Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community building (57)

The repair cafes waging war on throwaway culture

The Guardian / Kate Lyons / 15 March 2018

A vacuum cleaner, a hair straightener, a laptop, Christmas lights, an e-reader, a blender, a kettle, two bags, a pair of jeans, a remote-control helicopter, a spoon, a dining-room chair, a lamp and hair clippers. All broken.

It sounds like a pile of things that you’d stick in boxes and take to the tip. In fact, it’s a list of things mended in a single afternoon by British volunteers determined to get people to stop throwing stuff away.

This is the Reading Repair Cafe, part of a burgeoning international network aimed at confronting a world of stuff, of white goods littering dumps in west Africa and trash swilling through the oceans in huge gyres.


Reopening the penitentiary farms

Save Our Prison Farms committee / Dianne Dowling / 27 February 2018

Yahoooo! Today’s budget included a paragraph about the prison farms:

Reopening the Penitentiary Farms at Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions

To provide federal inmates with training opportunities to acquire new skills, while preparing for employment and successful reintegration and rehabilitation into the community, the Government proposes to invest $4.3 million over five years, beginning and 2018–19, to support the reopening of the Penitentiary Farms at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions in Kingston, Ontario. The farms would be run by CORCAN, a key rehabilitation programming agency of the Correctional Service of Canada.

from page 210 of the budget at

The CSC prison farm advisory panel has a meeting next week, and I am hoping we will have more details from the Minister of Public Safety and CSC about what the farms will include.

Suggested action:

Please consider writing a letter or making a phone call of support and appreciation to any of the following: the Minister of Public Safety, the Prime Minister, other Cabinet ministers, any MP of your choice, a media outlet, etc. Supporting the decision to fund the restoration of the farms will assist in maintaining the government’s endorsement of the program, and, we hope, lead to additional funding in the future.

Coworking in Smiths Falls – Meraki Collective

The Meraki Collective

Meraki Collective was founded with a rebellious spirit and a lofty objective: to bring together entrepreneurs, innovators, leaders and creatives to co-create a community which lives at the intersection of health, wealth, and happiness in Smiths Falls, all while leading the way for other like-minded, community driven small towns in Canada and beyond.

We are an active, creative, and sustainable tribe of remote (work-from-home) professionals, consultants, freelance artists, entrepreneurs, and small businesses/start-ups, working in a shared environment for the purposes of productivity, innovation and some collaboration.


Township buys Kemptville College for sustainability hub

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 08 November 2017

North Grenville has reached a deal to buy the former Kemptville College campus from the provincial government. The agreement in principle announced Wednesday would see the municipality assume ownership of most of the 633-acre campus with more than 50 buildings to transform it into an “education and community hub.”

“The is great news,” said North Grenville Mayor Dave Gordon. “For starters it brings back North Grenville College to the residents of North Grenville. It gives us the opportunity to create an economic hub for the North Grenville area.”

Brian Carre, chief executive officer of North Grenville, said the municipality will own the land and the buildings but a not-for-profit group will run the hub.

Carre said the hub will focus on such green initiatives as climate-change adaptation, low carbon studies and agriculture resiliency. […] As an example, Carre cited an agency that works with post-traumatic stress disorder patients through gardening therapy. The gardening program would dovetail well with the hub’s environmental focus.


The Community Resilience Reader

Post Carbon Institute / 05 October 2017

The Community Resilience Reader offers a new vision for creating resilience through essays by leaders in varied fields including science, policy, community building, and urban design. It describes the environmental, economic, energy, and equity challenges we face, the essential tools of resilience science, and the wisdom of activists, scholars, and analysts working with community issues on the ground. The result is a holistic, accessible book that will inspire readers and provide them with the tools for creating resilience at the community level.

We are so excited about this new project and enjoyed the incredible opportunity to work with inspirational experts on a variety of topics including:

  • Six Foundations for Building Community Resilience
  • The Needs of Humanity Versus the Limits of the Planet
  • The Limits of 20th Century Economics and Growth
  • The True Costs of Extractive Capitalism
  • Does Human Nature Drive Us Toward Collapse?
  • Systems Literacy: A Toolkit for Purposeful Change
  • Pulling It All Together: Resilience, Wisdom, and Beloved Community
  • Building Community Resilience at the Water’s Edge
  • Beyond Waste: Sustainable Consumption for Community Resilience


Community Hub hosted Healthy Kids Community challenge

HometownTV12 / Dale Elliot / 22 May 2017

Children from the Community Hub participated in the Healthy Kids Community Challenge (HKCC) on Friday afternoon on Blockhouse Island.

The challenge was held to promote the new water bottle filling station in the James C Auld building on Blockhouse Island and to promote and generate awareness for a healthy lifestyle for children by using the new water bottle filling station. The HKCC target audience is children 0-12 years of age.

The kids participated in various stations encouraging physical activities, received a free re-usable water bottle and at the end of the event talked over safety tips.


«page 1 of 10

The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?


View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Area Community Gardens