Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Food security (133)

How to dehydrate fresh spinach

Mother Earth News / Tammy Taylor, Taylor-Made Homestead / 20 May 2016

It seems spinach is almost a feast-or-famine kind of vegetable — it’s gloriously prolific when it grows, then BOOM! Gone for the season. So, I’m harvesting as much spinach as I can by cutting the leaves to the bottom inch or so of the plant which allows the spinach plant to regrow it’s green leafy goodness for yet another harvest.

But fresh spinach is so perishable and we can only eat so much fresh spinach. I wanted to preserve this spring goodness to enjoy later in the year, so I decided to dehydrate it.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Confessions of a community garden coordinator

Permaculture Research Institute / Rebecca McCarty / 18 April 2017

Since it is now April, and because spring is (finally!) officially upon us up here in Minnesota in the United States, we’re about to start the next growing season in the community garden that I help to plan and coordinate for. For me, the garden absolutely comes with some excitement of yet another opportunity to grow our own food, to build community, and to get outside and spend some time in nature after being cooped up indoors all winter long.

However, it also comes with many of the responsibilities of management in the human realm. This is a level of management that I hadn’t really fully contemplated when I first got involved with the garden. I don’t really regret my involvement with the garden by any means, but there are many things that I’ve learned so far through my experience as a founding member of a community garden planning and coordinating team since it was established five years ago.

I would like to share just a few of the things that I have learned along the way in community garden planning and coordinating. I hope that by sharing my experiences about the community garden that I am involved with, it will help you if you are considering starting a community garden yourself.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Unconventional gardening methods: Pros and cons

Mother Earth News / Shelley Stonebrook / February/March 2017

Novel gardening methods go through phases of prominence on the gardening scene. Perhaps made popular by a new book or a reinvigoration of an old method, there’s always some “hot” technique, product, or way to garden. But what’s just hype, and what really works? Which gardening methods have noted advantages? And which methods make sense for small-scale backyard gardeners versus serious homesteaders or market gardeners? Let’s dig into the benefits and potential hang-ups of six gardening styles you’ve likely heard about lately.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Experts: ‘Myth’ that pesticides are necessary to feed the world

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 07 March 2017

The idea that pesticides are essential to feed a fast-growing global population is a myth, according to UN food and pollution experts.

A new report, being presented to the UN human rights council on Wednesday, is severely critical of the global corporations that manufacture pesticides, accusing them of the “systematic denial of harms”, “aggressive, unethical marketing tactics” and heavy lobbying of governments which has “obstructed reforms and paralysed global pesticide restrictions”.

The report says pesticides have “catastrophic impacts on the environment, human health and society as a whole”, including an estimated 200,000 deaths a year from acute poisoning. Its authors said: “It is time to create a global process to transition toward safer and healthier food and agricultural production.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seedy Saturday is bigger and better than ever this year

Transition Brockville, Brockville Public Library

The Brockville Public Library and Transition Brockville will be hosting the 3rd annual Seedy Saturday free seed swap on Saturday, March 11, from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Brockville Memorial Centre, 100 Magedoma Blvd.

Seed savers and garden lovers are invited to swap and share seeds, and meet and share experiences with local gardeners. Our Seedy Saturday will also feature free planting activities for kids, as well as a seed sprouting demonstration. This year Seedy Saturday is expanding to include special guest speakers on improving your soil (Dave Alguire, 10:30) and starting your own seeds indoors (Jeremy Dutton, 11:00), as well as displays by local food and garden vendors.

Everyone is welcome to attend and pick up free seeds.

If you would like to register and bring your own labeled vegetable and flower seeds to swap, or for more information about Seedy Saturday, please contact Brandy at the library, 613-342-3936 or brandy@brockvillelibrary.ca, or Chris Stesky with Transition Brockville, cstesky@xplornet.com.

Half of all species could be extinct by end of century

The Guardian / Robin McKie / 25 February 2017

“The living fabric of the world is slipping through our fingers without our showing much sign of caring,” say the organisers of the Biological Extinction conference held at the Vatican this week.

Threatened creatures such as the tiger or rhino may make occasional headlines, but little attention is paid to the eradication of most other life forms, they argue. But as the conference will hear, these animals and plants provide us with our food and medicine. They purify our water and air while also absorbing carbon emissions from our cars and factories, regenerating soil, and providing us with aesthetic inspiration.

“Rich western countries are now siphoning up the planet’s resources and destroying its ecosystems at an unprecedented rate,” said biologist Paul Ehrlich, of Stanford University in California. “We want to build highways across the Serengeti to get more rare earth minerals for our cellphones. We grab all the fish from the sea, wreck the coral reefs and put carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. We have triggered a major extinction event. The question is: how do we stop it?”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

 

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