Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Canada (130)

Methane gas delay a ‘real blow’ to Canada’s targets

The Star / Alex Ballingall / 21 April 2017

The Liberal government’s decision to delay its new methane gas regulations by three years is being attacked by environmental activists as a blow to Canada’s climate commitments and a possible capitulation to the oil industry.

Dale Marshall, national program manager with Environmental Defence, told the Star that curbing methane gas is one of the easiest ways to reduce emissions that cause climate change. The fact that the government is putting off action on this low-hanging fruit in the climate fight demonstrates a “total” lack of leadership, Marshall said.

“This is really discouraging, because this is the easy stuff. It’s the only thing that’s targeting the oil and gas industry, and they’re backing off on it,” he said, arguing that the move suggests Ottawa was swayed by industry stakeholders to put off the regulations.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

To the Ends of the Earth

TVO / 23 January 2017

Narrated by Emma Thompson, this documentary examines the rise of extreme energy extraction in Canada and its impact on the environment, economy and local communities. The fossil fuel industry’s intensive hunt for unconventional non-renewables, including Arctic drilling and shale gas fracking, also gives rise to a formidable array of scientists, authors and activists who envision a post-growth economic future premised on co-operation, social justice and ecological stewardship.

Local planning, sharing benefits key to wind-farm buy-in

CBC News / 05 March 2017

Involving community members in wind-farm planning and ensuring nearby residents benefit from turbines would go a long way toward winning local buy-in for such projects, a new Canadian study concludes.

The study, published in a recent edition of the Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, notes that fast-paced development and limits on local decision-making have resulted in strong opposition to wind projects. Those objections can be mitigated by the fair distribution of area benefits, the authors write.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How much does it really cost to charge that electric vehicle?

autoTrader.ca / Evan Williams / 02 March 2017

Just about every article or news piece about an electric car that we do – and there is a lot of EV news lately – gets a comment thread filled with people debating the price of charging an EV. “Hydro rates are so high”, “maybe when electricity is cheaper”, “who can afford to drive one when I can use cheaper gas”, and best of all “filling a tank with fuel is half the price of plugging in a car.”

What we realized is that buyers don’t seem to know just how much it costs to charge an EV. I realized that I didn’t know how much it would cost to charge an EV either. But I wanted to find out. We all know exactly how much it costs to put gas in the tank – look at the lines if there is a one cent jump expected tomorrow – but electricity is more stable and more predictable. So how much does it cost to “fill up” an electric car?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Study shows massive global permafrost melt underway

Common Dreams / Nika Knight / 01 March 2017

The study in northwest Canada mapped approximately half a million square miles of tundra and found that 52,000 square miles—an area the size of Alabama—is affected by the decay of permafrost, InsideClimate News’s Bob Berwyn reported Tuesday. The collapse of permafrost is “intensifying,” the researchers observed in the study published in Geology in early February, and it’s sending enormous landslides into lakes and rivers that are capable of choking off life downstream.

“Similar signs are evident in coastal Arctic areas, where thawing permafrost and bigger waves are taking 60- to 70-foot bites of land each year,” Berwyn wrote.

“Scientists estimate that the world’s permafrost holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere,” Berwyn noted. Indeed, the swift decline of permafrost is poised to rapidly accelerate global warming, as Common Dreams has reported.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change

UCI News / 14 February 2017

Ice loss from Canada’s Arctic glaciers has transformed them into a major contributor to sea level change, new research by University of California, Irvine glaciologists has found.

From 2005 to 2015, surface melt off ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands grew by an astonishing 900 percent, from an average of three gigatons to 30 gigatons per year, according to results published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

“In the past decade, as air temperatures have warmed, surface melt has increased dramatically,” said lead author Romain Millan, an Earth system science doctoral student.

The team found that in the past decade, overall ice mass declined markedly, turning the region into a major contributor to sea level change. Canada holds 25 percent of all Arctic ice, second only to Greenland.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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