Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Food security (133)

Indoor farm start-up seals deal with Farm Boy

Fieldless Farms / Media release / 05 August 2020

Fieldless Farms, a local Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) start-up, announced today that its cut lettuce mixes have hit shelves in Farm Boy stores. This is an important step for the company, which aims to bring year-round local produce to Canadians and reduce the country’s dependency on foreign imports […]

The company’s first farm in Cornwall, Ontario—which grows leafy greens using highly controlled environments, renewable energy, and without herbicides or pesticides—reached full commissioning and CanadaGAP certification earlier this month. The Farm Boy deal comes just one year after Fieldless quietly closed a $3 million first round of funding from local investors and Farm Credit Canada (FCC).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Loss of bees causes shortage of key food crops, study finds

The Guardian / Oliver Milman / 29 July 2020

A lack of bees in agricultural areas is limiting the supply of some food crops, a new US-based study has found, suggesting that declines in the pollinators may have serious ramifications for global food security.

Species of wild bees, such as bumblebees, are suffering from a loss of flowering habitat, the use of toxic pesticides and, increasingly, the climate crisis. Managed honeybees, meanwhile, are tended to by beekeepers, but have still been assailed by disease, leading to concerns that the three-quarters of the world’s food crops dependent upon pollinators could falter due to a lack of bees.

The new research appears to confirm some of these fears.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Why cities are planting more ‘food forests’

CBC News / Emily Chung / 23 July 2020

Many of us see forests as places to walk, hike and enjoy nature. But more and more cities are planting “food forests” — not just for strolling through, but for growing fruits and veggies.

At the Cowichan Green Community Food Forest in Duncan, B.C., visitors can amble along green microclover pathways in the shade of big-leaf maple trees to pick herbs such as rosemary and savory, vegetables like asparagus, as well as fruits, including salmonberries, grapes, plums, kiwis and figs — for free.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Home canning cardinal rules for first-time food preservers

Mother Earth News / Mary Moss-Sprague / 9 April 2020

Our lives may have been turned topsy-turvy with the global health pandemic, but the can-do spirit of many people is very much alive and well. Many are turning to nature both for comfort and sustenance. That’s a very good thing, especially when it comes to growing and preserving our own food.

As a trained and certified Master Food Preserver, one of my main concerns about food preservation is that of food safety. It doesn’t do any good to go through the process of canning or otherwise preserving foods if it is done incorrectly and unsafely. If you’re an old hand at canning, you know how important it is to adhere to processing procedures and times, good for you! If, however, you’re new to this time-honored skill, keep in mind that established recipes and procedures exist for a reason.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Abattoir crisis aired at Eco Farm Day

Eastern Ontario AgriNews / Tom Van Dusen / 5 March 2020

With this year’s theme “On Common Ground: Food and Farming in a Shifting Climate,” the event previously dedicated primarily to organic growing for niche farmers has widened its scope by looking at the increasing impact of climate change, the farm income crisis, and the loss of farmland. The 2020 event unrolled on Feb. 22 and 23 in Cornwall.

“When we recognize that we face common struggles, we find support and solutions in one another,” the organizing team stated, inviting participants in the 2020 conference to spend time learning from, and connecting with, each other while acting collectively to “co-create regenerative and resilient food and farming systems.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Giving the green thumbs up to community gardens in LG&L

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit / Press Release / 1 May 2020

Residents in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark will be able to start planting in community gardens soon. On April 25, 2020 the government of Ontario lifted restrictions, allowing community gardens to operate following the guidance of the local Medical Officer of Health. Dr. Paula Stewart, Medical Officer of Health for the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit supports Ontario’s decision. ”Community gardens increase access to healthy foods, provide a sense of community belonging, and support mental well-being, and physical activity”.

Under the provincial Emergency Order, only gardens with the capacity to follow the requirements are permitted to operate.The Health Unit has prepared safe operating requirements for local municipalities, community organizations related to: entrance restrictions, physical distancing, hand hygiene, sharing and cleaning of equipment, signage, and communication.

In addition, rules and guidelines for community gardeners have been developed and should be followed by all users.

[ FULL PRESS RELEASE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
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