Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community gardens (80)

Frontenac Co. seed companies: And then there were three

NFU Local 316 / Newsletter / 18 March 218

A new partnership of three experienced seed producers (Kathy Rothermel, Frank Misek and Annie Richard), Kitchen Table Seed House offers certified organic herb, flower and vegetable seeds grown on Wolfe Island. With Kathy’s market garden experience, Frank’s culinary expertise and Annie’s plant breeding interests, Kitchen Table seeds will be “putting flavour on the table”. Their seeds will be available at Riley’s in Kingston, Sun Harvest in Glenburnie, Schell’s in Bath, Fargo’s on Wolfe Island, Burt’s Greenhouses in Wilton, and Willows Agriservice in Harrowsmith. For more information, go to or contact them at or 613-385-8569.

Kitchen Table Seed House joins two other local seed companies in Frontenac County. [ more… ]

Make the best seed starting and potting mix

GrowVeg / 23 February 2018

Seed starting mixes are essential for sowing many vegetables, herbs and flowers. But with so much to sow over the coming weeks and months, they can be expensive – unless you make your own.

Growing edibles in containers

The Edible Garden / Dale Odorizzi / March 2018

You want to grow edibles but you do not have any yard in which to grow them. Are you doomed to just getting your fresh vegetables from the road side stands or farmers markets? While these are both wonderful alternatives, the answer is you can grow your own vegetables in containers on your patio or balcony. In our February 2018 issue of the Edible Garden we discussed the importance of pot size and soil types necessary to grow plants in containers. In this issue, we finally talk about the plants.


BPL launches new Seed Library

Brockville Public Library / 20 February 2018

Sprouting from Seedy Saturday, the Seed Library will offer free fruit, vegetable, herb and flower seeds for anyone to plant in their own gardens. Participants are encouraged to harvest seeds and return them to the library in the fall. The Library also has growing guides and garden books to help new gardeners and budding green thumbs.


Seedy Saturday 2018

Transition Brockville / Brockville Public Library

[ more… ]

Companion planting with vegetables and flowers

Mother Earth News / Barbara Pleasant / April/May 2011

The idea of “companion planting” has been around for thousands of years, during which time it has become so besmirched with bad science and metaphysics that many gardeners aren’t sure what it means. The current definition goes something like this: Companion planting is the establishment of two or more species in close proximity so that some cultural benefit, such as pest control or increased yield, may be achieved.

Historically, North American and European gardeners have based many of their attempts with companion planting on widely published charts, which were mostly derived from funky chemistry experiments using plant extracts in the 1930s. But it turns out many of the plant partnerships listed in these “traditional” companion-planting charts don’t actually work well. Reaping the benefits of companion planting is possible, though, as long as you look to time-tested crop combinations.


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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

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