Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Extreme weather (91)

City hopes new climate agency rains data, cash

London Free Press / Megan Stacey / 08 January 2018

City staff and politicians are welcoming plans for a new provincial agency to help direct the response to climate change, hoping it could bring London more of the data and funding it needs.

The new organization — a not-for-profit proposed by the province to build awareness, provide programming, and develop better regional weather data — could be just what London needs to combat the impacts of climate change, they say.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How a warming Arctic fuels cold snaps

InsideClimate News / Bob Berwyn / 28 September 2017

When winter sets in, “polar vortex” becomes one of the most dreaded phrases in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s enough to send shivers even before the first blast of bitter cold arrives.

New research shows that some northern regions have been getting hit with these extreme cold spells more frequently over the past four decades, even as the planet as a whole has warmed. While it may seem counterintuitive, the scientists believe these bitter cold snaps are connected to the warming of the Arctic and the effects that that warming is having on the winds of the stratospheric polar vortex, high above the Earth’s surface.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Happening faster than expected, and more extreme

Inside Climate News / Bob Berwyn / 26 December 2017

In the past year, the scientific consensus shifted toward a grimmer and less uncertain picture of the risks posed by climate change.

When the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its 5th Climate Assessment in 2014, it formally declared that observed warming was “extremely likely” to be mostly caused by human activity.

This year, a major scientific update from the United States Global Change Research Program put it more bluntly: “There is no convincing alternative explanation.”

Other scientific authorities have issued similar assessments.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Canada’s top 10 weather stories 2017

Environment and Climate Change Canada / 20 December 2017

Worldwide changes in extreme precipitation and temperature are consistent with what we anticipate from global warming. Science is linking climate change with increased risk of forest fires, floods, heavy rains, and the most powerful hurricanes. Canadians experienced many of these extremes in 2017.

As the Top 10 Weather Stories of 2017 confirm, our communities must become more resilient – not only for what lies ahead, but for the changing climate that is already on our doorstep.

Canadians had plenty to “weather” in 2017. Property damage from weather extremes cost Canadian insurers and governments millions of dollars. Between the few floods, the many wildfires and record dry temperatures, 2017 was a year of too much — too dry, too hot, too fiery, too wet, too cool, but not too cold.

It was the eighth warmest period in 70 years of reporting weather, with temperatures averaging 1.4°C above normal. This year also marked the 21st consecutive year warmer than normal, matching the trend for the rest of the world.

From a list of 100 significant weather events that occurred across Canada in 2017, we picked the top 10 weather stories that were the most significant. These stories were selected based on the degree of impact on Canadians, the size of area affected, the economic and environmental effects and how long it remained a top news story in Canadian media.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Climate change-enhanced jets of flame rage across S California

RobertScribbler.com / 07 December 2017

Fimbul is an old icelandic word for mighty, giant, great. It is an archaic word that has fallen out of modern use. But considering the fact that the fires now ripping through Southern California are both out of the context of recent milder climates and have explosively expanded to gigantic proportion, it is perhaps time that we should re-introduce the term.

Sections of Southern California are now experiencing never-before-seen levels of fire hazard as winds gusting to near 80 mph across the region are fanning five out of control blazes. The fires are burning during what should be the cooler month of December. But cool conditions have eluded that part of the state. And the blow-torch like Santa Ana winds that are fanning the flames are being enhanced by conditions consistent with human-caused climate change.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brace for bad winter

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 21 November 2017

His advice for Brockville residents? Be prepared.

With the possibility of wind and ice, [meteorologist Michael] Carter said residents should be ready for power outages and blackouts with an alternative heat and power source as well as drinking water.

The more frequent storms mean that residents should be sure their cars are in good working order and that the snow tires are on, he said.

“And be a good neighbour, be a good friend, and check in on friends and relatives who might not be able to do as much for themselves,” he said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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