Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Economic disruption (80)

The future ain’t what it used to be

Peak Prosperity / Chris Martenson / 30 March 2018

This marks our 10th year of doing this. And by “this”, we mean using data, logic and reason to support the very basic conclusion that infinite growth on a finite planet is impossible.

Surprisingly, this simple, rational idea — despite its huge and fast-growing pile of corroborating evidence — still encounters tremendous pushback from society. Why? Because it runs afoul of most people’s deep-seated belief systems.

Our decade of experience delivering this message has hammered home what behavioral scientists have been telling us for years — that, with rare exceptions, we humans are not rational. We’re rationalizers. We try to force our perception of reality to fit our beliefs; rather than the other way around.

Which is why the vast amount of grief, angst and encroaching dread that most people feel in western cultures today is likely due to the fact that, deep down, whether we’re willing to admit it to ourselves or not, everybody already knows the truth: Our way of life is unsustainable.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Death of democracy

PCI Messenger / March 2018

Major societal transitions are often messy, unpleasant, and full of uncertainty. There’s little doubt left that we, as a society, are in the throes of transition, the cause of which many have pinned on the Trump presidency—and for good reason: it’s messy, unpleasant, and full of uncertainty. But in his recent, in-depth, three-part series, Richard Heinberg argues that Trump is merely a symptom, rather than an instigator, of the destruction of our old systems. Part one considers the true source of system collapse; part two explores a surprising connection between some far left progressives and mainstream conservatives on Russia; and part three considers our best options moving forward as environmental activists. We know there’s no shortage of Trump coverage, but what Richard offers with this piece is a larger perspective, which we hope is actually useful, unlike news about the latest developments in whatever scandal Trump is embroiled in today.

Old age and societal decline

Museletter / Richard Heinberg / February 2018

People grow old and die. Civilizations eventually fail. For centuries amateur philosophers have used the former as a metaphor for the latter, leading to a few useful insights and just as many misleading generalizations. The comparison becomes more immediately interesting as our own civilization stumbles blindly toward collapse. While not the cheeriest of subjects, it’s worth exploring.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

We need a richer picture of the human ‘economy’

Paul Arbair / 17 February 2018

Mainstream economics seems to have learned little and changed nothing in the last decade, despite the fact that the financial crisis and its aftermath laid bare a number of important issues with its theories and models. Failure to address these issues is making the economics discipline increasingly incapable of informing us about the trajectory and situation of our world.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

As climate changes, we need the arts more than ever

Ensia / Richard Heinberg / 01 February 2018

As we move closer to what surely will be unprecedented ecological, economic and social disruption, meaningful art can and must express the turmoil we encounter and help us process it intellectually and emotionally.

In this sense, our need for truly great artists has never been keener.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The Global Risks Report 2018

World Economic Forum / January 2018

Humanity has become remarkably adept at understanding how to mitigate conventional risks that can be relatively easily isolated and managed with standard risk-management approaches. But we are much less competent when it comes to dealing with complex risks in the interconnected systems that underpin our world, such as organizations, economies, societies and the environment. There are signs of strain in many of these systems: our accelerating pace of change is testing the absorptive capacities of institutions, communities and individuals. When risk cascades through a complex system, the danger is not of incremental damage but of “runaway collapse” or an abrupt transition to a new, suboptimal status quo.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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