Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Canada (112)

Your lifestyle is making blue box recycling unsustainable

CBC News / Emily Chung / 27 March 2018

Our changing lifestyles over the past few decades have dramatically altered the types of materials we put in blue bins.

And that’s led to flatlining recycling rates and ballooning costs for municipalities across Canada that are struggling to cope with the changes.

“It’s a really a perfect storm of crazy stuff going on that means that the blue box has huge challenges that it did not have 10 years ago,” says Maria Kelleher, principal of Toronto-based Kelleher Environmental, a consulting firm specializing in waste reduction and recycling research, strategy and program design.

The problem is that we’re now throwing out a huge variety of new types of packaging — mostly plastics, sometimes glued to other materials like metals — that recycling programs were never meant to deal with. Meanwhile, the materials that they were designed to collect, sort and resell make up a shrinking proportion of what comes in.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Power utilities forced to adapt to wilder weather

CBC News / 15 March 2018

The increasing intensity of storms that lead to massive power outages highlights the need for Canada’s electrical utilities to be more robust and innovative, climate change scientists say.

“We need to plan to be more resilient in the face of the increasing chances of these events occurring,” University of New Brunswick climate change scientist Louise Comeau said in a recent interview.

The East Coast was walloped this week by the third storm in as many days, with high winds toppling trees and even part of a Halifax church steeple. Nova Scotia Power says it has weathered nine storm days so far this year — up from four in the same period last year.

Significant weather events have consistently increased over the last five years, according to the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA), which has tracked such events since 2003.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Western Canada’s risk of water shortages rising

CBC News / Erin Collins / 14 March 2018

It’s a situation that, if prolonged, could lead to the kind of water shortages being seen in Cape Town and parts of California in recent years.

“That kind of extreme water shortage hasn’t happened here, but it’s not impossible that it can,” he says, noting that the shortages facing Cape Town today were once unimaginable.

Glaciers are also an important part of the equation, and receding ice sheets are affecting annual water cycles in the West.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Some good news about Canada’s 2020 climate target

National Observer / Barry Saxifrage / 06 March 2018

Remember our 2020 climate target? Turns out, the overwhelming majority of Canadians are close to reaching it, but our progress has been wiped out by oilsands pollution.

Back in 2009, Stephen Harper flew to Copenhagen and pledged that Canada would reduce climate pollution by 2020.

And (almost) all of us did.

As my first chart shows, the vast majority of Canada has reduced climate pollution roughly in line with our pledge. You can see this in the falling black line on the chart.

This national super-majority is made up of provinces and territories that are home to 85 per cent of Canadians.

Sadly, there’s a catch….

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Big step forward on agricultural pesticides in Quebec

CAPE / Randall McQuaker, Kim Perrotta / 07 March 2018

On February 19th, the Quebec Minister for Sustainable Development announced a new law for pesticides which represents a huge leap forward for provincial laws in Canada. It includes a ban on five pesticides that are commonly used in the agricultural sector – three neonicotinoid pesticides (neonics), atrazine and chlorpyrifos. Neonics are harmful to bees and many other living organisms in the ecosystem, chlorpyrifos was recently named a “toxicant” to children’s development by the State of California, and atrazine has been banned in Europe for more than a decade.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Reopening the penitentiary farms

Save Our Prison Farms committee / Dianne Dowling / 27 February 2018

Yahoooo! Today’s budget included a paragraph about the prison farms:

Reopening the Penitentiary Farms at Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions

To provide federal inmates with training opportunities to acquire new skills, while preparing for employment and successful reintegration and rehabilitation into the community, the Government proposes to invest $4.3 million over five years, beginning and 2018–19, to support the reopening of the Penitentiary Farms at the Joyceville and Collins Bay Institutions in Kingston, Ontario. The farms would be run by CORCAN, a key rehabilitation programming agency of the Correctional Service of Canada.

from page 210 of the budget at https://www.scribd.com/document/372565383/Federal-Budget-2018#from_embed

The CSC prison farm advisory panel has a meeting next week, and I am hoping we will have more details from the Minister of Public Safety and CSC about what the farms will include.

Suggested action:

Please consider writing a letter or making a phone call of support and appreciation to any of the following: the Minister of Public Safety, the Prime Minister, other Cabinet ministers, any MP of your choice, a media outlet, etc. Supporting the decision to fund the restoration of the farms will assist in maintaining the government’s endorsement of the program, and, we hope, lead to additional funding in the future.

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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