Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community gardens (84)

Growing edibles in containers

The Edible Garden / Dale Odorizzi / March 2018

You want to grow edibles but you do not have any yard in which to grow them. Are you doomed to just getting your fresh vegetables from the road side stands or farmers markets? While these are both wonderful alternatives, the answer is you can grow your own vegetables in containers on your patio or balcony. In our February 2018 issue of the Edible Garden we discussed the importance of pot size and soil types necessary to grow plants in containers. In this issue, we finally talk about the plants.

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BPL launches new Seed Library

Brockville Public Library / 20 February 2018

Sprouting from Seedy Saturday, the Seed Library will offer free fruit, vegetable, herb and flower seeds for anyone to plant in their own gardens. Participants are encouraged to harvest seeds and return them to the library in the fall. The Library also has growing guides and garden books to help new gardeners and budding green thumbs.

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Seedy Saturday 2018

Transition Brockville / Brockville Public Library

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Companion planting with vegetables and flowers

Mother Earth News / Barbara Pleasant / April/May 2011

The idea of “companion planting” has been around for thousands of years, during which time it has become so besmirched with bad science and metaphysics that many gardeners aren’t sure what it means. The current definition goes something like this: Companion planting is the establishment of two or more species in close proximity so that some cultural benefit, such as pest control or increased yield, may be achieved.

Historically, North American and European gardeners have based many of their attempts with companion planting on widely published charts, which were mostly derived from funky chemistry experiments using plant extracts in the 1930s. But it turns out many of the plant partnerships listed in these “traditional” companion-planting charts don’t actually work well. Reaping the benefits of companion planting is possible, though, as long as you look to time-tested crop combinations.

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Feature documentary: Symphony of the Soil

Transition Brockville / 14 February 2018

Filmed on four continents, featuring esteemed scientists and working farmers and ranchers, Symphony of the Soil is an intriguing presentation that highlights possibilities of healthy soil creating healthy plants creating healthy humans living on a healthy planet.

Mark’s ten seedling tips

West Coast Seeds / Mark Macdonald / 22 February 2017

You’ve selected your seeds, you’ve invested in unfamiliar seed starting equipment, you’ve planted the seeds — and now the damn things are coming up! What to do?!

Lesson One: Take it easy. Remember that seeds are just like any other embryo, and that their parents have bestowed upon them a supply of food to get them started. As seeds germinate, they use this food to unfurl their first leaf/leaves, and to pop out a tiny, rudimentary root with which to take in water and nutrients. As those first leaves unfurl, the plants will begin taking energy from the sun through photosynthesis. My approach is to lay off all fertilizers until it’s time to transplant them into their permanent growing spots. Seedlings just don’t need a lot of food. They need bright light and a steady, but moderate supply of water.

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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