Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Cooking from scratch (49)

All you need to know to eat good, grass-fed meat

Mother Earth News / June/July 2012 / Deborah Krasner

Beef and other ruminants are generally called “grass-fed,” while pork and poultry are referred to as “pastured” or “free-range.” The essential point is that these animals spend their whole lives eating what they were designed by nature to eat and getting exercise, fresh air and sunlight. They tend to be healthy, with no need for antibiotics or other drugs. Because they range through rotating pastures, they aren’t stressed or crowded. When grass-fed animals are allowed to grow slowly and naturally to the appropriate processing weight, they don’t need growth hormones.

Pastured animals produce manure that enriches the fields they roam on and nourishes birds, promoting a diverse ecosystem. Grass-fed meat and milk are increasingly recognized as healthier and consistently lower in bad fat than industrial products.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Where do you keep your compost bin?

treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 01 December 2017

The location of a compost bin could be affecting your willingness to use it. A group of researchers from the University of British Columbia found that the closer a main collection bin is to one’s door, the more likely one is to use it. While this is a logical and unsurprising conclusion, it’s interesting to see how small the changes have to be in order to make a big difference.

The 10-week study took place in several high-density residential buildings in Vancouver. Compost and recycling bins were placed in three locations — the garbage disposal area (least convenient), at the bottom of the elevator (somewhat convenient), and just outside the doors of individual suites (most convenient).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Fermented oat porridge recipe

Mother Earth News / Sandor Ellix Katz / August 2016

Fermentation can add new dimensions to grain porridges. A 12- to 24-hour soak will increase digestibility and creaminess without altering flavor.

Sally Fallon, author of the pro-fermentation cookbook Nourishing Traditions, is emphatic about soaking grains to make them digestible. “The well-meaning advice of many nutritionists, to consume whole grains as our ancestors did and not refined flours and polished rice, is misleading and often harmful in its consequences; for while our ancestors ate whole grains, they did not consume them as presented in our modern cookbooks in the form of quick-rise breads, granolas, and other hastily prepared casseroles and concoctions. Our ancestors, and virtually all preindustrialized peoples, soaked or fermented their grains before making them into porridge, breads, cakes, and casseroles.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Cast iron cooking workshop

Brockville Museum / 31 August 2017

Join us for our first hands-on workshop as we discover the history and utility of cast iron pans.

  • Learn how to clean and season cast iron pans
  • Bake (and eat) some delicious food prepared in cast iron pans
  • Find out Brockville’s link to cast iron through items in our collection

This is the first in our Heritage Skills Workshop Series. Cost includes all supplies. $15 per session or $36 for the series of 3. Advance registration is required so we can gather supplies. Sign up at the museum in person (Monday-Friday, 10:00 – 5:00) or by phone (613-342-4397)

For more information email us at museum@brockville.com

Veggies n’ Fruit Community Boost Initiative awardees

Healthy Kids Community Challenge Leeds and Grenville / 7 July 2017

Healthy Kids Community Challenge Leeds and Grenville is pleased to announce awardees of the Veggies n’ Fruit Community Boost Initiative. The Veggies n’ Fruit Community Boost Initiative supports the third Healthy Kids Community Challenge theme, Choose to Boost Veggies and Fruit, and aims to create supportive environments for healthy eating.

Thirteen recipients across Leeds and Grenville have introduced programs that will make it easier for kids and families to choose vegetables and fruit with every meal and snack.

Find out what is happening in your community!

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Simple whole-wheat sourdough starter

Mother Earth News / Andrew and Michelle Shall / 04 December 2016

Because I don’t think they sold little pre-measured pouches in those 1800s country stores, I’m confident there was no pellet-yeast hanging out the European bakeries of the Middle Ages, and I’d certainly wager that the Hebrew people, experiencing the first Passover in Egypt so long ago, weren’t just omitting Red Star from their recipes when they were making unleavened bread.

So, a little research taught me that the yeast you can buy in the store (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is a different strain than the “wild” yeast which is used for sourdough (one of them being Saccharomyces exiguus). This wild stuff is everywhere, and as easy to find as breathing, literally. It’s in the air in your home!

For thousands of years, even before microscopes and scientific explanations of fermentation were written, people knew that if you left flour and water dough out for a length of time, something was going on in that dough — and that something could be made into delicious bread.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 9

The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.