Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Emissions control (266)

How grassroots schemes across UK are tackling climate crisis

The Guardian / Matthew Taylor / 10 March 2021

Communities across the UK are tackling the climate crisis with hundreds of local schemes ranging from neighbourhood heating to food co-ops, community land ownership projects and flood defences, according to a report.

A study from the IPPR thinktank found that community projects, often set up with the primary aim of reducing poverty and improving people’s day-to-day lives, were also reducing emissions and restoring nature.

Luke Murphy, the lead author of the report, said: “Under the radar there are already flourishing and transformative community initiatives to pool resources and create shared low-carbon energy, housing and natural assets … These groups have shown that they can increase community wealth and create thriving places while addressing the climate crisis.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mann: ‘Good people fall victim to doomism. I do too sometimes’

The Guardian / Jonathan Watts / 27 February 2021

The author and eminent climate scientist on the deniers’ new tactics and why positive change feels closer than it has done in 20 years

Michael E Mann is one of the world’s most influential climate scientists. He rose to prominence in 1999 as the co-author of the “hockey-stick graph”, which showed the sharp rise in global temperatures since the industrial age. This was the clearest evidence anyone had provided of the link between human emissions and global warming. This made him a target. He and other scientists have been subject to “climategate” email hacking, personal abuse and online trolling. In his new book, The New Climate War, he argues the tide may finally be turning in a hopeful direction.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

OECD chief bows out with climate rally cry

The Guardian / 17 February 2021 / Fiona Harvey

“The single most urgent, emergent, immediate risk is to combat Covid-19, and its health, economic and social consequences,” [OECD secretary general Ángel Gurría] told the Guardian. “But the single most important intergenerational responsibility is to protect the planet … We are on a collision course with nature and we have to change course for future generations.”

[He] listed the ways in which the world needed to act: “To protect biodiversity, to stop it from being degraded; to protect soil; to protected lands and water; to protect the oceans from the worst overfishing; to protect coral reefs, which are in danger of disappearing at 2C [of global heating]; to protect mangroves, which are extraordinary carbon sinks; glaciers and so on.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

500+ scientists demand stop to tree burning as climate solution

Common Dreams / Andrea Germanos / 12 February 2021

Referring to forest “preservation and restoration” as key in meeting the nations’ declared goals of carbon neutrality by 2050, the letter frames the slashing of trees for bioenergy as “misguided.”

“We urge you not to undermine both climate goals and the world’s biodiversity by shifting from burning fossil fuels to burning trees to generate energy,” the group wrote.

The destruction of forests, which are a carbon sink, creates a “carbon debt.” And though regrowing “trees and displacement of fossil fuels may eventually pay off this carbon debt,” the signatories say that “regrowth takes time the world does not have to solve climate change.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Canada and U.S. drastically underestimate methane emissions

The Energy Mix / Mitchell Beer / 3 February 2021

Federal environmental agencies are underestimating methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells by 20% in the United States and 150% in Canada, according to a McGill University study published late last month in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, one of several in recent weeks that have pointed to a mounting crisis in releases of the climate-busting gas.

From oil and gas operations and abandoned wells in North America, to urban gas lines in Europe, to farms in China and coal mines everywhere, the reports point to unexpectedly high emissions of a greenhouse gas that is 84 times more potent than carbon dioxide over the crucial, 20-year span when humanity will be scrambling to get climate change under control.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

‘Hockey stick’ scientist talks about the ‘New Climate War’

CBC News / Bob McDonald / 29 January 2021

Climate scientist Michael Mann is possibly best known for the iconic “hockey stick” graph published in 1998 that showed the steep rise in planetary temperatures.

He was also one of the targets of a massive email hack dubbed “Climategate” aimed at discrediting climate scientists.

As a result of all this he gained an intimate knowledge of the strategies of those who are attempting to resist climate action — climate change deniers, and those trying to derail the political and social changes necessary to fight climate change.

Recently he’s started seeing those strategies shift. In his new book, The New Climate War, he lays out what he’s seeing, and what he thinks we need to do to preserve our planet. He spoke with Bob McDonald about his new book.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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