Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Food storage (32)

Planting with preserving in mind

Mother Earth News / Mary Moss-Sprague / 28 February 2013

In order to have enough stores to last through the next winter, one must know the quantity of product that will be needed.

The possibilities are mouth-watering and tempting. Tomatoes, apples, string beans, carrots, peas, okra, parsnips, rutabagas, turnips, berries, pears, cherries, apricots, peaches, plums, pickling cucumbers, grapes, greens, beets, garlic, onions, potatoes, asparagus, peppers, herbs, squash, and other items all lend themselves well to canning, drying or freezing. Some methods work better for certain items than others. In this instance, we will focus on vegetables designated for canning, and the quantities to plan on growing for “putting up the harvest.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Dehydrate potatoes for various uses

Mother Earth News / Susan Gregersen / 21 July 2015

When I set out to dehydrate potatoes, I think of potential meals I might use them for. If I plan to make a lot of scalloped potatoes, I slice them. For stews, soups or casseroles, I cut them into cubes which can later be rehydrated and mixed with vegetables, meat and spices. Hash browns are popular for breakfast around here, so sometimes I shred potatoes for dehydration. (I once even learned how to make my own instant mashed potato granules by accident when I over-cooked them before dehydrating.)

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Food Storage Directory

SaveTheFood.com

food-storage-directoryThis directory is filled with specific info about your favorite foods. You’ll learn how to store them, freeze them, and keep them at their best longer. You’ll also find helpful tips about safety and ways to revive food. As you read, please keep a few things in mind. First up, the time frames are only estimates (If you can’t use a food in that time frame, you can probably freeze it). Second, the best way to store food depends on how quickly you’ll use it. Finally, always trust your judgment. Knowing how long food lasts is an imperfect science, though we’ve pulled information from the best resources. Of course, buying less food more frequently is the best way to keep your food fresh and nutritious.

[ DIRECTORY ]  [ Hat tip to Transition Cornwall+ ]

Fresh produce storage tips

Mother Earth News / Anna Twitto / 06 October 2016

peppers1Fresh produce is one of the cornerstones of healthy diet, and each season brings its own cornucopia of fruit and vegetables into supermarket aisles, farmers’ markets and, of course, backyard gardens. But how do you make the best of your garden harvest (or even supermarket harvest) to extend its shelf life?

There are many methods of food preservation such as canning, drying and pickling, but in this post I’m going to talk specifically about fresh produce – that is, vegetables stored for a limited time period in their natural state.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Fall apple madness: Harvesting and processing fall apples

Mother Earth News / Charlyn Ellis / 09 September 2016

apples-useFruit trees are an excellent addition to any homestead, even a small urban lot. We have several: a ‘Macintosh’ apple, an early summer plum, a huge and ancient fig, a new persimmon, and a yellow plum that is too big to harvest. There are also two hazelnut trees on the back lot line. They provide shade in summer, leaf mulch in winter, bee forage in spring — and fruit in the fall.

Dealing with the fruit, especially the apple, which is the largest tree, can be a challenge. We eat it fresh, give it away to friends — who also have fruit trees! — make pies and cakes, and then work to preserve the harvest for the winter.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Tips for buying kitchen staples in bulk

Mother Earth News / Eric Reuter / 14 July 2016

bulk food useBuying certain foods in bulk is a great way to save money, packaging, and shopping time, while opening up new opportunities to support good farmers. We raise much of our own food on our homestead farm, but still need to source kitchen staples like flour, sugar, salt, dried pasta, and nuts from the outside world.

Buying these items in bulk has allowed us to virtually eliminate normal shopping trips, reduce packaging waste, and ensure that more of our food dollars to go farmers instead of middlemen. While the bulk bins at many grocery stores are a good start, in this context we’re talking about direct-ordering large quantities of single items rather than choosing a few pounds from a store bin.

Here are some tips and considerations for buying and handling bulk foods in a homestead setting.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
TB Projects

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