Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Canada (117)

Energy and GHG Management E-Learning

Natural Resource Canada / Heads Up: Building Energy Efficiency / Vol 5, Issue 9

NRCan’s Greening Government Services (NRCan-GGS) recently published its first Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) Management e-training modules on NRCan YouTube! In an effort to assist federal clients achieve the ambitious targets set under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and the Greening Government Strategy. NRCan-GGS is proud to announce the first of a series of e-learning courses, now available on NRCan YouTube. These e-learning modules will help you better understand and manage the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of your buildings.

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Flipping Canada’s carbon price debate

National Post / John Ivison / 19 September 2018

The Liberals’ Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act requires Ottawa to return tax revenue to the province where it was raised in cases where it has imposed a “backstop” carbon tax in the absence of a recognized provincial climate plan. Trudeau has indicated that, rather than sending a rebate to the governments of those provinces, he may choose to send the money directly to its households.

Research by environmental economist Dave Sawyer of EnviroEconomics suggests that in this scenario most households, regardless of income level, would receive more money from the federal government than they would pay in carbon taxes.

The Conservatives have long railed against the Liberals’ “tax on everything” but the study of three provinces suggests those households — particularly at the lower end of the income spectrum — would end up better off. The amount they receive would rise over time in line with the direct carbon tax, which will start at $20-per-tonne next January and rise to $50-a-tonne in 2022.

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Summer of fire, heat and flood puts a focus on adaptation

Globe and Mail / Shawn McCarthy / 07 September 2018

The deluge flooded downtown streets and basements of high-rise office towers, causing more than $80-million in damage and nearly drowning two men who were trapped in an elevator with the rising water.

The Aug. 7 downpour in Toronto dropped 72 millimetres of rain in the city centre in a few hours, the kind of storm that is expected only once every 100 years, according to Environment Canada. Bay Street towers, including TD Centre, took on storm water and lost power; service was disrupted at Toronto’s commuter hub, Union Station; and ground-floor meeting rooms were under water at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

The $80-million is for insured damages, the Insurance Bureau of Canada said on Friday. Uninsured costs were likely higher, while severe weather across the province has caused more than $1-billion in insured property damage, the bureau said.

It was a summer of fire, heat and flood in Canada.

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Orphan wells: Alberta’s $47 billion problem

The Western Producer / Barb Glen / 22 March 2018

“It’s been my concern for many years, as an advocate for landowners and farmers, that diligence by government and the oil industry was required to ensure that farmers and ranchers don’t get left with the legacy problems of old oil and gas wells,” said Keith Wilson, a lawyer known for his work on property rights.

He quoted a report by the C.D. Howe Institute that estimates more than 155,000 Alberta energy wells have no economic potential and will eventually require reclamation.

He also quoted Orphan Well Association figures that it costs an average of $304,448 to reclaim a well.

That math leads to a big number: $47.19 billion in future reclamation costs.

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More heat, drought and longer fire season in Canada’s future

Montreal Gazette / Anna Junker / 18 August 2018

Heat and drought. A longer fire season with more frequent wildfires and larger areas burned. That’s what’s in store for Canada, especially the prairie provinces, in the coming years, experts say, a situation that is being directly attributed to climate change.

In Canada, 2.5-million hectares — equivalent to about half the size of Nova Scotia — burn every year from wildfires on average. The annual destruction has more than doubled since about the 1970s, where numbers were around one million hectares.

Current projections forecast even warmer, drier conditions across the country, creating the perfect catalyst for more wildfires in the future.

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10 handy facts about Canadian energy

DesmogCanada / James Wilt / 01 May 2018

Every day, we’re assailed with dozens of facts and figures about energy issues in Canada: how many jobs or royalties will come from a new pipeline, the annual growth rate of renewables, our per-person energy consumption.

But it’s often tricky to decipher truth from fiction.

That’s where the new 176-page encyclopedic report by veteran earth scientist and expert in coal and unconventional fuels David Hughes is meant to come in.

“Hopefully what it does is it provides the foundation of facts,” Hughes said in an interview with DeSmog Canada. “There’s a lot of rhetoric when it comes to energy. I wanted to make that quantitative so we actually had that bottom line of facts, rather than conjecture. I’m not trying to be prescriptive. I don’t have a magic answer. But I think we need to start with the facts.”

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
TB Projects

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