Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community gardens (102)

Planting with preserving in mind

Mother Earth News / Mary Moss-Sprague / 28 February 2013

In order to have enough stores to last through the next winter, one must know the quantity of product that will be needed.

The possibilities are mouth-watering and tempting. Tomatoes, apples, string beans, carrots, peas, okra, parsnips, rutabagas, turnips, berries, pears, cherries, apricots, peaches, plums, pickling cucumbers, grapes, greens, beets, garlic, onions, potatoes, asparagus, peppers, herbs, squash, and other items all lend themselves well to canning, drying or freezing. Some methods work better for certain items than others. In this instance, we will focus on vegetables designated for canning, and the quantities to plan on growing for “putting up the harvest.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seedy Saturday growing bigger and bigger

Recorder & Times / Jonathon Brodie / 13 March 2017

The Seedy Saturday Free Seed Exchange is finding its roots in Brockville.

The third edition of the event took place Saturday and already it has shown considerable growth, moving from its former home at the city library and into the Memorial Centre hall this year.

On top of the garden clubs that have always been involved in the event, organizers chose to listen to last year’s feedback and expand by bringing in vendors as well.

Five local vendors, ranging from honeymakers to a business that makes dog treats, set up for the event and helped fill the larger space.

The addition appears to have worked out as it was estimated a couple hundred people checked out Seedy Saturday, to give the event its highest attendance.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seedy Saturday is bigger and better than ever this year

Transition Brockville, Brockville Public Library

The Brockville Public Library and Transition Brockville will be hosting the 3rd annual Seedy Saturday free seed swap on Saturday, March 11, from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Brockville Memorial Centre, 100 Magedoma Blvd.

Seed savers and garden lovers are invited to swap and share seeds, and meet and share experiences with local gardeners. Our Seedy Saturday will also feature free planting activities for kids, as well as a seed sprouting demonstration. This year Seedy Saturday is expanding to include special guest speakers on improving your soil (Dave Alguire, 10:30) and starting your own seeds indoors (Jeremy Dutton, 11:00), as well as displays by local food and garden vendors.

Everyone is welcome to attend and pick up free seeds.

If you would like to register and bring your own labeled vegetable and flower seeds to swap, or for more information about Seedy Saturday, please contact Brandy at the library, 613-342-3936 or brandy@brockvillelibrary.ca, or Chris Stesky with Transition Brockville, cstesky@xplornet.com.

The Garden Planting Calendar

Internet Scout / 10 February 2017 – Volume 23, Number 6

Anyone who has planted a vegetable garden knows that the ideal time to plant can vary widely by geographic location. The National Gardening Association has created this tool, the Garden Planting Calendar, to help. Simply type in a select zipcode, landmark, or city to access a handy chart of when and how to plant all varieties of vegetables. Selecting a specific crop pulls of detailed information and images. Readers will also find information about when to start sowing vegetables and when to (if necessary) transplant vegetables from indoor to outdoor gardens. In addition to this chart, visitors can check out quick planting strategies for both the fall and the spring. This website will appeal to new gardeners as well as experienced gardeners in new cities. [MMB]

[ GARDEN PLANTING CALENDAR ]  [ SOURCE ]

How people can truly take back control: from the bottom up

The Guardian / George Monbiot / 08 February 2017

There are hundreds of examples of how this might begin, such as community shops, development trusts, food assemblies (communities buying fresh food directly from local producers), community choirs and free universities (in which people exchange knowledge and skills in social spaces). Also time banking (where neighbours give their time to give practical help and support to others), transition towns (where residents try to create more sustainable economies), potluck lunch clubs (in which everyone brings a homemade dish to share), local currencies, Men’s Sheds (in which older men swap skills and escape from loneliness), turning streets into temporary playgrounds (like the Playing Out project), secular services (such as Sunday Assembly), lantern festivals, fun palaces and technology hubs.

Turning such initiatives into a wider social revival means creating what practitioners call “thick networks”: projects that proliferate, spawning further ventures and ideas that weren’t envisaged when they started. They then begin to develop a dense, participatory culture that becomes attractive and relevant to everyone rather than mostly to socially active people with time on their hands.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

6 ways to grow food year round in any climate

Mother Earth News / Destiny Hagest / 19 December 2016

How do we make it so even people in hardiness Zones 5 and below can realistically (without tons of electrical input or expense) grow enough food to sustain themselves year round?

Solutions abound — it’s more than possible, no matter where you are, to take control of your food again, and bring your supermarket home. Here are some simply brilliant solutions to challenging climates, so that everyone, everywhere, can start producing their own food.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
TB Projects

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