Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Global warming (356)

Energy, money and technology – from the lens of the superorganism

KAUST Official / Streamed live on 23 January 2018

In his #WEP2018 keynote, Nate Hagens discusses how all of our lives will be influenced by how we react to the coming era of harder to extract and more costly fossil fuels that will be combined with cleaner but more stochastic energy types.

Special thanks to our Platinum #WEP2018 sponsors: Saudi Aramco and Sabic.

OFA: Focus on adapting to climate change

Simcoe Reformer / Michael-Allan Marion / 28 January 2018

“The OFA is pleased to see a renewed focus by government on the need for adaptation to the potential impacts of climate change,” president Keith Currie said last week in a presentation to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, which is posted on the ministry’s Environmental Bill of Rights website.

“The agricultural sector has a long history of learning and adapting to the variability of Canadian weather and climate. Global warming and climate change, however, present a much more formidable challenge to agricultural production with an observable increase in the frequency of extreme weather events and changes to regional water cycles.

“The uncertainty and variability resulting from climate change presents significant increase risk to food production and rural livelihoods.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Oceans hit hottest temperatures ever recorded … by far

Common Dreams / Jessica Corbett / 26 January 2018

A new analysis conducted by Chinese researchers and published in a peer-reviewed journal on Friday found that 2017 was the hottest year on record for the world’s oceans, renewing concerns among those in the scientific community about the man-made climate crisis.

“The long-term warming trend driven by human activities continued unabated,” the researchers, Lijing Cheng and Jiang Zhu, wrote in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. “The high ocean temperatures in recent years have occurred as greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere have also risen, reaching record highs in 2017.”

While measuring atmospheric temperature changes provides insight into humankind’s impact on the planet—and recent reports show 2017 was the second-hottest year on record—”in terms of understanding how fast the Earth is warming, the key is the oceans,” because almost all the planet’s heat is stored in the seas, as John Abraham, a professor of thermal sciences, explains in a piece for the Guardian.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The Global Risks Report 2018

World Economic Forum / January 2018

Humanity has become remarkably adept at understanding how to mitigate conventional risks that can be relatively easily isolated and managed with standard risk-management approaches. But we are much less competent when it comes to dealing with complex risks in the interconnected systems that underpin our world, such as organizations, economies, societies and the environment. There are signs of strain in many of these systems: our accelerating pace of change is testing the absorptive capacities of institutions, communities and individuals. When risk cascades through a complex system, the danger is not of incremental damage but of “runaway collapse” or an abrupt transition to a new, suboptimal status quo.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

We want to fight climate change – as cheaply as possible

iPolitics / Rachel Gilmore / 11 January 2018

Most Canadians care about the climate – but not quite enough to welcome massive energy bill hikes or to buy an electric car.

That was one of the many interesting snippets to come out of a recently-released report for Natural Resources Canada. The report’s purpose was to help tailor the government’s resource-related plans to meet “the needs of the public.”

Here’s the highlight reel.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2017: Hottest year with no el Niño

Open Mind / Tamino / 11 January 2018

Last year (2017) will not be the hottest year on record; it’s likely to be 2nd-hottest. But it will be the hottest which was not enhanced by el Niño conditions.

El Niño is the “warm phase” of a natural oscillation of wind patterns over the Pacific ocean, which increases the amount of heat transferred from ocean to atmosphere. When that happens, there’s more heat in the atmosphere so surface temperatures increase (actually, temperature of the air near the surface, which is what matters for land-based living things). When El Niño subsides, the warming subsides too. The opposite face of the coin is la Niña, when heat tends to go from atmosphere to ocean and surface temperatures tend to be cooler. Together, they make up the el Niño southern oscillation (ENSO).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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