Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Food security (111)

Peasants, not industrial agriculture, are the way to feed world

New Internationalist / Pat Mooney, Nnimmo Bassey / 14 December 2017

In our report delivered to policymakers in both Rome and Bonn, Who Will Feed Us?, ETC Group (the Action Group on Erosion, Technology and Concentration) provides original data about the importance of peasant food systems and the real economic, environmental and social cost of industrial agriculture.

The industrial food chain is using at least 75 per cent of the world’s agricultural land and most of agriculture’s fossil fuel and freshwater resources to feed barely 30 per cent of the world’s population. Conversely, more than 500 million peasant farms around the world are using less than 25 per cent of the land – and almost no fossil fuels or chemicals – to feed 70 per cent of humanity.


Master gardener tip of the month

MGOC Trowel Talk / November 2017

My veggie garden hasn’t been tilled for four years and the soil is very rich and healthy. When I started gardening, I was taught that rototilling or double-digging a garden was the way to get organic matter mixed in and to ensure light, friable soil. Today’s science tells us that turning over the soil is actually bad for it. The mycorrhizal fungi and micro-organisms that make the nutrients and trace elements available to the plants are in that top layer of soil. If we constantly work the soil, we are disturbing those organisms – in effect, we are burying them and cutting off their air supply. New ones will colonize but instead of having a continuous, dynamic, healthy soil, you are constantly starting over.


How climate change is already costing you money

TVO / Patrick Metzger / 01 November 2017

It’s been understood for decades that greenhouse gases, produced largely by humanity’s infatuation with fossil fuels, are heating up the planet. However, in spite of 2017’s startling tally of hurricanes, wildfires, and other weather disasters, there remains a widespread misperception — exacerbated by poor media coverage of the climate change connection — that we’re facing a relatively minor problem that won’t hit hard for years, if ever.

This idea is wrong for all kinds of reasons, some of them profoundly alarming. However, even for those so far insulated from the worst of climate-related catastrophe, climate change is already hitting us where it counts — our wallet.


Bringing local food into the sharing economy

Cornwall Standard-Freeholder / Todd Hambleton / 19 October 2017

There’s a food revolution going on, and several dozen guests at a first-time seminar on Thursday were finding out ways to get more deeply involved in it.

The Sprouting New Connections: Scaling Up event was hosted by All Things Food/Bouffe 360, in partnership with several organizations.

Talking about the sharing economy and the role technology is playing in it, keynote speaker Marcia Woods, CEO and co-founder of Barrie-based Fresh Spoke, told the gathering “it’s bloody well time we take advantage of this opportunity and apply it to local food.”

Fresh Spoke, which has an Eastern Ontario regional ambassador, says it’s reinventing the supply chain and giving local producers a new way to get food orders where they need to go, providing a marketplace platform that connects people with local producers and simplifies the order, payment and delivery process for buyers and sellers.


Home Food Preservation Headquarters

Mother Earth News

Stretching the shelf life of food can be as low-tech and hands-off (set trays in the sun to dry) or as elaborate and large-scale (a day devoted to pressure-canning summer’s bounty) as you’d like. No matter where you fall on that spectrum or whether you have surplus fruit from an ample orchard or a profusion of basil from a petite, potted herb garden, the information you need to safely and deliciously put by fresh food awaits here in our online Home Food Preservation Headquarters.


The great nutrient collapse

Politico / Geoff Johnson / 13 September 2017

“A higher concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere would aid photosynthesis, which in turn contributes to increased plant growth,” the Texas Republican wrote. “This correlates to a greater volume of food production and better quality food.”

But as the zooplankton experiment showed, greater volume and better quality might not go hand-in-hand. In fact, they might be inversely linked. As best scientists can tell, this is what happens: Rising CO2 revs up photosynthesis, the process that helps plants transform sunlight to food. This makes plants grow, but it also leads them to pack in more carbohydrates like glucose at the expense of other nutrients that we depend on, like protein, iron and zinc.


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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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