Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Biodiversity (127)

New camp offers nature learning in Brockville and Lyn

Recorder & Times / Marshall Healey / 10 June 2019

The Frontenac Arch Biosphere (FAB) Foundation and Network is expanding into the Brockville area for eight unique weeks of camp for children aged five to 11, with a leader in training program available for 12 and 13-year-olds.

The nature camp, as described by program manager Kelly McGann, focuses heavily on play-space learning.

“(The campers) are learning about where they live and what the importance of their role in that environment is,” said McGann. “The idea is exposing people to where they live, to the different elements of the environment that they are living in.”

The camp will be at Mac Johnson on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and Lyn Valley Conservation Area Tuesday and Thursday each week.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Climate-savvy alternatives to lawns

Mother Earth News / Sue Reed, Ginny Stoibolt / May 2019

Churches, schools, businesses, municipalities, states, and other larger land­owners often possess huge swaths of unneeded and unused lawn. If home­owners can make a real difference by replacing most of the lawn on their own small properties, imagine the multiplied effect if land managers changed their status quo from large lawns to something else. We’d have less pollution, fewer greenhouse gas emissions, reduced stormwater overflow, and at the same time we’d have richer habitat, more food production, and a cooler environment.

Landowners also stand to benefit from the switch. In addition to being better stewards for their land, large landholders could save money that could be spent elsewhere. Also, if the community becomes involved in the project in some way, they could generate goodwill and positive publicity, which might influence even more homeowners and other businesses to follow suit.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Nature’s Dangerous Decline ‘Unprecedented’

IPBES / Media Release / 06 May 2019

Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the summary of which was approved at the 7th session of the IPBES Plenary, meeting last week (29 April – 4 May) in Paris.

“The overwhelming evidence of the IPBES Global Assessment, from a wide range of different fields of knowledge, presents an ominous picture,” said IPBES Chair, Sir Robert Watson. “The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Stuck between hope and fear

The Agenda with Steve Paikin / 07 November 2018

Neither the dire warnings recently issued by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change nor the decades-long efforts of environmentalists have incited enough action on climate change. Why not? The Agenda welcomes Graham Saul, the executive director of Nature Canada, to discuss his research that shows it might have to do with how the story of climate change gets told.

It’s official – spending time outside is good for you

University of East Anglia / Press Release / 06 July 2018

Summer park in Hamburg, Germany
Living close to nature and spending time outside has significant and wide-ranging health benefits – according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

A new report published today reveals that exposure to greenspace reduces the risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, premature death, preterm birth, stress, and high blood pressure.

Populations with higher levels of greenspace exposure are also more likely to report good overall health – according to global data involving more than 290 million people.

Lead author Caoimhe Twohig-Bennett, from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, said: “Spending time in nature certainly makes us feel healthier, but until now the impact on our long-term wellbeing hasn’t been fully understood.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

7 fast growing shade trees to slash your electric bill

Treehugger / Derek Markham / 02 April 2014

The free solar energy that hits the Earth each day can keep us warm, light our homes, grow our food, and generate clean renewable electricity, so we often invite it into our lives, but when the weather heats up in the summer, the sun can actually cause us to use more energy, because we then need to run air conditioners to cool us back down.

Keeping the sun off of our homes and windows during the summer can end up saving us both money and energy, because we can avoid some of the heating effects and keep our homes cooler to begin with, so less energy is required to keep them comfortable. And one of the best ways to do that is by planting shade trees in the right location around our home, where they can block the sun from streaming in our windows and heating our walls and roofs during certain times of the day.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
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