Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Community building (75)

House of Lazarus in Mountain seeks satellite storefront

Kemptville Advance / 12 November 2019

House of Lazarus (HOL) is looking for a partner with retail space to help the mission expand its reach.

Currently, HOL’s main headquarters — including its food bank, two stores and warehouse — is situated in Mountain, at the very top west portion of North Dundas, right next door to North Grenville. Food bank clients, thrift store shoppers and donors come from far and wide, making HOL a household name throughout a good portion of eastern Ontario. The mission is funded primarily through revenue from store sales, with donations and grants helping to fill in the gaps.

“If you have store front space sitting idle and you’re interested in partnering with us, we can pay a reasonable rent or provide a charitable tax receipt in lieu of rent,” HOL executive director Cathy Ashby said.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Active Transportation Plan – Draft – September 2019

Active Brockville / 27 September 2019

The draft of Brockville’s Active Transportation Plan goes to committee of Council on Tuesday, following which there will be a period for public review, and then a further Council meeting to consider ratification.

Download the (large) plan PDF document here: http://bit.ly/XBR-AT1

CCVS helps plant trees outside Cornwall Public Library

Cornwall Newswatch / 25 September 2019

On this National Tree Day, a group of students from Cornwall Collegiate and Vocational School (CCVS) planted trees outside the Cornwall Public Library.

The project is a partnership between the high school and the Tree Action Working Group of Transition Cornwall+ with supervision from the City of Cornwall’s parks department.

The 14 students from grades 7-12 are part of the school’s Tiny Forest initiative. They planted six trees – four sumac and two crab apples – along the east side of the building next to Sydney Street, north of Second Street East.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Introducing: Sustainable Merrickville-Wolford

Sustainable Merrickville-Wolford / 14 September 2019

We invite anyone interested to join us in working together to take positive action in the face of the climate crisis. No judgement, no guilt, no shaming – we need all our efforts, however imperfect. Let’s come together to learn, build community resilience and regenerate our planet.

We will aim to host a monthly potluck event where we share a meal and pursue practical learning and action on themes of interest. We will select topics that help us all to address the climate crisis, exploring how we can help at home and in the community to regenerate our environment and transition to a new green energy economy.

We will also network online, sharing ways to contribute to various initiatives and action beyond our community.

No memberships, no commitments, join us when you can, take up tasks of interest. New faces always welcome!

[ FACEBOOK PAGE ]

Sudbury’s food forests thriving

Sudbury Star / Mary Katherine Keown / 13 September 2019

Part of the food forest at Delki Dozzi. The food forest is designed to resemble a forest ecosystem and requires no watering after a couple of years. There are several kinds of flowers in the forest to attract pollinators. Mary Katherine Keown/The Sudbury Star
“I think it’s doing great,” Carrie Regenstreif, executive director of Sudbury Shared Harvest, said. “Way better than I expected – I was honestly a little skeptical. When you saw it the first year and there’s just a bunch of plants with woodchips around them, you don’t really believe it’s going to fill in like this.”

The 8,000-square-foot forest is open to the public and Regenstreif said nearly every time she visits, she sees someone harvesting.

The forest contains several types of apple, cherry and plum trees; Saskatoon berries; ever-bearing strawberries, which produce fruit until the frost hits; gooseberries; haskaps; sea buckthorn; asparagus, which will be ready in 2020; rhubarb; currants; and three varieties of raspberries, in addition to other species. Everything in the forest is drought-resistant. In fact, the food forest is designed not to require watering after the first two years.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Guide to urban homesteading

Mother Earth News / Rachel Kaplan / April/May 2014

If you live in a city and dream of someday being able to work the land and become a modern homesteader, consider this: There’s no need to wait — you can easily do many homesteading activities in the city. You may not have enough garden space to grow your own wheat or corn, but you can harvest an amazing amount of many crops from a collection of containers. Owning your own milk cow is likely not an option, but keeping backyard chickens certainly is. Plus, in the city, it can be much easier to build a community of like-minded neighbors who can share tools, knowledge and friendship.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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