Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Extreme weather (149)

Climate change pushing world into ‘uncharted territory’

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 21 March 2017

2016 saw the hottest global average among thermometer measurements stretching back to 1880. But scientific research indicates the world was last this warm about 115,000 years ago and that the planet has not experienced such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere for 4m years.

2017 has seen temperature records continue to tumble, in the US where February was exceptionally warm, and in Australia, where prolonged and extreme heat struck many states. The consequences have been particularly stark at the poles.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Is it okay to enjoy the warm winters of climate change?

The Atlantic / Robinson Meyer / 23 February 2017

How much should we really be enjoying weather so unseasonal, so suggestive of the consequences of climate change, when we’re doing so little to combat the larger phenomenon? If we think the future consequences of climate change will be very bad, are we allowed to savor them now?

There is, of course, no single right answer to this query, and it is an ethical or existential concern as much as a scientific one. But when I posed it to the scientists who encounter climate change’s consequences first-hand—in the planet’s expanding deserts, deluged coasts, and bleached coral reefs—they said that it was fine to take the good with the bad when it came to upheavals in Earth’s longterm climate.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2016 hottest year ever recorded – and human activity to blame

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 18 January 2017

2016 was the hottest year on record, setting a new high for the third year in a row, with scientists firmly putting the blame on human activities that drive climate change.

The final data for 2016 was released on Wednesday by the three key agencies – the UK Met Office and Nasa and Noaa in the US – and showed 16 of the 17 hottest years on record have been this century.

Direct temperature measurements stretch back to 1880, but scientific research indicates the world was last this warm about 115,000 years ago and that the planet has not experienced such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere for 4m years.

In 2016, global warming delivered scorching temperatures around the world. The resulting extreme weather means the impacts of climate change on people are coming sooner and with more ferocity than expected, according to scientists.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

WEF: Climate change is the world’s biggest risk

Climate Central / Brian Kahn / 12 January 2017

The rise of the machines isn’t the biggest threat to humanity. It’s climate change, extreme weather and other environmental factors.

The World Economic Forum surveyed 750 experts on what the most likely and impactful risks facing humanity are in 2017. In a report released Thursday, they ranked extreme weather as the most likely risk and the second-most impactful, trailing only the use of weapons of mass destruction. Climate change is responsible for driving an increase in the likelihood and intensity of extreme weather events, notably heat waves.

Failing to adapt to or mitigate climate change and a host of other climate-connected risks including water and food crises and involuntary migration also rank in the top 10.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Summer drought continues into the winter

Cat Tales / Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority / Winter/Spring 2017

The lack of rain was the lead story in the previous edition of Cat Tales and continues to create headlines – and headaches – for folks living within the CRCA jurisdiction.

As of the writing of this article, in early December, officials with the Cataraqui Region Water Response Team had deemed that the region was still in a moderate drought situation, downgrading it on Nov. 15 from severe where it had been for much of the summer and fall. That action came about after there was a significant amount of rainfall in mid-October helping stream flows and groundwater to rise to levels where supply was barely meeting demand. At this level, officials still recommend that water users practice conservation with at least a 20 per cent reduction in normal usage. As recently as Nov. 2, the ‘severe’ tag was still in place.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2016 broke record for damage caused by natural disasters

Toronto Star / Peter Goffin / 09 January 2017

Canada’s insurance industry is calling on all levels of government to improve climate-change preparedness, after a record-breaking year of damage caused by natural disasters.

The Insurance Bureau of Canada says $4.9 billion in insurable damage was caused by natural disasters such as wildfires, floods and ice storms across the country in 2016.

It’s the most ever in a single year.

Damage costs have increased steadily since the 1980s, says the IBC.

They are expected to keep growing.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

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