Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Global warming (397)

Beyond Crisis – a hopeful film about meeting the challenge

Transition Brockville / 18 September 2018

If you know climate change is a challenge that must be faced, but you don’t know how to talk about it with your family and friends, Beyond Crisis is a film that aims to help you find a way.

Transition Brockville’s next presentation is a free public screening of Beyond Crisis, Sunday, September 23, at 2 p.m. in the Brockville Public Library. Following the film, Lynn Ovenden, of the Citizens’ Climate Lobby, will facilitate a discussion.

“It’s my hope that people will leave our meeting feeling encouraged and a lot more energized” to talk to others about acting on climate change, says Ovenden. A new grandmother, retired government biologist, and longtime field biologist, Ovenden lives near Casselman, Ontario. Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) is a non-partisan grassroots advocacy organization focused on national policies to address climate change. Ovenden signed up with CCL Canada (NCR Chapter) in 2016 to help build the political will for effective climate action.

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Ford has decided to consult Ontario about climate change

National Observer / Steph Wechsler / 12 September 2018

Premier Doug Ford’s government has decided to consult Ontarians about its climate change policies, one day after it was taken to court for “unlawfully” scrapping action to reduce carbon pollution.

The government’s Environment Ministry opened an online portal to seek public feedback about what it should do about climate change, pledging to use the information collected in order to introduce a new plan. Ontario is Canada most populous province and makes up a key component of the country’s national efforts to meet its international climate change goals.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How should we face the challenge of climate change?

Al Jazeera News / 14 September 2018

Much of the world’s attention this week has been focused on two powerful storms: Hurricane Florence in the United States and Super Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines.

The signs of climate change are everywhere, and what were once rare forces of nature are becoming almost regular events.

The Atlantic hurricane season lasts longer, and the storms are more powerful than they were a generation ago.

Across the continent, wildfires in California have burned one million acres (404,685 hectares) of land this year. Experts say the US wildfire season is 87 days longer than it was 30 years ago.

Europe has just come through a summer of record heat that saw wildfires break out above the Arctic circle.

Record rainfall in Japan triggered landslides that smashed homes and forced evacuations. That was followed by two weeks of severe heat.

But what can we do to tackle climate change?

Spike in temperature of the Great Lakes has scientists worried

CBC News / Conrad Collaco / 11 September 2018

The Great Lakes are getting hotter, seeing a rise in some parts of three degrees.

Aaron Fisk, a professor with the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research at the University of Windsor, spoke with the CBC’s Julianne Hazlewood about why temperatures are on the rise and what that means for the Great Lakes and the things that live in it. You can read an abridged and edited version of the interview or listen to the full audio interview […]

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Summer of fire, heat and flood puts a focus on adaptation

Globe and Mail / Shawn McCarthy / 07 September 2018

The deluge flooded downtown streets and basements of high-rise office towers, causing more than $80-million in damage and nearly drowning two men who were trapped in an elevator with the rising water.

The Aug. 7 downpour in Toronto dropped 72 millimetres of rain in the city centre in a few hours, the kind of storm that is expected only once every 100 years, according to Environment Canada. Bay Street towers, including TD Centre, took on storm water and lost power; service was disrupted at Toronto’s commuter hub, Union Station; and ground-floor meeting rooms were under water at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

The $80-million is for insured damages, the Insurance Bureau of Canada said on Friday. Uninsured costs were likely higher, while severe weather across the province has caused more than $1-billion in insured property damage, the bureau said.

It was a summer of fire, heat and flood in Canada.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Hot enough for you?

David Suzuki Foundation / David Suzuki, Ian Hanington / 22 August 2018

If you follow climate news (and you should), you’ve likely heard of the global warming “hiatus.” In attempts to keep the world hooked on diminishing reserves of polluting fossil fuels, climate science deniers seized on that phenomenon to claim the warming they once argued didn’t exist stopped. Others took up the false claim out of ignorance and fear.

Global warming didn’t stop. Quite the opposite: it accelerated. According to all legitimate scientific agencies that study climate, the past four years have been the warmest on record, and 2017 was the 41st consecutive year with global average temperatures higher than in the 20th century.

This year is also shaping up to be a record-breaker. But as the old saying goes, “You ain’t seen nothing yet!” That’s because warming didn’t stop. The rate slowed slightly. And that’s over now.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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