Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Energy conservation (42)

Zero Carbon Building Standard

Canada Green Building Council / May 2017

The Canadian green building sector has been active – for decades – in finding ways to limit harmful impacts from the built environment. While many of these efforts have been voluntary, an increasing number of governments across the country have recognized the potential of the building sector to fight climate change and have set more specific targets. To meet the COP21 goal of keeping global average temperature increases well below 2ºC, green building organizations around the world are supporting the objective of eliminating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the operation of new buildings by 2030, and eliminating the GHG emissions from all buildings by 2050.

To meet those targets, bold new approaches are required to drive innovation. For its part, the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) has created a new zero carbon standard for assessing the carbon performance of commercial, institutional, and multi-family buildings in Canada. The CaGBC Zero Carbon Building Standard is a unique, made-in-Canada solution to achieving our climate change commitments, providing a path for both new and existing buildings to reach zero carbon.

[ EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ]

Study: Believe you can stop climate change and you will

phys.org / University of Warwick / 04 May 2017

“Often climate change messages try to persuade the public by increasing belief that climate change is real, or through fear of its dire consequences. But mere belief in climate change is not enough, and fear can backfire if we feel helpless and overwhelmed.

“It is vitally important that individuals appreciate the impact and value of their own actions for us to make a meaningful change as a whole.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Low-cost housing apartment to be Passive House certified

Heads Up: Building Energy Efficiency / Volume 4, Issue 3

Paying only $28 per year in heating costs sounds too good to be true, but it has become reality in an Ottawa neighbourhood. A recently opened affordable housing complex is expected to be the first of its kind in North America to be Passive House certified.

The four-storey, 42-unit residence, built by Ottawa Salus, a charitable organization, offers housing for adults with severe mental illness. It was designed with strict environmental and cost-saving goals in mind, and it is estimated that the apartment building will be up to 90 percent more efficient than regular buildings. Ottawa Salus anticipates that the yearly energy consumption from the apartment building will be the same as that associated with a single family dwelling.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Sustainable is Possible

TEDx Talks / 4 December 2013

Ma’ikwe Schaub Ludwig is the Executive Director of Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage, the pioneering sustainability educator who heads up Ecovillage Education US, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Fellowship for Intentional Community. She believes strongly that sustainability is possible, assuming we can learn to cooperate, share and assess what really makes us happy, rather than staying bought in to the material excess culture we’ve been raised in.

City could save on energy: Report

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 18 November 2016

sewage-treatment-plantBrockville should not hire an “embedded energy manager,” but it can still save money on energy by monitoring consumption better, say consultants hired by city hall to look into the matter.

A report by the consulting firm Energy Performance Services (EPS) suggests the city spend more than $83,000 to upgrade monitoring at the water and sewer plants, adding this would eventually yield more than $32,000 in annual energy savings.

City officials will decide next year whether to follow through on the recommendation.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

A renewable home energy retrofit: How we did it

Mother Earth News / Ron Davis / June/July 2015

solar-power-arrayI must admit that our transition away from fossil fuels isn’t complete. Much of what we buy — including a great deal of our food and even the energy-saving equipment we’ve installed in our home — is produced and shipped using fossil fuel energy. We can and will take further steps to wean ourselves off fossil fuels, but life altogether independent of them may not be possible in our economy without full withdrawal from it and a return to the kind of lifestyle that existed before the Industrial Revolution. Lee and I are incredibly pleased, though, with what we’ve accomplished. Reducing our carbon footprint has been a major emotional boost for us. We value knowing that our home is powered by solar energy that we, ourselves, collect, and that the good Earth shares its heat in winter and accepts our heat in summer by way of our geothermal system. Many people in our community have visited our home to check out our systems and ask us questions as they get started taking steps to cut their own carbon footprints. It’s immensely gratifying to be that example for others.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 7

The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.