Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Emissions control (243)

How to keep warm on a patio without heating the planet

CBC News / Emily Chung / 15 October 2020

Thanks to the risks the COVID-19 pandemic has brought to indoor dining and socializing, patio heaters have been flying off store shelves as the weather has become cooler.

But many of them burn fossil fuels to — essentially — heat the outdoors. The French energy think-tank Negawatt estimates that using five propane heaters to heat a roughly 800-square-foot patio from November to March will emit as much CO2 as a car circling the Earth three times.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Tips for keeping your Inbox clean and green

TechSoup Canada / Chiara C. / 27 August 2020

Clearly, there are big and important changes that need to be made in the future of our digital infrastructure. Thinking about the scale of the change required can feel out of reach for the average online user interested in supporting the shift towards sustainability. That said, understanding what’s behind our data usage can be a powerful entry point for reducing our online carbon footprint and provides an accessible way to start making a difference.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The climate case for building 15-minute neighbourhoods

Ecology Ottawa / Accessed 06 September 2020

The links between urban sprawl and climate change are well-documented in cities and regions around the world, but are perhaps best encapsulated for Ottawa’s context by former Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Dr. Dianne Saxe. Dr. Saxe has called urban sprawl “Ontario’s oil sands” – it’s the province’s main driver of greenhouse gas emissions, has a wide array of other environmental costs, and is bound up with a complex web of political and financial interests that benefit from the status quo.

More sprawl means people must travel further – often by car – to get to jobs and basic amenities. It also typically means more carbon-intensive housing patterns, with energy inefficient single-detached homes dominating instead of more compact forms. In Ontario (the Toronto area is shown below), there’s a clear link between climate pollution and urban form – with dense, walkable communities seeing the lowest levels of emissions.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Dufferin County to assess all new projects with a ‘climate lens’

Orangeville.com / Alexandra Heck / 27 August 2020

Local environmentalists are applauding the County of Dufferin’s new plan to add an environmental scope to every project going forward.

As part of the municipality’s goals to mitigate climate change, county staff will be adding a climate portion to reports on items being considered by council […]

The scope of the “climate lens” will assess whether or not a new infrastructure would create greenhouse gas emissions and whether or not those impacts can be mitigated.

It will also consider whether there will be any danger for people or property in extreme weather events, like drought or flood.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Manitoulin Island prepares for climate change

Manitoulin Expositor / 14 August 2020

Smart Green Communities, a reThink Green program working in consultation with municipalities, townships and First Nation communities throughout Manitoulin Island and the North Shore, has launched a public consultation on two regional energy and emissions plans (REEPs): a two-year study of the region’s collective greenhouse emissions and what that means for the future.

The primary goal of the REEPs is to assist these communities in meeting their energy and emission reduction goals by understanding how much they currently emit. This work paves the way for more collaboration between municipalities and communities to reduce their energy costs, decrease carbon emissions and address the identified risks of climate change.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How cutting speed limits could slow climate change

CBC News / Emily Chung / 13 August 2020

According to Natural Resources Canada, driving a vehicle with an internal combustion engine at 120 km/h burns 20 per cent more fuel than driving at 100 km/h. An Ontario law that requires trucks to install technology to limit their speed to 105 km/h was estimated to have reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 4.6 megatonnes between 2009 and 2020.

That’s largely because air resistance increases exponentially at higher speeds, reducing a vehicle’s fuel efficiency and generating more pollution per kilometre.

In addition, certain pollutants such as nitrogen oxides are generated mainly at higher speeds.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
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