Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Food security (108)

OFA: Focus on adapting to climate change

Simcoe Reformer / Michael-Allan Marion / 28 January 2018

“The OFA is pleased to see a renewed focus by government on the need for adaptation to the potential impacts of climate change,” president Keith Currie said last week in a presentation to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, which is posted on the ministry’s Environmental Bill of Rights website.

“The agricultural sector has a long history of learning and adapting to the variability of Canadian weather and climate. Global warming and climate change, however, present a much more formidable challenge to agricultural production with an observable increase in the frequency of extreme weather events and changes to regional water cycles.

“The uncertainty and variability resulting from climate change presents significant increase risk to food production and rural livelihoods.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Off-grid food preservation methods

Mother Earth News / Leda Meredith / June/July 2016

Before widespread refrigeration and electricity, people developed other food-preservation methods to slow down spoilage. Adopting some of these long-established ways to preserve food and relying less on modern ones will reduce your carbon footprint; increase your self-reliance; and cost less than canning, freezing, and other grid-dependent ways to preserve food.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seed viability: Waste not, want not

The Edible Garden / Dale Odorizzi / January 2018

This is an exciting time in a gardener’s life. The hustle and bustle of Christmas has passed. I can finally sit down and leisurely leaf through the seed catalogues that have arrived in my mail box over the past month. It is the time when my garden looks its best, at least in my mind. I dream about the beautiful new flowers I can grow or how neat and weed free my vegetable garden will look. As I look through my seed catalogues, I am struck with the thought that last year I bought a pack of cucumber seeds and of the 100 seeds in the pack, I only used 12. I still have over half a pack of bean and pea seeds left.

Can I use them? Should I run the risk of using seeds that may not produce, or should I just order a bunch more. There are various simple tests for viability.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Peasants, not industrial agriculture, are the way to feed world

New Internationalist / Pat Mooney, Nnimmo Bassey / 14 December 2017

In our report delivered to policymakers in both Rome and Bonn, Who Will Feed Us?, ETC Group (the Action Group on Erosion, Technology and Concentration) provides original data about the importance of peasant food systems and the real economic, environmental and social cost of industrial agriculture.

The industrial food chain is using at least 75 per cent of the world’s agricultural land and most of agriculture’s fossil fuel and freshwater resources to feed barely 30 per cent of the world’s population. Conversely, more than 500 million peasant farms around the world are using less than 25 per cent of the land – and almost no fossil fuels or chemicals – to feed 70 per cent of humanity.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Master gardener tip of the month

MGOC Trowel Talk / November 2017

My veggie garden hasn’t been tilled for four years and the soil is very rich and healthy. When I started gardening, I was taught that rototilling or double-digging a garden was the way to get organic matter mixed in and to ensure light, friable soil. Today’s science tells us that turning over the soil is actually bad for it. The mycorrhizal fungi and micro-organisms that make the nutrients and trace elements available to the plants are in that top layer of soil. If we constantly work the soil, we are disturbing those organisms – in effect, we are burying them and cutting off their air supply. New ones will colonize but instead of having a continuous, dynamic, healthy soil, you are constantly starting over.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How climate change is already costing you money

TVO / Patrick Metzger / 01 November 2017

It’s been understood for decades that greenhouse gases, produced largely by humanity’s infatuation with fossil fuels, are heating up the planet. However, in spite of 2017’s startling tally of hurricanes, wildfires, and other weather disasters, there remains a widespread misperception — exacerbated by poor media coverage of the climate change connection — that we’re facing a relatively minor problem that won’t hit hard for years, if ever.

This idea is wrong for all kinds of reasons, some of them profoundly alarming. However, even for those so far insulated from the worst of climate-related catastrophe, climate change is already hitting us where it counts — our wallet.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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