Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Extreme weather (123)

Floodplain Mapping Update proposed

City of Brockville / 10 November 2017

Project Description

Review and update floodplain mapping for Buell’s and Butler’s Creeks.

Project Rationale

The City’s creek systems react relatively quickly to rainfall and snowmelt events. There are several areas where homes and businesses are close enough to the creeks to be potentially vulnerable during flooding events. Applying improved mapping technology to a larger database of creek flow records, and taking into consideration recent developments will result in greater accuracy in comparison to the 1997 floodplain mapping. The project would be jointly funded by the City, Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority and Public Safety Canada (conditionally approved through the National Disaster Mitigation Program)

[ PROPOSED 2018 CAPITAL BUDGET OPERATIONS ]

How climate change is already costing you money

TVO / Patrick Metzger / 01 November 2017

It’s been understood for decades that greenhouse gases, produced largely by humanity’s infatuation with fossil fuels, are heating up the planet. However, in spite of 2017’s startling tally of hurricanes, wildfires, and other weather disasters, there remains a widespread misperception — exacerbated by poor media coverage of the climate change connection — that we’re facing a relatively minor problem that won’t hit hard for years, if ever.

This idea is wrong for all kinds of reasons, some of them profoundly alarming. However, even for those so far insulated from the worst of climate-related catastrophe, climate change is already hitting us where it counts — our wallet.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The relationship between hurricanes and climate change

New York Times / John Schwartz / 25 August 2017

Katharine Hayhoe, a climate scientist at Texas Tech University and an author of the report, said even if global warming does not change the number of storms — and, she noted, there could even be fewer hurricanes over all — tropical storms and hurricanes do gain energy from warm water, so the unusually warm water that has accompanied climate change “can have a role in intensifying a storm that already exists.”

More moisture in the atmosphere, she said, means the amount and intensity of rain associated with hurricanes and other storms is growing. While people might think of high winds and storm surge as the risks of hurricanes, she said, “freshwater flooding is potentially a much greater problem than the storm surge.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Weather pushes Ontario farmers to brink of disaster

Global News / Jeanne Pengelly / 13 July 2017

After last year’s dry, hot summer — one of the driest and hottest on record — farmers were hoping for a reprieve. The stunted crops last year led to a shortage of feed. Many local farmers, [beef farmer David] Whittington included, had to cull up to half their herds of cattle because they couldn’t feed them.

Now this year, the weather is dealing up the opposite — so much rain that the hay is soggy.

“No matter how old you are, we haven’t seen weather like this,” Whittington added. “Last year, we had the driest summer in a hundred years and now we have the wettest in 150 years.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Freaked out by the New York magazine climate story? Good.

Vox / David Roberts / 11 July 2017

David Wallace-Wells has a cover story on climate change in New York magazine that has kicked up quite a discussion.

It’s about worst-case scenarios, i.e., what is likely to happen if we do nothing to change our current greenhouse-gas emissions trajectory. It answers the question: How bad could it get?

Turns out, it could get pretty bad. The dystopian future the piece describes is much worse, and forecast to happen much sooner, than most people — even people fairly well-versed in climate change — understand.

I won’t rehearse the parade of horribles, which range from exotic new (or old) diseases to starvation, dehydration, forced migration, and armed conflict. Instead, I want to address some of the critical reaction to the piece, which I have found … irksome.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Maize, rice, wheat: alarm at rising climate risk to vital crops

The Guardian / Robin McKie / 15 July 2017

The particular risk outlined by the study envisaged simultaneous catastrophic disruptions in China and the US. In 2014 total world production of maize was around 1 billion tonnes, with the US producing 360 million tonnes and China growing 215 million. If production in these two countries were hit by simultaneous extreme weather events, most likely droughts, more than 60% of global maize production would be hit.

A double whammy like this has never happened in the past, but the work by the Met Office indicates that there is now a real risk. In addition, there may be risks of similar events affecting rice, wheat or soya harvests. These are now being studied by the Met Office, which is also working with researchers in China in a bid to understand climate risks that might affect agricultural production.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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