Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Emissions control (146)

Zero Carbon Building Standard

Canada Green Building Council / May 2017

The Canadian green building sector has been active – for decades – in finding ways to limit harmful impacts from the built environment. While many of these efforts have been voluntary, an increasing number of governments across the country have recognized the potential of the building sector to fight climate change and have set more specific targets. To meet the COP21 goal of keeping global average temperature increases well below 2ºC, green building organizations around the world are supporting the objective of eliminating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the operation of new buildings by 2030, and eliminating the GHG emissions from all buildings by 2050.

To meet those targets, bold new approaches are required to drive innovation. For its part, the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) has created a new zero carbon standard for assessing the carbon performance of commercial, institutional, and multi-family buildings in Canada. The CaGBC Zero Carbon Building Standard is a unique, made-in-Canada solution to achieving our climate change commitments, providing a path for both new and existing buildings to reach zero carbon.

[ EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ]

Downtown Brockville plugs in for EVs

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 03 June 2017

Downtown Brockville has its first public charging units for electric vehicles.

The two Level 2 EV charging units are located in the underground parking parking garage at the Aquatarium.

The charging is free, but users would pay the $3-per-hour fee to park.

The Thousand Islands Community Development Corporation, the City of Brockville, the Downtown Business Improvement Area, the Aquatarium and 401 Electric chipped in to pay for stations.

The city, DBIA and the chamber of commerce hope that the charging stations will act as a magnet to attract electric cars on the 401 to the downtown.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

New book ranks the top 100 solutions to climate change

Vox / David Roberts / 10 May 2017

By now, the looming dangers of climate change are clear to anyone who’s been paying attention, covered extensively in both academic literature and the popular press.

But what about solutions?

For all the hand-wringing on climate change over the years, discussion of solutions remains puzzlingly anemic and fractured. A few high-profile approaches, mainly around renewable energy and electric cars, dominate discussion and modeling. But there’s been no real way for ordinary people to get an understanding of what they can do and what impact it can have. There remains no single, comprehensive, reliable compendium of carbon-reduction solutions across sectors.

At least until now.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The economic case for retrofitting buildings

Globe & Mail / Toon Dreessen / 17 February 2017

A study of Bentall Kennedy’s North American real estate portfolio of more than 300 buildings found that environmentally friendly office properties net 3.7 per cent higher rents. In their Canadian holdings, occupancy rates in environmentally certified buildings were 18.7 per cent higher than non-certified.

The study, conducted by University of Guelph professor Avis Devine and co-author Nils Kok of Maastricht University in The Netherlands, calls tenants in green buildings “stickier” and “happier.” Tenants stay put in their space, she says, and reduce landlord leasing costs associated with turnover.

Plus, as governments move to increase the costs of carbon, which have now been benchmarked at $50 per tonne by 2022, there will be a strong incentive for building owners to reduce operational costs related to emissions and energy use.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Opportunities for clean-tech firms in procurement strategy

Globe & Mail / Shawn McCarthy / 03 May 2017

The federal government is determined to incorporate clean-tech technologies in its overall procurement strategy, promising to award extra points for bidders who include such innovation in their proposals.

Ottawa spends $23-billion annually on procurement and is working on a series of measures to enhance participation of the clean-tech sector, including a set-aside for small- and medium-size businesses and bonus points for using innovative technologies, Arianne Reza, assistant deputy minister for public services and procurement Canada, said on Wednesday.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Study: Believe you can stop climate change and you will

phys.org / University of Warwick / 04 May 2017

“Often climate change messages try to persuade the public by increasing belief that climate change is real, or through fear of its dire consequences. But mere belief in climate change is not enough, and fear can backfire if we feel helpless and overwhelmed.

“It is vitally important that individuals appreciate the impact and value of their own actions for us to make a meaningful change as a whole.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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