Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Global warming (356)

Old age and societal decline

Museletter / Richard Heinberg / February 2018

People grow old and die. Civilizations eventually fail. For centuries amateur philosophers have used the former as a metaphor for the latter, leading to a few useful insights and just as many misleading generalizations. The comparison becomes more immediately interesting as our own civilization stumbles blindly toward collapse. While not the cheeriest of subjects, it’s worth exploring.

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As climate changes, we need the arts more than ever

Ensia / Richard Heinberg / 01 February 2018

As we move closer to what surely will be unprecedented ecological, economic and social disruption, meaningful art can and must express the turmoil we encounter and help us process it intellectually and emotionally.

In this sense, our need for truly great artists has never been keener.

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It’s misleading to ask what Earth’s ideal temperature is

Mashable / Andrew Freeman / 14 February 2018

Earth’s average global temperature from 2013 to 2017, as compared to a baseline average from 1951 to 1980
Climate scientists say that it’s not so much the exact global average surface temperature in 2100 that makes the most difference for whether certain species will survive global warming or if Miami will be inundated by rising seas. Instead, the rate of change is what is so important.

The faster that climate changes, the more significant the impacts will be. Just this week, for example, a study was published showing that due to the melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, sea level rise is now accelerating, making adapting to new water levels far more difficult.

“Human civilization developed during a period of remarkable climate stability,” said Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York.

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Climate modeling is more powerful than ever before

MIT Technology Review / James Temple / 08 February 2018

Just a few years ago, the conventional wisdom held that you couldn’t attribute any single extreme weather event to climate change. But now scientists increasingly can and do state the odds that human actions caused or exacerbated specific droughts and hurricanes.

One big reason for the change is that the science of climate modeling is becoming increasingly powerful as improvements in technology, techniques, and data sharing allow researchers to set up novel experiments or simply run many more of them.

Climate models are sophisticated computer simulations that approximate how the planet responds to various forces, like surges in carbon dioxide. They break down the oceans, surface, and atmosphere into 3-D boxes and calculate how shifting conditions track across time and space.

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Earth’s ice is melting much faster than forecast

Garn Press / Jason E Box / 05 February 2018

While individual climate models come close to observations on this or that piece of the complex big picture, what ends up in global assessment reports intended to help guide policy decisions and national discussions of climate change are very conservative averages of dozens of models that don’t include the latest, higher sensitivity physics.

So, alas, when it comes to ice, how fast it can go and how fast the sea will rise, if I were a betting man, I’d put my money on it going faster than forecast.

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Funding addresses Mohawks’ weather concerns

Kingston Whig / Tim Meeks / 01 February 2018

Climate change is causing much concern for the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte.

A major drought in 2016, followed by severe flooding in 2017, resulted in myriad of issues in Tyendinaga, so recently announced funding in excess of $300,000 from the federal government is welcome news for Chief R. Donald Maracle.

“We are extremely appreciative of this funding from the federal government to help us plan to deal with these issues in the future,” Maracle said.

The First Nation Adapt Program is providing funding for a community climate change impact study and a water source protection plan to First Nation communities located below the 60th parallel to assess and respond to climate change impacts on community infrastructure and emergency management. Under this program, the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte will receive $199,183 over two years.

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
TB Projects

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