Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Frugal living (105)

Rethinking refrigeration: The benefits of a smaller fridge

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Tuohy / 28 November 2017

If you’re a family of four or more — or you have teenagers in the house — a big French door refrigerator can be a lifesaver. But there’s room to simplify in even the most bustling households. And for smaller families, empty nesters, singletons, and retirees, opting for a smaller fridge can almost go unnoticed. These “alternative” fridges use less energy, take up less space, and encourage you to waste less food. They’re also a much better fit for small kitchens and can help you add counter space.

Here are the reasons to consider an alternative to a big refrigerator.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Home Food Preservation Headquarters

Mother Earth News

Stretching the shelf life of food can be as low-tech and hands-off (set trays in the sun to dry) or as elaborate and large-scale (a day devoted to pressure-canning summer’s bounty) as you’d like. No matter where you fall on that spectrum or whether you have surplus fruit from an ample orchard or a profusion of basil from a petite, potted herb garden, the information you need to safely and deliciously put by fresh food awaits here in our online Home Food Preservation Headquarters.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Cast iron cooking workshop

Brockville Museum / 31 August 2017

Join us for our first hands-on workshop as we discover the history and utility of cast iron pans.

  • Learn how to clean and season cast iron pans
  • Bake (and eat) some delicious food prepared in cast iron pans
  • Find out Brockville’s link to cast iron through items in our collection

This is the first in our Heritage Skills Workshop Series. Cost includes all supplies. $15 per session or $36 for the series of 3. Advance registration is required so we can gather supplies. Sign up at the museum in person (Monday-Friday, 10:00 – 5:00) or by phone (613-342-4397)

For more information email us at museum@brockville.com

Freezing vegetables: 2 great methods

Mother Earth News / Janet Chadwick
/ 20 September 2013

Freezing maintains the natural color, fresh flavor, and high nutritive value of fresh foods. The objective is to bring foods to the frozen state quickly. When properly done, fruits and vegetables are more like fresh than when preserved by any other method. Best of all, freezing vegetables and fruit is fast and easy.

I had been freezing garden vegetables for years when I began experimenting with the process. I discovered that the old standard method of washing and preparing the vegetables, then blanching, cooling, drying, packing, and freezing them was not always the fastest, easiest way to produce the best finished product. Many vegetables can be frozen without blanching (although their shelf lives in the freezer will be shorter), and greens can be stir-fried instead of blanched for a better product.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

8 huge benefits of living in a Tiny House

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Poindexter / 02 February 2017

Tiny houses are everywhere! These tiny, compact, affordable houses are the perfect addition to any family. Just look up Tiny House Hunters, Tiny House Builders, or Tiny House Nation. The blogs and TV shows show how popular the craze is right now, especially with the cost of owning a “normal house” growing out of proportion. But, besides the cost effectiveness of owning and living in a tiny house, there are tons of benefits. Ability to travel, eco-friendly living, less money decorating and cleaning, to just name a few. Together, we will go over the top 10 benefits of living in a tiny house, and hey, you might even want to start considering one.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How to keep cool without air conditioning

Mother Earth News / Stan Cox / August/September 2015

At current usage rates, air conditioning U.S. homes, businesses, schools and vehicles releases fossil carbon and fluorocarbon refrigerants that have a total annual global-warming impact equivalent to a half-billion tons of carbon dioxide. Eliminating these emissions from air conditioning would benefit the atmosphere as much as shutting down 140 typical coal-fired power plants would.

Air conditioning also eats a sizable chunk of our budgets. In the United States, I estimate that our collective annual electric bill for cooling our homes is about $30 billion. The yearly cost per household ranges from about $200 in the Northeast to more than $450 in the sweltering South.

So, how do we wean ourselves off of this energy-intensive habit? The range of natural ways to cool your home depends on where you live: in the North or South, on a forested hillside or in an urban heat island, in an apartment or a house. But whatever your situation, you can find natural cooling methods to stay comfortable without air conditioning — starting by adjusting your internal dial.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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