Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Biodiversity (130)

Animals adapt to climate heat, but too slowly

Physics World / Tim Radford / 09 August 2019

Earth is home to many millions of species that have evolved – and adapted or gone extinct – with successive dramatic shifts in climate over the last 500 million years.

The rapid heating of the planet in a climate emergency driven by profligate fossil fuel use threatens a measurable shift in climate conditions and is in any case coincident with what looks like the beginning of a mass extinction that could match any recorded in the rocks of the Permian, or other extinctions linked with global climate change.

The difference is that climate is now changing at a rate far faster than any previous episode. So can those animals that cannot migrate to cooler climates adjust to changing conditions?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Farming and eating need to change to curb global warming

CBC News / 08 August 2019

The way the world manages land, produces and eats food has to change to curb global warming or food security, health and biodiversity will be at risk, a United Nations report on the effects of climate change on land said on Thursday.

The report said global population growth and changes in consumption patterns have caused unprecedented rates of land and water use. It called for big changes to farming and eating habits, but stopped short of explicitly advocating going meat-free.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

18,000 pieces of balloon waste found in Great Lakes

USA Today / Keith Matheny / 19 June 2019

Pregnancies. Births. Birthdays. Graduations. Anniversaries. Promotions. Retirements. Even deaths. Balloons are used to decorate, celebrate or commemorate almost every major life event.

But there’s a growing awareness that balloons released to the sky come down to Earth, somewhere, as litter, 100% of the time. And that litter, in addition to polluting the environment, can be deadly to animals that eat the balloons or get tangled in them.

Volunteer trash pickups found more than 18,000 balloons, balloon pieces or balloon strings along Great Lakes shorelines between 2016 and last year. That’s according to surveys from such events sponsored by environmental nonprofit Alliance for the Great Lakes.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

New camp offers nature learning in Brockville and Lyn

Recorder & Times / Marshall Healey / 10 June 2019

The Frontenac Arch Biosphere (FAB) Foundation and Network is expanding into the Brockville area for eight unique weeks of camp for children aged five to 11, with a leader in training program available for 12 and 13-year-olds.

The nature camp, as described by program manager Kelly McGann, focuses heavily on play-space learning.

“(The campers) are learning about where they live and what the importance of their role in that environment is,” said McGann. “The idea is exposing people to where they live, to the different elements of the environment that they are living in.”

The camp will be at Mac Johnson on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and Lyn Valley Conservation Area Tuesday and Thursday each week.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Climate-savvy alternatives to lawns

Mother Earth News / Sue Reed, Ginny Stoibolt / May 2019

Churches, schools, businesses, municipalities, states, and other larger land­owners often possess huge swaths of unneeded and unused lawn. If home­owners can make a real difference by replacing most of the lawn on their own small properties, imagine the multiplied effect if land managers changed their status quo from large lawns to something else. We’d have less pollution, fewer greenhouse gas emissions, reduced stormwater overflow, and at the same time we’d have richer habitat, more food production, and a cooler environment.

Landowners also stand to benefit from the switch. In addition to being better stewards for their land, large landholders could save money that could be spent elsewhere. Also, if the community becomes involved in the project in some way, they could generate goodwill and positive publicity, which might influence even more homeowners and other businesses to follow suit.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Nature’s Dangerous Decline ‘Unprecedented’

IPBES / Media Release / 06 May 2019

Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the summary of which was approved at the 7th session of the IPBES Plenary, meeting last week (29 April – 4 May) in Paris.

“The overwhelming evidence of the IPBES Global Assessment, from a wide range of different fields of knowledge, presents an ominous picture,” said IPBES Chair, Sir Robert Watson. “The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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