Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Emergency preparedness (41)

Floods, freezing rain and high winds: are you really ready?

Toronto Star / Carola Vyhnak / 02 January 2020

Whether you live in a house, condo or apartment, “there’s no one who doesn’t have some sort of risk,” Fraser said. “I can’t emphasize enough how important it is for every family and individual to be prepared.”

The emergency plan should include steps to get everyone out safely, a meeting place and means of communicating with displaced family members, says Fraser, calling the Red Cross’s “Be Ready” app a “critical” tool.

With winter’s snow and ice storms threatening power outages, Fraser advised equipping a grab-and-go kit with enough water, food, cash and prescription medication for 72 hours. It should also contain copies of important documents, a battery or hand-cranked radio, phone charger, flashlight and batteries, candles, matches, a can opener, and a book or playing cards to pass the time.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Will your EV keep the lights on when the grid goes down?

GTM / Justin Gerdes / 08 November 2019

Last month’s preventative power shutoffs in California highlighted the vulnerability of the electricity grid to threats exacerbated by a changing climate.

In the wake of the forced outages, much has been written about the ability of solar PV arrays working in tandem with stationary battery storage systems to keep the lights on when the grid goes down. But what about the mobile battery packs carried in the hundreds of thousands of electric vehicles now on the road in California?

For much of any given day, EVs are parked in garages or at offices. When paired with a power control system, the battery packs in those EVs are functionally little different than a stationary battery system.

One big difference: EV battery packs are much larger.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Emergency Preparedness for Rural Residents

Transition Brockville / 13 November 2019

How communities can build psychological resilience to disaster

National Observer / Nicole Westman / 08 November 2019

As climate change makes natural disasters more common and more extreme, cities and communities are working to improve their resilience—their ability to withstand disaster, and bounce back quickly when it occurs. But disasters don’t just cause physical damage; they can leave communities struggling mentally and emotionally, as well. Working to shore up physical structures only tackles part of the problem, says Gerald Galloway, a professor of civil and environmental engineering in the Center for Disaster Resilience at the University of Maryland. “If a community can’t stand on its own two feet psychologically, all the work on having stronger buildings isn’t going to get you anywhere.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Multi-Sector Climate Impact Assessment

Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks / 07 November 2019

The assessment will help the province better understand where and how it is vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and will provide information to communities to help them undertake a more strategic approach to adaptation planning and infrastructure investments to prevent and mitigate climate change risks.

“Our government is taking action in the global fight to reduce emissions and strengthen our resilience to the impacts of climate change that are already happening in our communities, such as more frequent extreme weather events and flooding,” said Jeff Yurek, Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks. “This impact assessment will help the province, municipalities, Indigenous communities and other local partners make more informed and timely decisions to keep communities and people healthy and safe.”

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

Emergency survival kits

Mother Earth News / Matthew Stein / December 2010/January 2011

In today’s world of blackouts, big storms, terror alerts and global warming, many of us will experience significant disruptions in the flow of electricity or goods at some point in our lives. Having an emergency survival kit can be a big comfort and aid — maybe even a lifesaver — in such a situation. Stocking up on a few supplies, learning new skills and making an emergency contingency plan don’t have to take a lot of time or money, and these steps will foster peace of mind in turbulent times.

You can’t plan for all possible scenarios, but a wise person plans for the most likely possibilities and stores at least a few basic supplies for emergencies. The tips here will help you evaluate your needs and goals, and plan for short-term emergency situations (72 hours to one week).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
TB Projects

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