Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Coping (76)

Telecom networks dealing with ‘unprecedented’ pressure

CBC News / Thomas Daigle / 20 March 2020

Bell spokesperson Nathan Gibson said home internet usage is up to 60 per cent higher than usual during the day and 20 per cent higher at night.

Widespread outages have not been reported, but University of Toronto computer science professor Yashar Ganjali warned “significant changes in typical traffic might lead to unforeseen situations that might lead to temporary disruptions in some services.”

The three main service providers said they’re all increasing their ability to deal with the traffic as usage grows.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Staying sane in the time of coronavirus

Post Carbon Institute / 18 March 2020

PCI Executive Director Asher Miller speaks with licensed psychotherapist Leslie Davenport on how to care for the mental and emotional well-being of ourselves and loved ones as we navigate social isolation and anxiety in the face of COVID-19.

‘Overwhelming and terrifying’: the rise of climate anxiety

The Guardian / Matthew Taylor, Jessica Murray / 10 February 2020

The physical impact of the climate crisis is impossible to ignore, but experts are becoming increasingly concerned about another, less obvious consequence of the escalating emergency – the strain it is putting on people’s mental wellbeing, especially the young.

Psychologists warn that the impact can be debilitating for the growing number of people overwhelmed by the scientific reality of ecological breakdown and for those who have lived through traumatic climate events, often on the climate frontline in the global south.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

In defence of climate change ‘hypocrisy’

CBC News / Brooks DeCillia / 07 November 2019

It’s the go-to criticism incessantly spat at environmentalists: if you produce even a modicum of greenhouse gases, you can’t say anything about climate change […]

But is this really hypocrisy? Philosophers doubt it, calling the criticism a non sequitur that shuts down a crucial debate about climate change. Besides, what’s wrong with being a hypocrite? It may, indeed, be hypocritical to protest oil extraction while also using fossil fuels to power up speakers at a climate change demonstration — but maybe that’s the point.

People who want to change society also live in it.

In the art of argument, a non sequitur doesn’t logically flow from the statement that came before it. It’s a bad argument.

The hypocrisy criticism thrown at climate activists is also an ad hominem or personal attack because it’s directed at the environmentalist (the person) and not their argument about reducing greenhouse gases.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mental health expertise meets sandbags in building resilience

The Energy Mix / 04 December 2019

It was judicious use of mental health expertise, along with many, many sandbags, that enabled Fargo, North Dakota to weather the challenges of the epic 2009 Red River flood.

That was one of the experiences that pointed to a basic precondition for building communities’ ability to face the climate emergency: Recognizing climate change as a profound threat to mental health, responding with messages of “hopeful realism” and ongoing compassion, particularly for older adults and children, and helping communities acquire the psychological and social resilience to cope.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How communities can build psychological resilience to disaster

National Observer / Nicole Westman / 08 November 2019

As climate change makes natural disasters more common and more extreme, cities and communities are working to improve their resilience—their ability to withstand disaster, and bounce back quickly when it occurs. But disasters don’t just cause physical damage; they can leave communities struggling mentally and emotionally, as well. Working to shore up physical structures only tackles part of the problem, says Gerald Galloway, a professor of civil and environmental engineering in the Center for Disaster Resilience at the University of Maryland. “If a community can’t stand on its own two feet psychologically, all the work on having stronger buildings isn’t going to get you anywhere.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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