Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Composting (11)

Leafy ambitions for fall’s bounty

Trowel Talk / Pat Stachon / September 2019

Autumn is such a beautiful time of year in Eastern Canada that people travel to this area just to enjoy the wonderful sight. As the leaves begin to turn, their colours vary every year depending on our previous summer weather. They can also vary widely from tree to tree and even branch to branch.

Leaves begin to fall any time from the end of August and by November we usually wonder what is to be done with them all?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The greens and browns of your compost

Mother Earth News / Rebecca Louie / March 2018

Compost City (Roost Books, 2015) by Rebecca Louie is a comprehensive and complete guide to creating and using your own compost in a small living space. Louie helps you find ways to work around a tiny space, a busy schedule, and hectic lifestyle to achieve your composting goals. In this excerpt, she discusses the green and browns materials that are good and bad for composting.

Get to know how different browns and greens behave in your system and curate compost ingredients to optimize moisture levels, troubleshoot problems, and af­fect the rate of decomposition.

Knowing the quirks of individual items is particularly helpful if your com­post system has limited space or is in proximity of wary or sensitive neighbors.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The greens and browns of your compost

Mother Earth News / Rebecca Louie / March 2018

Get to know how different browns and greens behave in your system and curate compost ingredients to optimize moisture levels, troubleshoot problems, and af­fect the rate of decomposition.

Knowing the quirks of individual items is particularly helpful if your com­post system has limited space or is in proximity of wary or sensitive neighbors.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Where do you keep your compost bin?

treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 01 December 2017

The location of a compost bin could be affecting your willingness to use it. A group of researchers from the University of British Columbia found that the closer a main collection bin is to one’s door, the more likely one is to use it. While this is a logical and unsurprising conclusion, it’s interesting to see how small the changes have to be in order to make a big difference.

The 10-week study took place in several high-density residential buildings in Vancouver. Compost and recycling bins were placed in three locations — the garbage disposal area (least convenient), at the bottom of the elevator (somewhat convenient), and just outside the doors of individual suites (most convenient).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brockville: Curbside collection of leaves

City of Brockville / 06 October 2016

raking-leavesCurbside collection of leaves will take place on your regular waste collection day during October 17 to October 21 and November 14 to November 18.

Please note that plastic bags are not permitted for leaf collection. To ensure collection, residents must use paper bags or reusable containers only for their leaf waste. Leaves placed in plastic bags will not be collected.

Place leaves at the curb no later than 7:00 a.m. Please ensure that no garbage or brush is included, and that the paper bags or containers weigh less than 22 kg (50 pounds).

Leaves and brush may also be brought to the Gord Watts composting site at 251 North Augusta Road. Compost site hours and rates are on the waste collection calendar, on the City website, or by calling 613-342-8772 ext 8220. Site will close November 25 for the winter season.

A step-by-step guide to vermicomposting

Mother Earth News / Mary Appelhof / July/August 1983

adding worms to compost beddingMy kitchen trash used to smell awful! Coffee grounds, banana peels, lettuce leaves, onion trimmings, orange peels, and plate scrapings all joined with an accumulation of papers, cans, plastic wraps, jars, and bottle caps to produce an unpleasant—and unusable—collection of refuse. Although I emptied the trash can frequently to reduce the odor in the kitchen, I had to hold my breath when I did!

But no longer! I’ve now solved my problem entirely with the help of Eisenia foetida, the common red wiggler (or brandling) worm. That’s right, worms eat my garbage! What’s more, they convert it to black, earthy-smelling, nutrient-rich humus that I use to grow delicious garden vegetables and beautiful houseplants. Operating an indoor worm-powered waste converter is easy, convenient, environmentally sound, and inexpensive. It’s fun, too. Anyone can do it, and here’s how.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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