Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Business (80)

Ontario craft breweries are serious about resource management

NRCAN / Heads Up CIPEC / Vol 21 No 4

“We know breweries are increasingly aware that water is the most important ingredient in their business operations,” says Kevin Jones, President of the BLOOM Centre for Sustainability. “They are starting to recognize the opportunities to save money in the beer-making process by reusing water, capturing free energy and diverting spent yeast and other materials to beneficial end-use applications.”

A 2016 survey of Ontario craft breweries, conducted by BLOOM, supports Jones’ statement indicating that 97 percent of respondents understand the importance of improving their water and resource management not only to address their bottom line but to protect the environment and be proactive community partners.

The survey indicates that respondents are either in the midst of or are planning numerous measures to address resource conservation. Key features include implementing more water efficient practices to reduce water use, diverging materials before they enter the drain, using dry cleaning techniques, monitoring water use in different parts of operations, implementing better wastewater management design, and installing technology to treat wastewater on-site.

To help craft breweries in their efforts to manage water sustainably, BLOOM launched an online platform, Water & Beer that provides them with detailed information on best practices in water management.

As the BLOOM survey has shown, awareness of resource conservation is increasing and there are a myriad of opportunities. Taking action on these opportunities will benefit their business, their local community and the environment.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

United Church embraces startups

Globe and Mail / Mark Rendell / 03 July 2017

The Markham Community Innovation Hub, which can host up to 20 entrepreneurs, is only a small part of a broader shift in the United Church. In an attempt to engage millennials and reimagine its role in communities across the country, the church is turning to the language and techniques of startup culture.

Two years ago, EDGE ran its first Social Innovation Challenge in Toronto, inviting entrepreneurs and social activists, both church and non-church members, to pitch ideas that would be considered for small amounts of seed funding, ranging from $500 to $1,500. Successful applicants had to show that their ideas were not only financially viable, but also beneficial to the community.

They’ve since run challenges in cities across the country and established an online network to connect over 170 initiatives with business mentors.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Business is sweet for butter tart baker

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 30 June 2017

Bake a better butter tart and the world, it seems, will beat a path to your door.

“I’m amazed – delighted – at the enthusiasm that people have for butter tarts,” she said. “You can see it in their eyes. They get so excited: ‘Butter tarts!’”

Barr’s award-winning tart is a true Eastern Ontario creation. She uses Red Fife wheat grown outside of Gananoque and ground into flour at the 207-year-old mill in Delta. Leaf lard for the dough comes from Two Rivers Food Hub in Smiths Falls, which uses local pigs. A roadside stand outside of North Augusta supplied the rhubarb; Gibbons Family Farm in Frankville produced the maple syrup; the eggs come from Burnbrae Farms in Lyn; and the butter was churned at Stirling Creamery.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

This Canadian site lets anyone be a cleantech investor

FastCompany / Ben Schiller / 13 June 2017

On CoPower, an investment platform for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects, you don’t have to make concessions between decent financial returns and decent environmental impact (as is often the case elsewhere). If you’re willing to put up at least $5,000, you’re promised 5% a year over five years, and your money goes to solar farms, geothermal installations, and building retrofits.

The only catch: Currently, you need to be a Canadian citizen to access the site.

For everyday investors wanting to put their money into social and environmentally themed projects, Canada offers better options than the U.S. does at the moment (along with universal healthcare, a lower drinking age, and soon, legal marijuana). Since it relaxed its financial regulations last year, Canada allows ordinary “non-accredited investors” to make direct investments online in private projects.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Zero Carbon Building Standard

Canada Green Building Council / May 2017

The Canadian green building sector has been active – for decades – in finding ways to limit harmful impacts from the built environment. While many of these efforts have been voluntary, an increasing number of governments across the country have recognized the potential of the building sector to fight climate change and have set more specific targets. To meet the COP21 goal of keeping global average temperature increases well below 2ºC, green building organizations around the world are supporting the objective of eliminating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the operation of new buildings by 2030, and eliminating the GHG emissions from all buildings by 2050.

To meet those targets, bold new approaches are required to drive innovation. For its part, the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) has created a new zero carbon standard for assessing the carbon performance of commercial, institutional, and multi-family buildings in Canada. The CaGBC Zero Carbon Building Standard is a unique, made-in-Canada solution to achieving our climate change commitments, providing a path for both new and existing buildings to reach zero carbon.

[ EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ]

Port’s progress boosting regional economy

Recorder & Times / Sabrina Bedford / 12 June 2017

The benefits to the regional economy of having a local port on the international seaway are evident throughout the area, [Robert Dalley, the port’s general manager] said.

“The port processes and transports over 1.2 million metric tons of goods each year used by local businesses, farms and municipalities but it also creates jobs, attracts inward investment and contributes significantly to the environmental stability of our region.”

Last year, the port also spent $2.2 million on more grain storage and automating equipment in the grain elevator, he said. The new grain bins were immediately filled with non-GMO corn from Ingredion Canada Corporation to manufacture products at its Cardinal plant.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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