Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Frugal living (115)

7 fast growing shade trees to slash your electric bill

Treehugger / Derek Markham / 02 April 2014

The free solar energy that hits the Earth each day can keep us warm, light our homes, grow our food, and generate clean renewable electricity, so we often invite it into our lives, but when the weather heats up in the summer, the sun can actually cause us to use more energy, because we then need to run air conditioners to cool us back down.

Keeping the sun off of our homes and windows during the summer can end up saving us both money and energy, because we can avoid some of the heating effects and keep our homes cooler to begin with, so less energy is required to keep them comfortable. And one of the best ways to do that is by planting shade trees in the right location around our home, where they can block the sun from streaming in our windows and heating our walls and roofs during certain times of the day.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Workshop on Food Foraging

Transition Brockville, Brockville Public Library / 19 June 2018

Did you know you can sauté young day lily shoots in butter for a delicate addition to a meal in spring? Or that the berries of the sumac make a lovely lemonade in the heat of summer?

Parts of many plants in our flower gardens and in the wild are edible. Transition Brockville’s next presentation is a workshop on food foraging, Sunday, June 24, at 2 p.m. in the Brockville Public Library.

We’ll talk about the almost-lost art of finding food in unexpected places, as well as things to keep in mind when foraging. We’ll have actual plants people can eat, photos of other plants, links to sites for more information – even a recipe or two.

If you have experience in foraging for certain foods, your stories will be a welcome addition to the workshop. Try to bring a photo, or the actual plant, and tell what it is, where it can be found, when its edible part is ready, and how it can be used.

We’ll take notes and then post the information from the workshop on the Transition Brockville website.

All with an interest in food foraging are welcome at this free public presentation. Refreshments will be served; donations are appreciated.

Wild Edibles – Season 1 – Episode 1

The Outsider / 14 February 2014

This season covers almost 20 Common Wild Edibles: How to identify them, Where to find them, and How to eat them! Yum!

12 ways to stop wasting money and take control of your stuff

TIME / Kit Yarrow / 20 November 214

In my work as a consumer psychologist and author, I’ve read countless studies about consumer behavior, and I’ve conducted plenty of research on my own, interviewing hundreds of shoppers about how, when, and why they shop.

Here’s what I’ve learned about how to avoid piling up too much stuff and how to stop making unnecessary, excessive, and ultimately unsatisfying purchases.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Save money by drying fruits and vegetables at home

Mother Earth News / Lorna Peterson / July/August 1977

Dehydration as a method of food preservation has been around a long time. Primitive man dried victuals by the heat of the sun or with the aid of fire, then ground the dehydrated stores into a long-lasting powder or ate them “as is”. Now, thousands of years later, dehydration is still one of the most widely used methods of food preservation in the world . . . for some mighty good reasons.

  1. Drying preserves the vitamin, mineral, protein, and fiber content of foods . . . more so than preservation techniques that expose the viands to great changes in temperature.
  2. Dehydrated foodstuffs are actually more flavorful — in most cases — than the original, undried food. (Frozen and canned edibles, on the other hand, are — if anything — less tasty than their fresh or dried equivalents.)
  3. It costs little or nothing to dry foods, whereas freezing and canning both require a potentially large initial investment in equipment.
  4. Dried goods can be stored in a smaller space than either frozen, canned, or fresh foods. (Twenty pounds of tomatoes, for instance, will — when canned — fill eleven one-quart jars. The same quantity of tomatoes dried weighs a little more than a pound and occupies a single No. 10 can.)
  5. Dried foods — when kept dry — remain edible virtually forever.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Homemade fertilizer from vegetable scraps

Mother Earth News / Kathleen Cabeceiras / April/May 2016

We’re big fruit and vegetable eaters, so we have lots of rinds and peelings to dispose of. Those, along with coffee grounds, tea leaves and egg shells, really add up to a lot of potential compost.

I bought an inexpensive food blender, which I keep under the kitchen sink when not in use. Every day, I grind up all the peelings, grounds and shells with some water, and then I pour the mixture around my rhododendrons, azaleas and other shrubs. If we have any banana peels, I grind those up with some water and pour the mixture around my roses. Roses seem to love bananas! These “produce smoothies” really are good fertilizer; you should see my rhododendrons in bloom!

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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