Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community gardens (105)

The Garden Planting Calendar

Internet Scout / 10 February 2017 – Volume 23, Number 6

Anyone who has planted a vegetable garden knows that the ideal time to plant can vary widely by geographic location. The National Gardening Association has created this tool, the Garden Planting Calendar, to help. Simply type in a select zipcode, landmark, or city to access a handy chart of when and how to plant all varieties of vegetables. Selecting a specific crop pulls of detailed information and images. Readers will also find information about when to start sowing vegetables and when to (if necessary) transplant vegetables from indoor to outdoor gardens. In addition to this chart, visitors can check out quick planting strategies for both the fall and the spring. This website will appeal to new gardeners as well as experienced gardeners in new cities. [MMB]

[ GARDEN PLANTING CALENDAR ]  [ SOURCE ]

How people can truly take back control: from the bottom up

The Guardian / George Monbiot / 08 February 2017

There are hundreds of examples of how this might begin, such as community shops, development trusts, food assemblies (communities buying fresh food directly from local producers), community choirs and free universities (in which people exchange knowledge and skills in social spaces). Also time banking (where neighbours give their time to give practical help and support to others), transition towns (where residents try to create more sustainable economies), potluck lunch clubs (in which everyone brings a homemade dish to share), local currencies, Men’s Sheds (in which older men swap skills and escape from loneliness), turning streets into temporary playgrounds (like the Playing Out project), secular services (such as Sunday Assembly), lantern festivals, fun palaces and technology hubs.

Turning such initiatives into a wider social revival means creating what practitioners call “thick networks”: projects that proliferate, spawning further ventures and ideas that weren’t envisaged when they started. They then begin to develop a dense, participatory culture that becomes attractive and relevant to everyone rather than mostly to socially active people with time on their hands.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

6 ways to grow food year round in any climate

Mother Earth News / Destiny Hagest / 19 December 2016

How do we make it so even people in hardiness Zones 5 and below can realistically (without tons of electrical input or expense) grow enough food to sustain themselves year round?

Solutions abound — it’s more than possible, no matter where you are, to take control of your food again, and bring your supermarket home. Here are some simply brilliant solutions to challenging climates, so that everyone, everywhere, can start producing their own food.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Farming the neighborhood

Mother Earth News / Kristi Quillen, K.C. Compton / December 2016/January 2017

Sarah, her husband, Jeremiah, and their four daughters turned their lawn into garden and began growing their own food as a solution to the family’s health concerns and the cost of organic vegetables — and they achieved a lot at their 1⁄5-acre backyard homestead in Loveland, Colorado. In fact, they were among MOTHER’s 2014 Homesteaders of the Year. Eventually, though, they began to run out of space and dreamed of expanding, but couldn’t afford to buy a big piece of land.

“I was looking longingly at farms because of the space, but we love living in our neighborhood that’s so close to downtown,” Sarah says.

Then she had an idea: Why not farm the neighborhood?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

All about garden seeds

Mother Earth News / Cindy Conner / August 201

The mission statement of Seed Libraries (New Society Publishers, 2014) by Cindy Conner is to introduce a movement that keeps seeds in the hands of the people while revitalizing public libraries and communities. Seed libraries preserve and protect the genetic diversity of a harvest by keeping the seeds in the community. The members of the seed library will bring their own seeds back to the library to share with the rest of the members.

Seeds are basic to life. They have the potential to not only grow into food, flowers, bushes, and trees, but to reproduce themselves abundantly. Some cultures hold them sacred, as all cultures should. If we don’t value our seeds, we don’t value all of life surrounding us. Seeds connect us with our past and with our future.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Looking and working towards the future

Food Matters Coalition / 29 November 2016

PrintBased on your April 2016 Conversation about Food Matters community input we will be focusing on the following broad directions:

  • Support to our members and partners in their work to increase the population’s food literacy including food skills – both in the schools and in the community. This can include supporting existing initiatives, sharing information, and learning about the various models of community food hubs.
  • Advocating for and working towards a strong community garden network – defining community as it may be appropriate – municipal land, private land, at schools, community areas, communal living spaces, etc.
  • Doing what we can to advocate for and support our members and partners who work towards decreasing food insecurity through decreasing poverty.

To more clearly define our work for the next 12 months we need to know who is interested in being actively involved so we can be sure to take on only what we can realistically handle. If you, or a representative from your agency or group, or someone else you know would like be actively involved with the Food Matters Coalition Steering Committee, please let us know by January 13, 2017.

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

 

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