brockville & District Chamber of Commerce at its Green Summit back in 2013. ]

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

NASA Global Climate Change / Maria-José Viñas / 22 March 2017

Arctic sea ice appears to have reached on March 7 a record low wintertime maximum extent, according to scientists at NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado. And on the opposite side of the planet, on March 3 sea ice around Antarctica hit its lowest extent ever recorded by satellites at the end of summer in the Southern Hemisphere, a surprising turn of events after decades of moderate sea ice expansion.

On Feb. 13, the combined Arctic and Antarctic sea ice numbers were at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979. Total polar sea ice covered 6.26 million square miles (16.21 million square kilometers), which is 790,000 square miles (2 million square kilometers) less than the average global minimum extent for 1981-2010 – the equivalent of having lost a chunk of sea ice larger than Mexico.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mental health harmed by global warming

International Business Times / Juliana Rose Pignataro / 30 March 2017

A report released Wednesday by the American Psychological Association, Climate for Health and ecoAmerica detailed how climate change and associated extreme weather events can cause trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and an abundance of other mental health problems.

“The tolls on our mental health are far reaching,” the report stated. “They induce stress, depression and anxiety; strain social and community relationships; and have been linked to increases in aggression, violence and crime.”

Extreme weather events like droughts and floods can cause feelings of hopelessness and helplessness or intense feelings of loss, as does the loss of valuable personal items in such situations, the report noted. Hurricane Katrina was a prime example of how climate can impact mental health. Among people living in areas affected by the storm, suicidal ideation more than doubled, one in six people met the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder and almost half of people developed a mood disorder.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

 

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