Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Biodiversity (107)

Best flowers to plant with vegetables

Mother Earth News / Rosalind Creasy / February/March 2015

It turns out that flowers are an essential ingredient in establishing a healthy garden because they attract beneficial insects and birds, which control pests and pollinate crops. Most gardeners understand this on some level. They may even know that pollen and nectar are food for insects, and that seed heads provide food for birds. What some may not realize is just how many of our wild meadows and native plants have disappeared under acres of lawn, inedible shrubs and industrial agriculture’s fields of monocultures, leaving fewer food sources for beneficial critters. With bees and other pollinators under a chemical siege these days and their populations in drastic decline, offering chemical-free food sources and safe havens is crucial. Plus, giving beneficial insects supplemental food sources of pollen and nectar throughout the season means they’ll stick around for when pests show up.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

First steps toward building a local regeneration movement

Organic Consumers Association / 9 October 2017

The paradigm shift from degenerative food, farming and land-use practices toward regenerative practices—those that regenerate soil, biodiversity, health, local economies and climate stability—is arguably the most critical transformation occurring throughout the world today.

Regeneration practices, scaled up globally on billions of acres of farmland, pasture and forest, have the potential to not only mitigate, but also to reverse global warming. At the same time, these practices provide solutions to other burning issues such as poverty, deteriorating public health, environmental degradation and global conflict.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The Global Risks Report 2018

World Economic Forum / January 2018

Humanity has become remarkably adept at understanding how to mitigate conventional risks that can be relatively easily isolated and managed with standard risk-management approaches. But we are much less competent when it comes to dealing with complex risks in the interconnected systems that underpin our world, such as organizations, economies, societies and the environment. There are signs of strain in many of these systems: our accelerating pace of change is testing the absorptive capacities of institutions, communities and individuals. When risk cascades through a complex system, the danger is not of incremental damage but of “runaway collapse” or an abrupt transition to a new, suboptimal status quo.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Canada fails to protect bees

RT / 21 December 2017

Environmental groups in Canada have lashed out at the government, saying it has failed to protect bees. Ottawa has proposed limiting the use of bee-killing insecticides, but environmentalists want them completely banned.

On Tuesday, Health Canada’s pest control body issued a report on a group of pesticides, called neonicotinoids, giving the green light to their further use before making final decisions in March 2018.

The move riled conservation activists, who are calling on the government to follow the lead taken by other countries and introduce an all-out ban on the chemicals. Also known as neonics, they are applied in a wide range of areas, including agriculture, forestry and flea treatment for pets.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

There’s No App For That

Post Carbon Institute / July 2017

Technology and Morality in the Age of Climate Change, Overpopulation, and Biodiversity Loss

Technology has grown with us, side by side, since the dawn of human society. Each time that we’ve turned to technology to solve a problem or make us more comfortable, we’ve been granted a solution. But it turns out that all of the gifts technology has bestowed on us have come with costs. And now we are facing some of our biggest challenges: climate change, overpopulation, and biodiversity loss. Naturally, we’ve turned to our longtime friend and ally—technology—to get us out of this mess. But are we asking too much this time?

[ WEBSITE ]

8 more amazing benefits of trees

The Climate Lemon / Tegan Tallullah / 29 October 2017

It’s safe to say that life would not be the same without trees. In fact, all human civilisation is dependent upon them. Not only as a source of valuable resources, but also for the ecological benefits they provide – called ecosystem services. We all know trees are awesome, but most people don’t quite understand all the important things they do.

I’m sure you know the basic stuff:

  • Trees produce oxygen, which we need to breath
  • They absorb carbon dioxide, helping us fight climate change
  • They produce timber, firewood and paper
  • They provide a habitat for wildlife

But do you know that trees are also a natural flood defence? Or that they help to block out excess noise? Or that patients heal quicker if they have a view of trees? Here’s 8 amazing benefits of trees that might be new to you.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
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