Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Global warming (384)

March 2018 was one of six warmest Marches on record

NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies / 16 April 2018

March 2018 was +0.89 °C warmer than the average March of the 1951-1980 period. This value is lower than the two hottest years of the record — March 2016 (+1.30 °C) and March 2017 (+1.12 °C) — and is comparable with the years 2002, 2010, and 2015, which cluster tightly around +0.9 °C. The corresponding number for all other years in our 138 years of modern record-keeping is at or below +0.77 °C.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Film teaser: Once You Know

Emmanuel Cappellin / 2017

"ONCE YOU KNOW", A DOCUMENTARY FILM BY EMMANUEL CAPPELLIN (teaser) from Emmanuel Cappellin on Vimeo.

Hillman on the climate reality no one else will dare mention

The Guardian / Patrick Barkham / 26 April 2018

[86-year-old social scientist Mayer] Hillman accuses all kinds of leaders – from religious leaders to scientists to politicians – of failing to honestly discuss what we must do to move to zero-carbon emissions. “I don’t think they can because society isn’t organised to enable them to do so. Political parties’ focus is on jobs and GDP, depending on the burning of fossil fuels.”

Without hope, goes the truism, we will give up. And yet optimism about the future is wishful thinking, says Hillman. He believes that accepting that our civilisation is doomed could make humanity rather like an individual who recognises he is terminally ill. Such people rarely go on a disastrous binge; instead, they do all they can to prolong their lives.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

A Call to Life: Preview

Climate Action/Music and the Spoken Word / 17 March 2018

Concert pianist Rachelle McCabe and creative writer Kathleen Dean Moore inspire audiences to defend the wild, reeling world in a performance that weaves powerful spoken words into Rachmaninoff’s “Variations on a Theme of Corelli.”

[ ARTIST WEBSITE ]

The id and the eco

AEON / Rosemary Randall / 05 December 2012

When I was young, I was told that there were a number of topics I shouldn’t talk about at dinner parties: politics, religion, sex, money and death usually featured on the list. Today we might add climate change. Like politics or religion, the subject can lead to conflict or controversy. Like sex or money, it can cause embarrassment. Most importantly, like death, it can raise fears and anxieties that people feel have no place in polite conversation.

Climate change is a disturbing subject that casts a shadow across ordinary life. I recall an encounter with a woman called Sandra at a community project I was running. As we completed a questionnaire to calculate her individual carbon footprint, she pushed her coffee cup awkwardly away and said: ‘I hate all that advice about “Don’t overfill the kettle, turn your thermostat down, unplug your phone charger.” I try to follow it but, every time I do one of those things, it makes me think about climate change and I feel hopeless, upset. So then I don’t bother. Why make yourself feel bad when there isn’t really anything you can do?’ Sandra expressed openly what most people don’t admit — thinking about climate change is upsetting and brings to the surface an internal conflict about how to respond.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The oceans’ circulation hasn’t been this sluggish in 1,000 years

Washington Post / Chris Mooney / 11 April 2018

The Atlantic Ocean circulation that carries warmth into the Northern Hemisphere’s high latitudes is slowing down because of climate change, a team of scientists asserted Wednesday, suggesting one of the most feared consequences is already coming to pass.

The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation has declined in strength by 15 percent since the mid-20th century to a “new record low,” the scientists conclude in a peer-reviewed study published in the journal Nature. That’s a decrease of 3 million cubic meters of water per second, the equivalent of nearly 15 Amazon rivers.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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