Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Emergency preparedness (31)

You’re just not prepared for what’s coming

Peak Prosperity / Chris Martenson / 01 December 2017

After spending more than a decade warning people all over the world about the futility of pursuing infinite exponential economic growth on a finite planet, I can tell you this: very few are even aware of the nature of our predicament.

An even smaller subset is either physically or financially ready for the sort of future barreling down on us. Even fewer are mentally prepared for it.

And make no mistake: it’s the mental and emotional preparation that matters the most. If you can’t cope with adversity and uncertainty, you’re going to be toast in the coming years.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brace for bad winter

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 21 November 2017

His advice for Brockville residents? Be prepared.

With the possibility of wind and ice, [meteorologist Michael] Carter said residents should be ready for power outages and blackouts with an alternative heat and power source as well as drinking water.

The more frequent storms mean that residents should be sure their cars are in good working order and that the snow tires are on, he said.

“And be a good neighbour, be a good friend, and check in on friends and relatives who might not be able to do as much for themselves,” he said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ottawa gets it right on funding for disaster mitigation

Globe & Mail / Don Forgeron / 30 April 2017

Lost in all the talk and analysis of the most recent federal budget was a landmark investment of $2-billion for disaster mitigation funding – the largest infusion of dollars dedicated to disaster mitigation in Canada’s history. The investment is designed to reduce the almost $9-billion spent by the federal government in unbudgeted disaster relief expenditures from 2005 projected through 2020.

Many commentators completely missed the significance of this investment.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Most billion-dollar weather disasters for a 1st quarter

The Weather Network / Jonathan Belles / 07 April 2017

The first three months of 2017 claimed the most billion-dollar weather disasters for the same stretch of any year on record, according to a report released Thursday by NOAA.

Five separate disasters, ranging from tornado outbreaks and wind damage to late season freezes that wiped out crops in the South, racked up damage tolls over $1 billion.

This frequency of billion-dollar events is the largest since records began in 1980 and more than doubles the average number of 2.4 such disasters over the last five years.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2016 broke record for damage caused by natural disasters

Toronto Star / Peter Goffin / 09 January 2017

Canada’s insurance industry is calling on all levels of government to improve climate-change preparedness, after a record-breaking year of damage caused by natural disasters.

The Insurance Bureau of Canada says $4.9 billion in insurable damage was caused by natural disasters such as wildfires, floods and ice storms across the country in 2016.

It’s the most ever in a single year.

Damage costs have increased steadily since the 1980s, says the IBC.

They are expected to keep growing.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Canada not ready for climate change, report warns

Globe and Mail / Shawn McCarthy / 30 October 2016

norris-armThe insurance industry is particularly concerned about rising costs for flood and other weather-related disasters, including this year’s devastating fire in Fort McMurray, Alta. Payouts have soared and seven of the past eight years have seen insured costs from natural disasters exceeding $1-billion.

Prof. Feltmate’s report surveyed each province and the Yukon on 12 factors related to preparedness to limit flood damage. They included flood-plain mapping and land-use planning; the availability of home adaptation audits and commercial property; and climate-related assessments of transportation, energy, drinking water and sewage systems.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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