Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Coping (76)

Experiencing ‘eco-anxiety’?

CBC The Current / 06 April 2017

“Eco-anxiety” has become a short-hand description for symptoms that psychologists are starting to see from Nunavut to Australia and beyond.

That feeling of distress is detailed in a new report by the American Psychological Association that suggests worrying about climate change is having a serious impact on our mental health, and it’s something they say we need to pay a lot more attention to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mental health harmed by global warming

International Business Times / Juliana Rose Pignataro / 30 March 2017

A report released Wednesday by the American Psychological Association, Climate for Health and ecoAmerica detailed how climate change and associated extreme weather events can cause trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and an abundance of other mental health problems.

“The tolls on our mental health are far reaching,” the report stated. “They induce stress, depression and anxiety; strain social and community relationships; and have been linked to increases in aggression, violence and crime.”

Extreme weather events like droughts and floods can cause feelings of hopelessness and helplessness or intense feelings of loss, as does the loss of valuable personal items in such situations, the report noted. Hurricane Katrina was a prime example of how climate can impact mental health. Among people living in areas affected by the storm, suicidal ideation more than doubled, one in six people met the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder and almost half of people developed a mood disorder.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Official trailer: Obselidia

Vimeo / Diane Bell / 2010

Winner of two awards at Sundance and nominated for two Independent Spirit Awards, Diane Bell’s ravishingly beautiful debut feature OBSELIDIA tells the story of lonely George, a man out of step with the 21st century who is writing an encyclopedia of obsolete things. On his quest to catalogue endangered occupations, he meets Sophie, a cinema projectionist at a silent movie theater, and together they journey to the desert of Death Valley to interview a maverick climate scientist who is predicting the eminent end of the world. Part road movie, part love story, OBSELIDIA is an intelligent, thought-provoking bittersweet meditation on loss and how we live with it – given that everything we love is going to end.

Obselidia from rebelheartfilm on Vimeo.

Despair is not a strategy: 15 principles of hope

medium.com / Abby Brockman / 06 March 2017

If you’re out there trying to change your neighborhood, community, city, country, or the world then this is for you. In moments when everything seems hopeless, read this to get your hope on.

1. Hope can co-exist with other feelings. Grief and hope can co-exist. Fear and hope can co-exist. Disappointment and hope can co-exist. Sadness and hope can co-exist. As poet Yehuda Amichai writes, “A man doesn’t have time in his life to have time for everything. He doesn’t have seasons enough to have a season for every purpose. Ecclesiastes was wrong about that. A man needs to love and to hate at the same moment, to laugh and cry with the same eyes, with the same hands to throw stones and to gather them, to make love in war and war in love.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

10 climate-aware parents: talking to kids about global warming

The Tyee / Anna Fahey / 05 January 2017

Nobody wants to frighten their kids. (We know even the most reasonable adults are shut down by fear.) But as the stakes grow more stark and the politics get more divisive, it’s more crucial than ever that we bring the full force of our emotions to this fight and that we raise active, community-minded, and environmentally-aware citizens. And, I believe, talking to our kids is one way to focus all our own difficult and powerful feelings in a way that fuels rather than saps our civic and political engagement.

Think about it: dealing with climate change is about things kids already know well. It’s about cleaning up our messes; about the sun, wind, air, water, and our own bodies; it’s about treating all people with respect and dignity, about stopping bullies; about sharing; and also about making rules that keep us safe — and making sure everyone follows the same rules! Young people are naturally curious, observant, and creative — they can get excited about nature, science, and new ideas.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Is it okay to enjoy the warm winters of climate change?

The Atlantic / Robinson Meyer / 23 February 2017

How much should we really be enjoying weather so unseasonal, so suggestive of the consequences of climate change, when we’re doing so little to combat the larger phenomenon? If we think the future consequences of climate change will be very bad, are we allowed to savor them now?

There is, of course, no single right answer to this query, and it is an ethical or existential concern as much as a scientific one. But when I posed it to the scientists who encounter climate change’s consequences first-hand—in the planet’s expanding deserts, deluged coasts, and bleached coral reefs—they said that it was fine to take the good with the bad when it came to upheavals in Earth’s longterm climate.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 13

The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

 

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.