Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community building (61)

Small businesses can save your community

Strong Towns / Quint Studer / 31 July 2018

Over the past few decades, most communities have had their “pillars” pulled out from under them. Big institutions like banks, hospitals, and newspapers used to be locally owned. Their owners lived and worked in the same place. Their children went to the local schools. As a consequence, their leaders were deeply invested in the community and worked hard to keep it vibrant.

But over the years, large corporations have bought up many of these pillar institutions and consolidated them. It’s now common for the owners of these organizations to live elsewhere, often in bigger cities where corporate headquarters are located. Smaller communities no longer have the benefit of business leaders with a deep personal connection to the place.

This is a natural part of change. And all change brings opportunities along with losses.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Changemakers: Embracing hope, taking action …

New Society Publishers

With every news report, the world seems to be careening off the rails. It’s all too easy to slip into despair waiting for co-opted, self-serving governments to act.

The antidote to fear and despair is hope and action. We each hold the power to make personal changes that can drive local changes and cascade into large-scale social transformation.

This is the guidebook for ordinary people who want to create a new society now. The first section explores the idea of transformative change — what it is, what difference it makes, and how it is connected to learning.

The second section explores powerful new stories of everyday people who have challenged traditional understandings of food, shelter, energy, transportation, waste, and economics, and transformed aspects of their lives, their communities, and wider society.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Communities in Bloom Blog #3: Criteria for Judging

Brockville CiB Committee / 23 June 2018

Lots of people who read “Communities in Bloom” think that it is an assessment of how “pretty” each community is, but very few people understand just what Communities in Bloom is, and why it is so important to communities like ours across the country. Luckily for them, the Communities in Bloom Brockville committee is here to shed more light on the competition, and educate our citizens on the perks of being a part of this great program.

As stated in the first edition of the Communities in Bloom blog, the evaluation of each community is split up into six sectors. These sectors include: Environmental Action, Floral Displays, Heritage Conservation, Landscaped Areas, Tidiness, and Urban Forestry & Trails. Each of these sectors is further broken down into Municipal, Business & Institutional, Residential, and Community Involvement to help the judges fairly evaluate each aspect of the community. Each of the main sectors has specific requirements or measurables due to the differences from category to category. In this week’s blog, we’re going to break them all down. Enjoy!

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Plenty of plans for waterfront

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 15 June 2018

As demand for boating slips grows, the city may one day relocate the Brockville Rowing Club to St. Lawrence Park to make room for a marina expansion.

While that idea is nowhere close to the planning stages now, it could be among the more controversial proposals being floated before the public at a special waterfront open house meeting Monday.

Brockville’s waterfront ad hoc committee, which has been developing a “Waterfront Action Plan” for the city’s waterfront and shoreline, is inviting members of the public to the open house, where they can take in the various proposals in storyboard format between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Memorial Centre community hall.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The repair cafes waging war on throwaway culture

The Guardian / Kate Lyons / 15 March 2018

A vacuum cleaner, a hair straightener, a laptop, Christmas lights, an e-reader, a blender, a kettle, two bags, a pair of jeans, a remote-control helicopter, a spoon, a dining-room chair, a lamp and hair clippers. All broken.

It sounds like a pile of things that you’d stick in boxes and take to the tip. In fact, it’s a list of things mended in a single afternoon by British volunteers determined to get people to stop throwing stuff away.

This is the Reading Repair Cafe, part of a burgeoning international network aimed at confronting a world of stuff, of white goods littering dumps in west Africa and trash swilling through the oceans in huge gyres.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Reopening the penitentiary farms

Save Our Prison Farms committee / Dianne Dowling / 27 February 2018

Yahoooo! Today’s budget included a paragraph about the prison farms:

Reopening the Penitentiary Farms at Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions

To provide federal inmates with training opportunities to acquire new skills, while preparing for employment and successful reintegration and rehabilitation into the community, the Government proposes to invest $4.3 million over five years, beginning and 2018–19, to support the reopening of the Penitentiary Farms at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions in Kingston, Ontario. The farms would be run by CORCAN, a key rehabilitation programming agency of the Correctional Service of Canada.

from page 210 of the budget at https://www.scribd.com/document/372565383/Federal-Budget-2018#from_embed

The CSC prison farm advisory panel has a meeting next week, and I am hoping we will have more details from the Minister of Public Safety and CSC about what the farms will include.

Suggested action:

Please consider writing a letter or making a phone call of support and appreciation to any of the following: the Minister of Public Safety, the Prime Minister, other Cabinet ministers, any MP of your choice, a media outlet, etc. Supporting the decision to fund the restoration of the farms will assist in maintaining the government’s endorsement of the program, and, we hope, lead to additional funding in the future.

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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