Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Emergency preparedness (32)

There will be floods — and Ontario’s not ready for them

TVO / Tim Alamenciak / 20 February 2018

The audience at the Provincial Flood Forecasting and Warning Workshop sat silently as the rug was pulled out from under them.

Municipal and provincial staff — many of them forecasters and emergency managers — were gathered at a Brampton conference centre to hear Gord Miller, Ontario’s former environmental commissioner, talk about climate change. What he had to say challenged many of the established practices and assumptions that had guided their careers.

His point was this: climate change has altered the fundamentals of the weather system. All of our old predictions — which were used to build thousands of kilometres of road, drainage pipe, and sewers — are inadequate. The changes to the weather system are so profound that old models and methods can’t accurately predict what’s going to happen; new models predict catastrophes so great that preparing for them could lead to bankruptcy.

“I don’t think here in Canada we understand what’s coming,” said Miller during the talk. “We have no predictability any more. One has to look from the perspective that all culverts are undersized. All sewers are undersized.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

You’re just not prepared for what’s coming

Peak Prosperity / Chris Martenson / 01 December 2017

After spending more than a decade warning people all over the world about the futility of pursuing infinite exponential economic growth on a finite planet, I can tell you this: very few are even aware of the nature of our predicament.

An even smaller subset is either physically or financially ready for the sort of future barreling down on us. Even fewer are mentally prepared for it.

And make no mistake: it’s the mental and emotional preparation that matters the most. If you can’t cope with adversity and uncertainty, you’re going to be toast in the coming years.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brace for bad winter

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 21 November 2017

His advice for Brockville residents? Be prepared.

With the possibility of wind and ice, [meteorologist Michael] Carter said residents should be ready for power outages and blackouts with an alternative heat and power source as well as drinking water.

The more frequent storms mean that residents should be sure their cars are in good working order and that the snow tires are on, he said.

“And be a good neighbour, be a good friend, and check in on friends and relatives who might not be able to do as much for themselves,” he said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ottawa gets it right on funding for disaster mitigation

Globe & Mail / Don Forgeron / 30 April 2017

Lost in all the talk and analysis of the most recent federal budget was a landmark investment of $2-billion for disaster mitigation funding – the largest infusion of dollars dedicated to disaster mitigation in Canada’s history. The investment is designed to reduce the almost $9-billion spent by the federal government in unbudgeted disaster relief expenditures from 2005 projected through 2020.

Many commentators completely missed the significance of this investment.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Most billion-dollar weather disasters for a 1st quarter

The Weather Network / Jonathan Belles / 07 April 2017

The first three months of 2017 claimed the most billion-dollar weather disasters for the same stretch of any year on record, according to a report released Thursday by NOAA.

Five separate disasters, ranging from tornado outbreaks and wind damage to late season freezes that wiped out crops in the South, racked up damage tolls over $1 billion.

This frequency of billion-dollar events is the largest since records began in 1980 and more than doubles the average number of 2.4 such disasters over the last five years.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2016 broke record for damage caused by natural disasters

Toronto Star / Peter Goffin / 09 January 2017

Canada’s insurance industry is calling on all levels of government to improve climate-change preparedness, after a record-breaking year of damage caused by natural disasters.

The Insurance Bureau of Canada says $4.9 billion in insurable damage was caused by natural disasters such as wildfires, floods and ice storms across the country in 2016.

It’s the most ever in a single year.

Damage costs have increased steadily since the 1980s, says the IBC.

They are expected to keep growing.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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